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  • 1.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet.
    Cornefjord, Michael
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Ohrvik, John
    Linton, Steven J
    Psychosocial stress factors among patients with lumbar disc herniation, scheduled for disc surgery in comparison with patients scheduled for arthroscopic knee surgery.2007In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 961-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Returning to work after disc surgery appears to be more heavily influenced by psychological aspects of work than by MR-identified morphological alterations. It is still not known whether psychosocial factors of importance for outcome after disc surgery are present preoperatively or develop in the postoperative phase. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of work-related stress, life satisfaction and demanding life events, among patients undergoing first-time surgery for lumbar disc herniation in comparison with patients scheduled for arthroscopic knee surgery. Sixty-nine patients with disc herniation and 162 patients awaiting arthroscopy were included in the study, during the time period March 2003 to May 2005. Sixty-two percent of the disc patients had been on sick leave for an average of 7.8 months and 14 percent of the knee patients had been on sick leave for an average of 4.2 months. The psychosocial factors were investigated preoperatively using a questionnaire, which was a combination of the questionnaire of quality of work competence (QWC), life satisfaction (LiSat9) and life events as a modification of the social readjustment scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of work-related stress or the occurrence of demanding life events. The disc patients were significantly less satisfied with functions highly inter-related to pain and discomfort, such as present work situation, leisure-time, activities of daily living (ADL) function and sleep. Patients with disc herniation on sick leave were significantly less satisfied with their present work situation than knee patients on sick leave; this sub-group of patients with disc herniation also reported significantly higher expectations in relation to future job satisfaction than knee patients. The results indicate that psychosocial stress is not more pronounced preoperatively in this selected group of disc patients, without co-morbidity waiting for first-time disc surgery, than among knee patients awaiting arthroscopy. It was notable that the disc patients had high expectations in terms of improved job satisfaction after treatment by surgery.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Linton, Steven J
    Örebro universitet.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nilsson, Olle
    Cornefjord, Michael
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Clinic-based training in comparison to home-based training after first-time lumbar disc surgery: a randomised controlled trial.2009In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 398-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effectiveness of physiotherapy after first-time lumbar disc surgery is still largely unknown. Studies in this field are heterogeneous and behavioural treatment principles have only been evaluated in one earlier study. The aim of this randomised study was to compare clinic-based physiotherapy with a behavioural approach to a home-based training programme regarding back disability, activity level, behavioural aspects, pain and global health measures. A total of 59 lumbar disc patients without any previous spine surgery or comorbidity participated in the study. Clinic-based physiotherapy with a behavioural approach was compared to home-based training 3 and 12 months after surgery. Additionally, the home training group was followed up 3 months after surgery by a structured telephone interview evaluating adherence to the exercise programme. Outcome measures were: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), physical activity level, kinesiophobia, coping, pain, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Treatment compliance was high in both groups. There were no differences between the two groups regarding back pain disability measured by ODI 3 and 12 months after surgery. However, back pain reduction and increase in quality of life were significantly higher in the home-based training group. The patients in the clinic-based training group had significantly higher activity levels 12 months after surgery and were significantly more satisfied with physiotherapy care 3 months after surgery compared to the home-based training group. Rehabilitation after first-time lumbar disc surgery can be based on home training as long as the patients receive both careful instructions from a physiotherapist and strategies for active pain coping, and have access to the physiotherapist if questions regarding training arise. This might be a convenient treatment arrangement for most patients.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Centrum för klinisk forskning LTV.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Öhrvik, John
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Associations among pain, disability and psychosocial factors and the predictive value of expectations on returning to work in patients who undergo lumbar disc surgery.2016In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 296-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    PURPOSE:

    The aim of this study was to describe the associations among pain, disability and psychosocial factors preoperatively as well as 3 and 24 months later for patients who undergo first time discectomy and to analyse the predictive value of psychosocial factors on the outcome 24 months after surgery.

    METHODS:

    Fifty-nine patients, 41 % women, with a mean age of 40 years and without comorbidities were included, of whom 56 responded to the 24-month follow-up; at that point, they were divided into patients with complaints (C, n = 36) and patients without complaints (NC, n = 20). Correlations among the pain intensity, disability and psychosocial factors were analysed preoperatively, 3 and 24 months after discectomy, and regression analyses of psychosocial factors on the outcome at 24 months were performed.

    RESULTS:

    Psychosocial variables were weakly correlated with the pain intensity and disability preoperatively. High expectations on the return to work were predictive of both pain intensity (β = 8.0, p = 0.03) and disability (β = 9.1, p < 0.001) at 24 months. Associations between psychosocial variables and outcome variables were strengthened at the 3-month follow-up in the C group, and this association remained 24 months after surgery. Fear of movement was most strongly correlated with leg pain intensity (r s 0.64, p < 0.001) and the ability to decrease pain was the most correlated with disability (r s 0.78, p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION:

    Having high expectations on the return to work after surgery was the strongest predictor for a favourable outcome. Therefore, low preoperative expectations on return to work convey an important prognostic signal.

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