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  • 1.
    Adasevic, Ivan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Palosaari, Viljam
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Multi-project Management in an Internal Development Context: A case study focused on identifying challenges in project portfolio management at ABB Components2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis was to explore what challenges are identified in project portfolio management (PPM) in an internal multi-project environment. The aim of this study was to find the underlying reason for the occurrence of challenges in terms of how these challenges occur, and why do they occur. To realize the purpose and the aim of the study, the research was conducted at ABB Components, a business unit of ABB Group. Further, based on identified challenges provide a set of guidelines and recommendations for managing and countering the challenges.

    To understand the research problem a literature review was employed and a case study was conducted at ABB Components. The purpose of the literature review was to gain a theoretical background related to the research topic, identify challenges or problems, and potential solutions, with the purpose of establishing a connection to the challenges identified in the case study. The empirical work consisted of the case study conducted at ABB Components and was constituted by interviews person. The analysis of the results was validated with a workshop held with interviewees, with discussions regarding the findings. Guidelines and recommendations for managing challenges related to project portfolio management were designed from the results of empirical and theoretical work.

    The 11 main challenges related to project portfolio management were identified throughout three defined project phases, initiation of a project, execution of a project and project closure, and was appearing either in one phase or across phases. The challenges in this research were correlated to four main causes; limited resources (budget & time), limited resources (personnel), vague directives, and project maturity. The identified challenges can be encountered and managed by utilizing existing models for project management, improved information handling, expanding the notion of criteria for project success, performing a resource capacity analysis, and planning for the project closure.

    The theoretical and practical work have contributed to a collective analysis of what types of challenges are evident in phases throughout a single project, and what outcomes these challenges can have on a project portfolio in an internal multi-project environment and . It has to some extent indicated differences among challenges and causes evident in multi-project settings, for projects that are classified as internal development or product development, implicating differences throughout the project phase. Furthermore the challenges have pivoted around the three main themes centered indicating that there are challenges related to each phase of the project life, as well as challenges which are apparent across the project phases.

  • 2.
    Al-Bawi, Abbas
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Spare parts management potential in production sector2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Spare parts management (SPM) is an important branch of management which could lead the company to success or bankruptcy. It is also fill of potential improvements that can increase the company profits, productivity, and reliability. Wise inventory management would eliminate all the delay risks of unplanned breakdowns, and reduce process time and cost. 

    To understand the importance of the spare parts, a fundamental knowledge of maintenance types, spare parts, spare parts management, spare parts classifications, ABC analysis, Economic order quantity, suppliers’ management, purchase management, and management computer program SAP, have been viewed.

    Companies realize the spare parts importance and try to develop the system to increase the benefits. Many ways has been taken to achieve that. Each company has it is own management system that the company has developed in years.

    In this research, spare parts management system of seven companies has been studied. By comparing of the management systems, we highlight the areas that would have negative or positive impact on the system. We would also analysis why the companies have chosen these systems, how they develop the system, and where they aim throw the development.

    Reviewing case studies would have many advantages, it would expand the vision to develop the management system and focus on the points that have permanent value instead of focus on temporary improvement.

    Two check lists of points that could have potential improvement, have been presented and in which improvement type.

  • 3.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala university.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University.
    The Stake of Customers and Suppliers in Mergers and Acquisitions2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Mona
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Välfärdsektorn, en arena för makt och motstånd: Studier av sjukvård och hemtjänst2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today there is a growing interest in research on concrete practice within organizations, which has implications for the understanding of how performance management works. New control ideals are often introduced in an organizational and socially embedded practice, where taken for granted assumptions about what is right and wrong or good and bad actions are already established. Governance can ideally be seen as an interaction between structure and actor, where the former both guides and limits the conduct of the latter. However, in this thesis I can show that local actors can act differently and exhibit resistance in interactions with their superiors, thus they are not as passive as the ideal assumes. The theoretical framework is based on Giddens' structuration theory that stresses there is a dialectical relationship between structure and actor. (New)institutional theory contributes to get insights into the participants' behavior and that meaning is shaped by wider institutional influences.

    The empirical data in this thesis consists of two studies; an inter-organizational care chain project and a study in assisted living. Both studies were carried out as case studies where qualitative interviews, observations, and various official documents have been used. In the care chain project the aim is to produce knowledge about how a change process has been undertaken to promote the development of a seamless chain of care between different healthcare providers. The assisted living study examines how the interaction between actor and structure manifests at three critical events. Within the work units (the actors) knowledge and practices are established, based on care ideals. Economically administrative ideal (the structure) is based on a hierarchical approach in which goals and metrics are linked to budgets, activities and standards and where decision-making is decoupled from the actual work. This decoupling can make the work more clearly measured, monitored and streamlined, thus keeping players accountable for their actions and achievements. The actors are seen as cogs in a machine rather than as insightful and engaged. Therefore they are assigned to an inconspicuous place in the framework that the financial administrative ideal has determined. This ideal is the cornerstone of New Public Management (NPM) and holds the private sector as a model in terms of management, steering and control of a business. Although local actors can exhibit resistance towards this ideal, they still are limited by its authoritative power of determining the allocation of resources.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Athrey, Suma
    Brunel University, UK.
    Batsakis, Georgios
    Brunel University, UK.
    Complementarity and substitution in the knowledge networks of R&D subsidiaries2016In: Research in Global Strategic Management - Volume 18 (2016): Perspectives on Headquarters-Subsidiary Relationships in the Contemporary MNC / [ed] Ambos, B., Ambos, T. & Birkinshaw, J.M., London: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, 247-274 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue that a foreign-based R&D subsidiary of a multinational enterprise (MNE) can potentially source knowledge from three diverse knowledge networks, namely (i) external knowledge network of the homecountry, (ii) external knowledge network of the host country, and (iii) internal (MNE) knowledge network. Drawing on the relative costs andbenefits associated with the process of synergistic knowledge, this studyexamines whether a substitutive or a complementary relationship exists when two of the aforementioned networks collaborate in order to generate new knowledge at the subsidiary level.

    Our study’s sample is based on asurvey questionnaire addressed to foreign-based R&D subsidiaries of Fortune 500 companies. We assess the existence of complementarity/substitutability using the “production function approach.” Our results indicate that a complementary relationship exists between external knowledge network of the host and the home country, as well as between external knowledge network of the host country and internal knowledge network. On the other hand, external knowledge network of the home country and internal knowledge network form a substitutive relationship. Our study offers a more comprehensive view of the diverse sources/knowledge networks that R&D subsidiaries are sourcing knowledge from when compared to existing research. We also specify and account for the costs/benefits involved in knowledge sourcing and thereby detect possible substitution/complementarity between different sources ofknowledge. So far, there has been limited to nonexistent research into the diversity of knowledge networks of R&D subsidiaries and the examination of potential substitutabilities and complementarities. Hence our empirical study contributes to the development of this particular research stream.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Benito, Gabriel R. G.
    BI Norwegian Business School, Norway.
    Lunnan, Randi
    BI Norwegian Business School, Norway.
    Costs and Performance Implications from HQs Intervention in Subsidiaries’ Affairs2014In: Strategies in a World of Networks, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on HQ intervention and the costs associated with it. Extant literature specifies HQ interventions inareas such as organizing lateral knowledge transfers, strategic planning,support functions, transfer of knowledge to subsidiaries, control mechanisms as means to reduce incentive problems. We link MNC organization with the magnitude of HQ intervention in subunits’ affairs, and examine types of costs such meddling gives rise to. This gives us the possibility ofteasing out how increased costs of specific intrusions will affect the netvalue of HQ action. HQ intervention effects the motivation of subunits and influences the different types of costs. We argue that the scope and type of intervention as well as subsidiary characteristics affect the severity of cost increases, ultimately influencing MNC performance.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway.
    Buckley, Peter
    Leeds University Business School, UK.
    Dellestrand, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    In the Right Place at the Right Time! The Influence of Knowledge Governance Tools on Knowledge Transfer and Utilization in MNEs2015In: Global Strategy Journal, ISSN 2042-5791, E-ISSN 2042-5805, Vol. 5, no 1, 27-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the utilization of knowledge transferred between sending and receiving subsidiaries within multinational enterprises. A model was developed and tested on 169 specific knowledge transfer projects. The model explains the utilization of knowledge subject to transfer in terms of hierarchical governance tool efficacy and lateral relationships within the multinational enterprise. The results show that headquarters' involvement during knowledge development does not have any significant impact on subsequent knowledge utilization in the receiving units and, in fact, hierarchical governance forms have a negative impact on knowledge utilization. However, lateral relationships are positive stimuli to building subsidiary capabilities in the knowledge transfer process that enhance receiving unit knowledge utilization. 

  • 8.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Cuervo-Cazura, Alvaro
    Northeastern University, Boston, USA.
    Nielsen, Bo
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Explaining Interaction Effects Within and Across Levels of Analysis2014In: Journal of International Business Studies, ISSN 0047-2506, E-ISSN 1478-6990, Vol. 45, no 9, 1063-1071 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manuscripts submitted to the Journal of International Business Studies propose an interaction effect in their models in an effort to explain the complexity and contingency of relationships across borders. In this article, we provide guidance on how best to explain the interaction effects theoretically within and across levels of analysis. First, in the case of interactions within the same level of analysis, we suggest that authors provide an explanation of the mechanisms that link the main independent variable to the dependent variable, and then explain how the interaction variable modifies these mechanisms. Moreover, to ensure that the arguments are theoretically complete, we suggest that authors theoretically rule out the potential reverse interaction effect between the main variable and moderating variable. Second, in the case of interactions across levels of analysis, we suggest that authors identify the cross-level nature of the moderating relationships, specify the level of analysis of the main relationship and the nested nature of the cross-level influences, and theoretically explain these cross-level influences. Additionally, we suggest that authors pay particular attention to nesting in order to theoretically rule out reverse interactions.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ekman, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    The Role of Internal Embeddedness for Subsidiary Influence in the Multinational Enterprise2014In: / [ed] Rian Drogendijk, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoverall aim is to address the role of internal embeddedness in subsidiary’sinfluence on strategic decisions in the multinational enterprise andspecifically discuss how the internal production network and the subsidiary management’sinterpersonal relationships facilitate and impede its potential influence.  The two dimensions of internal embeddednessare scrutinized individually and then put together in a conceptualframework.  The internal productionnetwork is made up of where and what the subsidiary do, i.e. their activitiesand how these activities are related to the sister subsidiaries’ activities (astructural dimension), and the interpersonal network is based upon thesubsidiary management’s “voice” and standing in the larger MNC. The papers tentativeconclusion – presented as a conceptual model – is that the internal productionnetwork is the baseline for the degree of strategic influence a subsidiary haswhilst the subsidiary management’s interpersonal network can extend thisinfluence.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Dasi, Angels
    Univ Valencia, Spain.
    Mudambi, Ramb
    Temple Univ, Fox Sch Business, Philadelphia, USA.
    Pedersen, Torben
    Bocconi Univ, Milan, Italy.
    Technology, innovation and knowledge: The importance of ideas and international connectivity2016In: Journal of world business (Print), ISSN 1090-9516, E-ISSN 1878-5573, Vol. 51, no 1, 153-162 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relevance of ideas is at the core of the IB field and has been captured in concepts like technology, innovation and knowledge. While these concepts have evolved over the last decades, the point that the ideas and the international connectivity are central for IB remains genuine. This paper is an attempt to take stock of the evolution of the concepts technology, innovation and knowledge in IB literature along the past five decades with a particular focus on the role of the Columbia Journal of World Business (CJWB) and the Journal of World Business (JWB) in this evolution. Likewise, our objective is to offer a research agenda for the coming decade. We proceed in two steps. First, we scrutinize how the IB literature has progressed and expanded over the last five decades, illustrating this on the basis of articles published in CJWB and JWB. Second, we take a helicopter view on this literature and reflect on the insights we have gained and the challenges the IB field has ahead that can constitute the basis for a future research agenda. We highlight the importance of creating a micro-foundation of knowledge processes where mechanisms on the interaction between the higher levels (nation, firm, teams) and the individual level are clarified.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Dellestrand, H.
    Uppsala University.
    Pedersen, T.
    Uppsala University.
    The contribution of local environments to competence creation in multinational enterprises2014In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 47, no 1-2, 87-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the competence development of subsidiaries in multinational enterprises. We analyze how local subsidiary environments affect the development of technological and business competencies among other units in the multinational enterprise. We test our predictions using data from 2,107 foreign-owned subsidiaries located in seven European countries, by means of structural equation modeling - namely, LISREL. By bringing the local environment to the fore, we contribute to the literature on the emergence and determinants of firm-specific advantages. We link local subsidiary environments to the development of the competencies of other units in the multinational enterprise. The role of the multinational enterprise is characterized as integrative, as it may bridge local competencies and environments that are conducive to competence creation, and as it facilitates the use of resources residing locally throughout the organization. Thus, we contribute to an enhanced understanding of location as a determinant of the creation of units of competence and centers of excellence within multinational enterprises. In other words, we demonstrate that country-specific advantages are beneficial for competence creation in units other than the local subsidiary. We thereby link country-specific advantages to the creation of firm-specific advantages in the multinational enterprise - i.e., the multinational enterprise can build and augment firm-specific advantages by making the most of country-specific advantages.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Dellestrand, Henrik
    Uppsala universitet, Sverige.
    Pedersen, Torben
    Bocconi University, Italy.
    Headquarters’ orchestration of Subsidiaries’ Contribution to MNCPerformance2014In: Local Contexts in Global Business, Vancouver: Academy of International Business , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anchored in a subsidiary evolutionary framework,this paper analyzes how headquarters of multinational corporations canorchestrate its network of subsidiaries. Headquarters orchestration is a valueadding activity aimed at increasing the performance of the organization. Grantingsubsidiaries autonomy and giving them attention is found to positivelyinfluence the scope of subsidiary activities as well as the level of subsidiarycompetencies. This corresponds to how headquarters, as a hub-type of firm, canadd value by orchestrating for subsidiary evolution. Furthermore, our resultsindicate that if subsidiaries evolve it has positive effects on the overall performanceof the multinational corporation. Thus, our findings help to explain howheadquarters may create value within the multinational corporation in terms ofincreasing subsidiaries’ contribution to performance. The results, based on asample of 2107 subsidiaries, elucidate the entrepreneurial role and function ofheadquarters as an important orchestrator of the multinational corporation forsubsidiary evolution and value creation. Theoretically, this extends theunderstanding of drivers and effects of subsidiary evolution and assigns animportant role and function to headquarters in the orchestration of networkedmultinational corporations.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Dimitratos, Pavlos
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Liouka, Ioanna
    International University in Geneva, Suisse.
    Network Influence on MNC Subsidiary Initiativ2014In: The Intersection of International Entrepreneurship Knowledge: Bridging the Gap Between Entrepreneurship and International Business / [ed] Valerie Bell, Yang-Pei Lin, Spiros Batas, Denis Frydrych and Elizabeth Montoya Martinez., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Value-chain networks are of major importance to multinational subsidiaries, yet they have failed to receive significant attention in the literature. We extend the knowledge-based view of the firm by exploring whether three different types of multinational subsidiary networks have dissimilar impact on their initiatives. The level and degree of subsidiary entrepreneurial activities enhances subsidiary performance and generate positive externalities in both the wider multinational corporation (MNC) system and the host country (Birkinshaw, 2000; Dimitratos et al., 2009). Despite the increased interest in the determinants of subsidiary initiative and knowledge integration, the existing literature has primarily focused on the characteristics of the knowledge, e.g. tacitness, stickiness, causal ambiguity, and attributes of the sender and receiver, such as, motivation and absorptive capacity; while the location, or sources, of the knowledge remain largely un-researched with a few exceptions (see e.g. Forsgren, 1999; Foss and Pedersen, 2002). Likewise, network theorists have emphasized different forms of networks as productive for entrepreneurial initiatives (Coleman, 1998; Burt, 2000); and described structural characteristics impeding entrepreneurial activity leading to organizational myopia (Uzzi, 1997; Hansen 1999). Very few, if any, attempts have been pursued to explain how the different types of networks a subsidiary is simultaneously involved affect its entrepreneurial initiatives. We develop four hypotheses based on MNC network and initiative literature streams.

    750 UK based subsidiaries originating from the US, EU and Japan were randomly selected, adding up to a total sample of 2,250 subsidiaries. After excluding subsidiaries that were not eligible to participate in the survey, the actual sample of subsidiaries ended up being 1,770 subsidiaries. A structured questionnaire was pretested by academics and subsidiary managers in order to check its comprehensibility and clarity before the launch of the survey. The data collection from the 1,770 subsidiaries included three postal waves and two rounds of follow-up phone calls in between. The total number of usable responses that we employed to test our hypotheses was 268 subsidiaries. A structured questionnaire was posted to each subsidiary’s managing director; while a second top management respondent also participated in the survey

    in 10% of the sample to establish inter-rater reliability. The overall response rate across the entire sample of subsidiaries was 16%. The Likert scales draw from previously developed measures. We also took measures to control for common method variance following the suggestions of Podsakoff et al. (2003).

    Based on this sample of 268 subsidiaries and a moderated regression analysis, we find that value-chain networks have a higher positive impact than multinational corporation networks and non value-chain networks; because they may provide the subsidiary knowledge with market opportunities that it lacks and that the other types of networks cannot effectively provide. However, value-chain networks have a negative effect on initiative of a subsidiary operating in an environment of high uncertainty; because they can constrain the exploration and creation of new knowledge that cannot be provided by any of the networks. Contrary to our expectations, the combined effect of value-chain and non-value chain networks has a negative influence on enhancing initiatives; and, the combined effect of value-chain and MNC networks does not affect entrepreneurial initiatives.

    This paper has considerable research implications. As regards the knowledge based view, the paper argues that not all firm-external knowledge is equally valuable in developing entrepreneurial initiatives. The value of this knowledge may depend on whether the subsidiary needs that knowledge. Since an MNC subsidiary tends to lack knowledge about its local and foreign country market opportunities and such knowledge is difficult for it to acquire because it is tacit, establishing networks with value-chain partners that have this knowledge generates entrepreneurial initiatives. This is especially the case when subsidiaries operate in an environment of high certainty. Furthermore, knowledge accessed through both value-chain and other types of networks may not bring synergistic effects as it is likely to be complex and time consuming to manage.

    The paper also contributes to the theme of subsidiary entrepreneurship. This is the first study to more fully examine the role of subsidiary value-chain networks in enhancing entrepreneurial initiatives. Prior studies focus primarily on MNC networks and host-country networks. Additionally, this is seemingly the first study that compared the relative effects of all three types of networks on subsidiary entrepreneurial initiatives. It shows that, after considering the effects of other types of networks, value-chain networks appear to have the largest positive influence, especially when the subsidiaries operate in an environment of high certainty.

    The paper also contributes to managerial practice. Subsidiary managers who wish to develop initiatives are advised to establish value-chain networks with customers, suppliers and distributors. This is especially the case for subsidiaries operating in a stable environment. In addition, managers are advised to pursue networking activities with solely value-added partners since the simultaneous implementation of all types of value added activities is seemingly detrimental for entrepreneurial initiatives.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ekman, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Erixon, Cecilia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Internal MNC structures’ bearing on externally embedded subsidiaries’ organizational performance2015In: Handbook on International Alliance and Network Research / [ed] Larimo, J & Nummela, N, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 155-170 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The theoretical research stream that depicts multinational companies (MNCs) as networked organizations has offered new insights on contemporary enterprises’ way of functioning. However, the majority of the research has focused on external embeddedness, that is, MNC subsidiaries’ local business relationships, and its impact on subsidiary organizational performance. This conceptual chapter addresses the lack of research focusing on internal embeddedness, that is, subsidiary relationships with headquarters and sister subsidiaries. Internal embeddedness is discussed from two dimensions: the internal production network and the MNC manager’s social network. The characteristics of each dimension and how they relate to earlier research, leads to a number of theoretical propositions. The chapter concludes with a discussion on how external and internal embeddedness relate, as well as how they may impact the subsidiary’s (organizational) performance.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway.
    Forsgren, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Holm, U.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Balancing subsidiary influence in the federative MNC: A business network view2015In: Knowledge, Networks and Power: The Uppsala School of International Business, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 393-420 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Forsgren, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Holm, U.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    The strategic impact of external networks: Subsidiary performance and competence development in the multinational corporation2015In: Knowledge, Networks and Power: The Uppsala School of International Business, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 318-343 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. BI Norwegian Business Sch, Dept Strategy & Logist, Oslo, Norway.
    Gaur, Ajai
    Rutgers State Univ, Sch Business, Dept Management & Global Business, Newark, USA.
    Mudambi, Ram
    Temple Univ, Fox Sch Business, Dept Strateg Management, Philadelphia, USA.
    Persson, Magnus
    Skanska AB, Corp Finance, Stockholm, Sweden.
    UNPACKING INTERUNIT KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER IN MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES2015In: GLOBAL STRATEGY JOURNAL, ISSN 2042-5791, Vol. 5, no 3, 241-255 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the success of knowledge transfer within an MNE network by unpacking aggregate knowledge flows into individual projects. We assess knowledge transfer performance along two dimensions: utilization of transferred knowledge and transfer cost. We argue that the substitutive versus complementary nature of subunits' activities is a key determinant of knowledge utilization at the target subunit. Further, we posit that headquarters' incentives and monitoring are crucial factors affecting both the utilization and transfer cost dimensions. Our empirical results, based on 141 individual intersubunit knowledge transfer projects involving 49 subunits in 12 European countries largely support our arguments. Our methodology highlights the fact that aggregate measures of interunit knowledge flows can be misleading since they may include individual projects with widely differing levels of success. Copyright (C) 2015 Strategic Management Society.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Giblin, Majella
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
    Perri, Alessandra
    Ca' Foscari, University of Venice, Italy.
    Ryan, Paul
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
    Knowledge Creation and Protection in Subsidiaries Embedded in Local Technology Clusters2016In: International Business in a Multi-speed Global Economy / [ed] Kevin Ibeh, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MNE subsidiariesface a trade-off between the ambition to source knowledge that is embedded in the host-location and the need to protect their corporation’s knowledge-based assets from external appropriationby close competitors. In this paper, we explore how foreign subsidiaries operating in a highly competitive knowledge-based cluster or chestrate their local linkages with non-value chain partners to strategically manage the knowledge imperatives to which they are exposed.

    Our results show that subsidiaries establish heterogeneous patterns of interaction with different non-value chain agents in the host location, as their perception regarding the role these agents may play varies. More specifically, in the presence of fierce competition, when higher spillover risks should compel them to refrain from local interaction, subsidiaries do shy away from competitors. However, some simultaneously pursue their knowledge creation objectives by linking to agents that minimize spillover risks while still offering learning opportunities, such as the local university. This leads us to conclude that spillover risks, by themselves, do not automatically drive the choice to avoid interaction, as subsidiaries are able to strategically differentiate between various types of partners. In so doing we reconcile the extant contradiction between the strategic deterrence and physical attraction theses

  • 19.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway.
    Giblin, Majella
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
    Perri, Alessandra
    Ca'Foscari University of Venice, Italy.
    Ryan, Paul A.
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
    Subsidiary Strategies for Local Knowledge Sourcing and Protection: The Role of Partner Heterogeneity2016In: The Locus of Global Innovation, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MNE subsidiaries face a trade-off between the ambition to source knowledge embedded in the host-location and the need to protect their corporation’s knowledge from appropriation by competitors. We explore how foreign subsidiaries operating in a highly competitive clusters orchestrate their local linkages with non-value chain partners to manage the knowledge imperatives they are exposed to.

    Our results show that subsidiaries establish heterogeneous patterns of interaction with different local non-value chain agents. We reconcile the extant contradiction between the strategic deterrence and physical attraction theses in that spillover risks, by themselves, do not automatically drive the choice to avoid interaction.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gillmore, Edward
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Memar, Noushan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    What Happens When You Got It? On the Consequences of Disaggregating Value Chain and Subsidiary Strategic Activities2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ryan, Paul A.
    1National University of Ireland, Galway.
    Clancy, Johanna
    3Galway Business School.
    MNESubsidiary Relationships and R&D role evolution at the Dual Context Nexus2014In: ACHIEVING A NEW BALANCE:The Rise of Multinationals from Emerging Economiesand the Prospects for Established Multinationals / [ed] Annie Wei and Frank McDonald, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subsidiaries ofmultinational enterprises operate in an often conflicting dual context. Theyare at the same time a part of the external local host country environment andthe internal (MNE) global network. There is as yet limited integratedexplanation of the simultaneous co-evolution of internal subsidiary R&D andknowledge density and breadth in this dual network in particular, theconditions under which subsidiaries tap into local knowledge sources and whichnetwork partners are most useful and the attendant relations and role evolution(or diminution) within the MNE. This paper reports on a qualitative study offour MNE subsidiaries that are both internal MNE ‘centre of excellence’ andlong-serving and leading members of a mature high-tech cluster. In a series ofsemi-structured interviews with key knowledge holders the evolution ofsubsidiary R&D roles were teased out and the importance and quality ofrelations in the dual context are identified.

  • 22.
    Axelsson, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Höglund, Linda
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Mårtensson, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    Is what´s good for business good for society? Entrepreneurship in a school settingIn: x, Edward Elgar PublishingChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23. Backlund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Understanding "the PhD-project" - applying narrow and broad perspectives on doctoral studies2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Berndtsson, M.
    et al.
    CEMUS Uppsala University, Bromma, Sweden.
    Drake, L.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hellstrand, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Nolby Ekostrategi, Kil, Sweden.
    Is circular economy a magic bullet?2017In: Natural Resources Available Today and in the Future: How to Perform Change Management for Achieving a Sustainable World, Springer International Publishing , 2017, 281-295 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Boström, Per Staffan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Linköpings Universitet IEI.
    RESURSTILLVÄXT.: Målet för hållbar tillväxt.Manuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Bokprojektet ”HÅLLBAR TILLVÄXT – 2000-talets ledarutmaning” 

    Detta bokprojekt som nu föreligger i ett första manus är uppstarten på en longitudinell och företagsnära forskning om hållbart och resurseffektivt företagande. Projektet som påbörjades 2002  är framförallt engagerat i frågan hur begreppet ”Sustainable Growth”, hållbar tillväxt, ska bli lättare att kommunicera och förstå för att vara användbart i företagets affärsverksamhet. Projektet har genomförts i samarbete med ett antal företag. Successivt har det också uppstått ett behov att finna ett tydligt mål, en enkel formel och en arbetsform för långsiktiga beslut och styrning mot ekonomiskt hållbar tillväxt av alla resurser (per definition) i en organisation. Projektet avhandlar därför innebörden av begreppet RESURSTILLVÄXT.

  • 26.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Development of Robust Production Equipment: A guide to strong collaboration between users and suppliers2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The result of today’s global and increasingly tough competition is narrow market windows and a demand for quick volume increases in production. This in turn means increased demands for a rapid and effective development of production equipment that ensures high performance right at the start of production. Robust production equipment with a high level of production efficiency and reduced costs for operation and maintenance therefore make up one of the most important factors for strong competitiveness and high profitability for Swedish industrial enterprises. Strong collaboration between users and suppliers is the key to success in this type of investment project. This handbook therefore presents a model that can be used by manufacturing companies who want to develop robust production equipment. The model and the other recommendations of the handbook focus on projects that are to be carried out in strong collaboration and are targeted at both users and suppliers. The model has been deve-loped through “EQUIP – User-supplier integration in production equipment design”, which has received funding from the Knowledge Foundation 2013–2016. The model consists of seven development phases based on the production equipment life cycle: Phase 1 – Preliminary study Phase 2 – Concept study Phase 3 – Procurement Phase 4 – Detailed design Phase 5 – Construction Phase 6 – Installation and commissioning Phase 7 – Production In each phase, critical activity steps and recommendations are presented for how to distribute responsibility within and between the parties involved. The model adopts a life cycle perspective for development projects in order to facilitate collaboration and to more clearly visualise the link between activities and their impact on the project success. Within the scope of an investment project, there is a great potential for developing sustainable production solutions. For this reason, this handbook also presents seven guidelines that may provide you with support in developing production equipment that remains secure, lean and sustainable throughout the equipment life cycle. The main purpose of the handbook is to facilitate collaboration through the whole investment project in a way that benefits both parties and which contributes to lasting relationships. The results of the research project show that there is a great interest in improved collaboration from both users and suppliers. For this reason, support, tools and preparedness from both parties are required to venture into investing time and resources in collaboration from the beginning, in the early phases of a new development project. This is then the potential to lay the foundation for long-term collaboration and for designing the best possible production equipment in the shortest time possible.

  • 27.
    Cardfelt, Viktor
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Boström, Patric
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Exploiting Opportunities in Green Building Certification: A study of how energy supply compaies can engage in the green building certification market.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study departed from a research basis being somewhat lacking in the context of green building certification and especially the two-folded problem, regarding the characteristics of the network of business relationships and how an energy supply company should exploit opportunities in this network context and its relationships. As such, the purpose of this study is to investigate and analyse the network context and its business relationship characteristics, as well as to present recommendations of how an energy supply company can engage green building certification and cope with the business relationships in order to exploit business opportunities. Based on previous research regarding the real estate industry, energy service industry and the construction industry, a well-founded literature base could be extended further by applying theoretical concepts related to business relationship elements and strategy-making. The nature of green building certification and to fulfil the purpose of the study, called for a qualitative research strategy performed through a multiple-case study design. This led to the investigation of four certification projects, subject to certifications in the systems of EU GreenBuilding and Miljöbyggnad, where the most important actors, relationships and project contents constitute the empirical data.

    The findings of this thesis suggest that the relationships are characterized as having a short-term focus and an avoidance to become interdependent. In this manner elements such as commitment and adaptation are shown as rather shallow, where actions of commitment are not typically short-term sacrifices for a long-term mutual benefit and adaptations mostly occur with respect to specific projects. The adaptive behaviour is also more or less explained as a standardized procedure, avoiding relationship specific investments. Trust is an important element mostly in order to reflect the competence of the counterpart, where previous successful projects indicate the skill and knowledge. Despite the characteristics of the relationships, the benefits of long-term, high involvement, cooperative relationships were highlighted as good aspects to consider in this context.

    These characteristics, along with outspoken market demands, acted as the basis for the development of recommendations for an energy supply company in terms of a step-wise action framework. In this sense, the first acknowledgement of the framework is that the current position related to green building certification projects of an energy supply company is rather unestablished, with only one exception found. This implies a strategic approach in terms of understanding how to develop and maintain their business relationships, with respect to the previously mentioned characteristics. Through a successful utilization of the action framework (with respect to certain barriers to overcome), this thesis emphasizes a wide range of opportunities such as to have a proactive approach, maintain interactions between projects, to develop the knowledge, to offer a holistic approach and to utilize long-term cooperative relational benefits. The analysis and framework is highly suitable when applied by an energy supply company, but the authors also argue for the findings to be of relevance also for other practitioners in the context of green building certification. In addition, the authors believe that the orientation of this thesis might be a trigger for future similar research approaches, applied in different contexts.

  • 28.
    Carey, Neil
    et al.
    Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
    Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka
    Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA.
    Benozzo, Angelo
    University of Valle d’Aosta, Aosta, Italy.
    Taylor, Carol
    , Sheffield Institute of Education, Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Fairchild, Nikki
    University of Chichester, UK.
    Elmenhorst, Constanse
    independent scholar, Norway.
    Autopsy goes rogue: a theatrical experiment on method2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A (mis)organized stream at a recent academic conference adopted a post-qualitative (in)sensibility in experimenting with how intentionally non-normative practices (more properly practicings) and a play with material objects might disrupt the smoothness of the academicconferencemachine.  One such experiment witnessed the re-assembly of fragmented male doll parts, previously distributed throughout the conference space, onto an ‘autopsy table’.  The autopsy table became a creative participatory theatre for/of doll parts that adopted a range of vital poses and shapes through/out the life of the conference – despite the absence of direction or instruction.  In this instance, the autopsy table featured more like its use in forensic anthropology than that in medical pathology.  This autopsy table was a site of epistemological re-assembly, of putting together thoughts, senses, and practices rather than –as well as by – cutting apart.

    In the proposed session, we re-turn the autopsy table and eschew the idea of ‘the paper’ in the first instance.  Instead, the presentation/performance/experiment/workshop explores the groping, creative assemblages and unpredictable onto-epistemological productivities available through the autopsy table – as a site of assembly and as metaphor – in thinking differently about what social science methods do, claim to do, and might want to do.  Participants – invited to the table to co-produce – will be asked to do so without the benefit of omniscient methodological directionality or ‘full sight’: positioned behind operating screens, and working with a range of materials out of sight.  Participants will thus be asked to rely on the wider bodily sensorium: on touch, on sound, on smell, on affect. 

    The autopsy table encounters envisioned owe a deeply ingrained debt to ‘the cut’: a familiar mainstay of mainstream social sciences that fabricates knowledge through the rigours of dissection, segmentation, conceptualisation, observation, operationalisation, bracketing and other technologies of control and separation.  However, the envisioned autopsical practicings also take seriously and experiment with Barad’s reworking ‘the cut’ as an enactment of contingent rather than absolute separation – of cutting together apart. Our experimentation draws on new materialist and posthuman theories that conceive phenomena as connected entities, emerging from cuts that never produce absolute separation. Phenomena, practices, and processes emerge at the intersection of politics of academic conferences, singular plural, fragmented models and incompletely and messy practising of inquiry, objects imbued with desire, discourses, history and culture. In Law’s (2004) terms the session enacts a ‘method assemblage’ that takes seriously the generative flux of the elusive and ephemeral world that we claim to know through the matrix of method.  The session instantiates a movement from (and threading through of) methodological fabrication toward an enacted stuttering and stammering ‘fabulation’ (Deleuze via O’Sullivan, 2016) for becoming (un)knowing.

  • 29.
    Clancy, Johanna
    et al.
    National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Ryan, Paul
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Giblin, Majella
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    The Janus-Faced Subsidiary: A Coevolutionary Framework of Dual Network Embeddedness2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the emerging literature on the subsidiary in its dual context (Achcaoucaou et al, 2014; Ciabuschi et al, 2014, Figuereido, 2012; Meyer et al., 2011; Mudambi and Swift, 2012). However, this paper departs from the above studies, which all take a rather static view of the dually embedded subsidiary. A dynamic co-evolutionary perspective is taken, by longitudinally tracking the guided coevolution of subsidiary role and local network’s knowledge stock. We subscribe more to the complementarity for balanced coevolution in both contexts (Ciabuschi et al., 2014) over the trade-off thesis in that reliance on one context for resources may limit access to resources in the other context (Gammelgaard and Pedersen, 2010).

    We show how the subsidiary is both a catalyst and coordinator of resource and knowledge flow in a form of guided coevolution to ensure requisite variety and hence accentuate the importance of dual embeddedness in understanding subsidiary evolution.

  • 30.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Aprire i modelli di business. Dalla condivisione delle (buone) idee all’organizzazione dell’innovazione2014In: Sviluppo & Organizzazione, ISSN 0391-7045, no 257, 63-74 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Bridging Gender Gaps, Networking in Computer Science2011In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, Vol. 15, no 2, 319-337 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Contesti di genere della tecnoscienza2011In: Trasformare conoscenza, trasferire tecnologia. Dizionario critico delle scienze sociali sulla trasformazione produttiva della conoscenza / [ed] Andrea Bonaccorsi and MassimianoBucchi, Venezia: Marsilio , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Doing (Open) Innovation through Networking2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Fiori in famiglia. Storia e storie di Eva Mameli Calvino; Pannocchie da Nobel. Storia e storie di Barbara McClintock2015In: About Gender-Rivista internazionale di studi di genere, ISSN 2279-5057, Vol. 4, no 7, 277-279 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gender and Technology: Mind the Gap!2009In: Organizational Communication and Sustainable Development: ICTs for Mobility / [ed] Anette Hallin and Tina Karrbom-Gustavsson, Hershey PA: IGI Publishing-Information Science Reference , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    I parchi scientifico-tecnologici: da strutture insediative a infrastrutture connettive2014In: Polis, ISSN 1120-9488, Vol. 28, no 3, 393-416 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Narrare il cambiamento, organizzare il significato2011In: Sociologia del Lavoro-La ricerca sociologica e i temi del lavoro / [ed] Michele La Rosa, Milano: Franco Angeli , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Narratives on platform: stories for women in computer science2008In: International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Lifelong Learning, ISSN 1560-4624, Vol. 18, no 2, 197-213 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Reflexivity in Action in the Era of “Active Aging”2017In: Reflexivity in Action in the Era of “Active Aging”, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    STS and Design2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Technology, Culture, Family. Influences on Home Life2013In: Tecnoscienza. Italian Journal of Science & Technology Studies, ISSN 2038-3460, Vol. 4, no 1, 188-191 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Panel on "Ageing and Technologies"2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ageing and Assistive Technologies: An Epistemological Framework2016In: Beyond Interpretivism? New Encounters with Technology and organisation, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. University of Trento, Italy.
    De Angeli, Antonella
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Scaling up participatory design2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    De Angeli, Antonella
    University of Lincoln, UK; University of Trento, Italy.
    Tonolli, Linda
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Ubiquitous technologies for older people2017In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 21, no 3, 607-619 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a close reading of work in ubicomp of applications for older people. Starting from three lines of enquiry defined in the inaugural issue of this journal, we discuss how ubicomp research has presented the relationship between technologies and older users. We base our reasoning on a review of papers published in Personal and Ubiquitous Computing(1997–2014). The lines of enquiry refer to paradigms (functional vs. sociotechnical), users(stereotype and involvement), and contexts (indoor and/or outdoor). These themes address the presentation of SUITCASE project (SUstainable Integrated & Territorial CAre SErvices). This is a two-year research on care services for older citizens within the smart home construct. We develop an initial framework that not only provides a cohesive view of technologies for older people, but also serves as a salient guideline for reflective design which extends beyond the target population. This framework may also address future design projects, funding schemes, and editorial policies.

  • 46.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Murgia, Annalisa
    Poggio, Barbara
    Traiettorie ed intrecci nelle storie di carriera di uomini e donne. Una lettura di genere delle transizioni tra lavoro e non lavoro2008In: Sociologia del Lavoro, no 110, 201-212 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Tonolli, Lista
    University of Trento, Italy.
    D'Andrea, Vincenzo
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Subversive Participatory Design: Reflections on a case-study2016In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, volume 2: PDC '16 Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Interactive Exhibitions, Workshops, 2016, Vol. 2, 53-56 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    his paper grounds in a research experience for engaging older people as co-designers of several wearable and in-house technologies. We start by describing a case study that is a pre-commercial procurement aimed at developing innovative services for the welfare of citizens, with a focus on older people. We present and discuss the qualitative data gathered on the occasion of a bodystorming with two groups of participants. The analysis led to the identification of the "aesthetic appropriateness", the "social sensitivity", and the "gender awareness" as three different dimensions that affected the acceptability of the technological devices. This approach created the conditions for instantiating the subversive power of participation. At the same time, such a subversion proved the authenticity of the participatory process. By drawing on this project, the purpose of the paper is to further our understanding of the conditions for Participatory Design.

  • 48.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. IMIT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Is there leadership in a fluid world?: Exploring the ongoing production of direction in organizingIn: Leadership, ISSN 1742-7150, E-ISSN 1742-7169Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the idea of leadership being a process is clearly stated in leadership definitions, most researchers focus on individuals rather than observing and studying processes. This contradiction has been highlighted by a number of scholars turning to leadership processes and practices, thereby drawing attention to the interactional and social aspects of the phenomenon. Such contributions mostly take process perspectives in which entities still play an important role. In this article, I therefore aim at contributing to leadership studies based on a process ontology by exploring one central aspect of leadership work, the production of direction, processually. I do so by building on geographer Massey’s conception of space, thus adding a spatial dimension that enables me to conceptualize direction as the development of an evolving relational configuration. In order to empirically explore such a conceptualization, two constructs are proposed: the construction of positions and the construction of issues. The reading of leadership work thus produced leads me to suggest ‘clearing for action’ as a means of conveying the spatio-temporal and constructive (reality constructing) character of leadership work.

  • 49.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    ‘Placing the organisation’: Studying the communicative constitution of organisation as the production of place2015In: APROS/EGOS 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I want to add to studies exploring how ‘organisations’ are ‘made real’, how they are made present and materialised (Cooren, Brummans, & Charrieras, 2008) by focusing on the spatial dimension of such processes (Vásquez and Cooren, 2013). Leaning on Doreen Massey’s work on space and place (2005), I propose that the processes making ‘the organisation’ present may be studied as processes producing a specific (but contested) place (‘the organisation’) and I empirically explore such a possibility. This way, the relational and material character of such an achievement, the role played by co-evolving trajectories, is foregrounded. In my analysis I focus on how the production of an organisation as a place is strengthened through the ongoing production of other places (the ‘landscape’ (Cooren et al. , 2008)). In particular, given the empirical case analysed, it is possible to see how the production of certain organisations (outdoors industry) is intertwined with the production of ‘Sweden’ as a place (or in other word, with ethnicity constructions). This enables to foreground also power dimensions that make such a process a ‘powerfull’ rather than neutral process. 

  • 50.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Relational leadership2015In: Leadership: Contemporary critical perspectives / [ed] Carroll, Ford, Taylor, London: Sage Publications, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
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