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  • 1.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    Australian Catholic Univ, Sch Allied Hlth, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia..
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Keen, Deb
    Griffith Univ, Autism Ctr Excellence, Mt Gravatt, Qld 4122, Australia..
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonkoping Univ, CHILD, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Imms, Christine
    Australian Catholic Univ, Sch Allied Hlth, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia..
    The effect of interventions aimed at improving participation outcomes for children with disabilities: a systematic review2015In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 1093-1104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM Enhancement of participation has been described as the ultimate outcome for health and educational interventions. The goal of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise studies that aimed to improve the participation outcomes of children with disabilities. METHOD Nine databases that index literature from the fields of health, psychology, and education were searched to retrieve information on research conducted with children with disabilities aged between 5 years and 18 years. Articles were included if the author(s) reported that participation was an intended outcome of the intervention. The articles included were limited to those reporting high-level primary research, as defined by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council evidence hierarchy guidelines. No restrictions were placed on the type of intervention being investigated. RESULTS Seven randomized controlled or pseudo-randomized studies were included. Only three of these studies identified participation as a primary outcome. Both individualized and group-based approaches to enhancing participation outcomes appeared to be effective. Studies of interventions with a primary focus on body function or activity level outcomes did not demonstrate an effect on participation outcomes. INTEPRETATION Few intervention studies have focused on participation as a primary outcome measure. Approaches using individually tailored education and mentoring programmes were found to enhance participation outcomes, while exercise programmes, where participation was a secondary outcome, generally demonstrated little effect.

  • 2.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    Australian Catholic Univ, Ctr Disabil & Dev Res, Fitzroy, Vic, Australia..
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonkoping Univ, CHILD, SIDR, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Keen, Deb
    Griffith Univ, Autism Ctr Excellence, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia..
    Imms, Christine
    Australian Catholic Univ, Ctr Disabil & Dev Res, Fitzroy, Vic, Australia..
    Measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and their alignment with the family of participation-related constructs: a systematic review2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 11, p. 1101-1116Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimWe aimed to identify measures used to assess the participation of disabled children and to map the measures' content to the family of participation-related constructs (fPRC) to inform future research and practice. MethodSix databases were searched to identify measures used to assess participation in health, psychology, and education research. Included studies involved children aged 0 to 18 years with a permanent impairment or developmental disability and reported use of a quantitative measure of participation. A second search sought relevant literature about each identified measure (including published manuals) to allow a comprehensive understanding of the measure. Measurement constructs of frequently reported measures were then mapped to the fPRC. ResultsFrom an initial yield of 32 767 articles, 578 reported one or more of 118 participation measures. Of these, 51 measures were reported in more than one article (our criterion) and were therefore eligible for mapping to the fPRC. Twenty-one measures quantified aspects of participation attendance, 10 quantified aspects of involvement as discrete scales, and four quantified attendance and involvement in a manner that could not be separated. InterpretationImproved understanding of participation and its related constructs is developing rapidly; thoughtful selection of measures in research is critical to further our knowledge base.

  • 3.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wahlstrom, Ulla
    Children & Youths Habilitat Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mini-MACS: development of the Manual Ability Classification System for children younger than 4 years of age with signs of cerebral palsy2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 72-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM To develop the Mini-Manual Ability Classification System (Mini-MACS) and to evaluate the extent to which its ratings are valid and reliable when children younger than 4 years are rated by their parents and therapists. METHOD The Mini-MACS was created by making adjustments to the MACS. The development involved a pilot project, consensus discussions within an expert group, and the creation of a test version of the Mini-MACS that was evaluated for content validity and interrater reliability. A convenience sample of 61 children with signs of cerebral palsy aged 12 to 51 months (mean age 30.2 mo [SD 10.1]) were classified by one parent and two occupational therapists across a total of 64 assessments. Agreement between the parents' and therapists' ratings was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the percentage of agreement. RESULTS The first sentence of the five levels in the MACS was kept, but other descriptions within the Mini-MACS were adjusted to be more relevant for the younger age group. The ICC between parents and therapists was 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79-0.92), and for the two therapists it was 0.97 (95% CI 0.78-0.92). Most parents and therapists found the descriptions in the Mini-MACS suitable and easy to understand. INTERPRETATION The Mini-MACS seems applicable for children from 1 to 4 years of age.

  • 4.
    Imms, Christine
    et al.
    Australian Catholic Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Sch Allied Hlth, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia.;Australian Catholic Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Ctr Disabil & Dev Res, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia..
    Adair, Brooke
    Australian Catholic Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Sch Allied Hlth, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia.;Australian Catholic Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Ctr Disabil & Dev Res, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia..
    Keen, Deb
    Griffith Univ, Autism Ctr Excellence, Mt Gravatt, Qld 4122, Australia..
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    Australian Catholic Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Sch Allied Hlth, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia.;Australian Catholic Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Ctr Disabil & Dev Res, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia.;McMaster Univ, Dept Pediat, Hamilton, ON, Canada.;McMaster Univ, CanChild Ctr Childhood Disabil Res, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, SIDR, CHILD, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    'Participation': a systematic review of language, definitions, and constructs used in intervention research with children with disabilities2016In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 29-38Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM Improving participation of children with disabilities is a priority; however, the participation construct lacks clarity. This systematic review investigated how researchers defined 'participation' and the language used in participation intervention research. METHOD Nine health and education databases were searched for intervention studies of children with disabilities that included a participation outcome. Quantitative data were extracted using a customized form, and participation text data were extracted verbatim. Themes were derived using a thematic coding approach. These participation themes were applied to the outcome measures used in the included studies to compare participation language with the methods used to quantify participation changes. RESULTS Of the 2257 articles retrieved, 25 were included in this review. Five participation themes and nine subthemes were developed. Two themes, attendance and involvement, were directly related to the participation construct. Three additional themes described related concepts: preferences, activity competence, and sense of self. INTERPRETATION Attendance and involvement seem to describe the essence of the participation concept. The related themes may provide important avenues to enhance participation outcomes. This review highlighted the need for researchers to define the construct under investigation clearly and select measures carefully, as measurement choice is the mechanism through which the concept is operationalized in research.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
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  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
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