https://www.mdu.se/

mdu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Larsson, J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala University; Örebro universitet.
    How excellent anaesthetists perform in the operating theatre: a qualitative study on non-technical skills2013In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Teaching trainees to become competent professionals who can keep the complex system of anaesthesia safe is important. From a safety point of view, non-technical skills such as smooth cooperation and good communication deserve as much attention as theoretical knowledge and practical skills, which by tradition have dominated training programmes in anaesthesiology. This study aimed to describe the way excellent anaesthetists act in the operating theatre, as seen by experienced anaesthesia nurses.                                                                                                     

    Methods The study had a descriptive and qualitative design. Five focus group interviews with three or four experienced Swedish anaesthesia nurses in each group were conducted. Interviews were analysed by using a qualitative method, looking for common themes.                                                                                                                  

    Results Six themes were found: (A) structured, responsible, and focused way of approaching work tasks; (B) clear and informative, briefing the team about the action plan before induction; (C) humble to the complexity of anaesthesia, admitting own fallibility; (D) patient-centred, having a personal contact with the patient before induction; (D) fluent in practical work without losing overview; and (F) calm and clear in critical situations, being able to change to a strong leading style.                                                                                                                  

    Conclusions Experienced anaesthesia nurses gave nuanced descriptions of how excellent anaesthetists behave and perform. These aspects of the anaesthetist's work often attract too little attention in specialist training, notwithstanding their importance for safety and fluency at work. Creating role models based on studies like the present one could be one way of increasing safety in anaesthesia.   

  • 2.
    Larsson, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Rosenqvisr, urban
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Anaesthetists understand their work in different ways – Reply2004In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 303-304Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Larsson, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala Academic Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger
    University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Eva
    University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rosenqvist, Urban
    University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Trainee anaesthetists understand their work in different ways: implications for specialist education2004In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 381-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Traditionally, programmes for specialist educationin anaesthesia and intensive care have been based on lists ofattributes such as skills and knowledge. However, modern researchin the science of teaching has shown that competence developmentis linked to changes in the way professionals understand theirwork. The aim of this study was to define the different waysin which trainee anaesthetists understand their work.

    Methods. Nineteen Swedish trainee anaesthetists were interviewed.The interviews sought the answers to three open-ended questions.(i) When do you feel you have been successful in your work?(ii) What is difficult or what hinders you in your work? (iii)What is the core of your anaesthesia work? Transcripts of theinterviews were analysed by a phenomenographic approach, a researchmethod aiming to determine the various ways a group of peopleunderstand a phenomenon.

    Results. Six ways of understanding their work were defined:giving anaesthesia according to a standard plan; taking responsibilityfor the patient’s vital functions; minimizing the patient’ssuffering and making them feel safe; giving service to specialistdoctors to facilitate their care of patients; organizing andleading the operating theatre and team; and developing one’sown competence, using the experience gained from every new patientfor learning.

    Conclusions. Trainee anaesthetists understand their work indifferent ways. The trainee’s understanding affects bothhis/her way of performing work tasks and how he/she developsnew competences. A major task for teachers of anaesthesia isto create learning situations whereby trainees can focus onnew aspects of their professional work and thus develop newways of understanding it.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning.
    Rosenqvist, Urban
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning.
    Burdened by training not by anaesthesia2008In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 100, no 4, p. 560-561Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Larsson, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning, Sweden.
    Rosenqvist, Urban
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning, Sweden.
    Enjoying work or burdened by it? How anaesthetists experience and handle difficulties at work: a qualitative study2007In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 493-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore difficulties at work fromanaesthetists’ own perspective and to examine how anaesthetistshandle and cope with situations that are perceived as difficultand potentially stressful.

    Methods: Two sets of interviews were conducted with 19 specialist anaesthetistsin Sweden. The first set of interviews aimed at finding howthe anaesthetists experienced difficulties at work. It consistedof in-depth interviews based on one open-ended question. Weanalysed the interviews with a phenomenological method, lookingfor themes in anaesthetists’ descriptions of difficultiesat work. In the second set, the interviews were semi-structuredwith open-ended questions, based on themes found in the firstinterview set. These interviews aimed at exploring how the intervieweesdescribed their ways of handling difficulties and how they copedwith potentially stressful situations.

    Results: Analysis of the first set of interviews resulted in five themes,describing how the anaesthetists experienced difficulties atwork. All interviewees talked about difficulties related tomore than one of the themes. The second set of interviews revealedtwo main categories of ways of handling difficulties. First,problem solving consisted of descriptions of methods for handlingdifficult situations which aimed at solving problems, and second,coping strategies described ways of appraising potentially stressfulsituations that minimized stress, despite the problem not beingsolved.

    Conclusions: The anaesthetists interviewed in this study maintained thatthey enjoyed work and could see no external obstacles to doinga good job. They had arrived at a reconciliation of their workwith its inherent difficulties and problems. Getting accessto their coping strategies might help young anaesthetists tocome to terms with their work.

  • 6.
    MacKinnon, Ralph J.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Slater, David
    School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Pukk-Härenstam, Karin
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Adaptations to practice and resilience in a paediatric major trauma centre during a mass casualty incident2022In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 128, no 2, p. e120-e126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Innovation and human adaptation in the face of unfolding catastrophe is the cornerstone of an effective systemwide response. Capturing, analysing, and disseminating this is fundamental in developing resilience for future events. The aim of this study was to understand the characteristics of adaptations to practice early in a paediatric major trauma centre during a mass casualty incident.

    Methods

    A qualitative interview study of 40 healthcare staff at a paediatric major trauma centre in the immediate aftermath of a terrorist bombing was conducted. An inductive thematic analysis approach was used, followed by a deductive analysis of the identified adaptations informed by constructs of resilience engineering.

    Results

    Five themes of adaptations to practice that enhanced the resilient performance of the hospital were identified: teamworking; psychologically supporting patients, families, and staff; reconfiguring infrastructure; working around the hospital electronic systems; and maintaining hospital safety. Examples of resilience potential in terms of respond, monitor, anticipate, and learn are presented.

    Conclusions

    Our study shows how adaptations to practice sustained the resilient performance of a paediatric major trauma centre during a mass casualty incident. Rapid, early capture of these data during a mass casualty incident provides key insights into enhancing future emergency preparedness, response, and resilience planning.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf