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  • 1.
    Balaman, Ufuk
    et al.
    Hacettepe Üniversitesi, Ankara, Turkey.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Hacettepe Üniversitesi, Ankara, Turkey.
    The coordination of online L2 interaction and orientations to task interface for epistemic progression2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 115, p. 115-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of knowledge in social interaction has been a recent research concern across several fields and the emergence of epistemics as a concept to understand information exchanges has been facilitated mainly through conservation analytic investigations (Heritage, 2012a,b). Relative epistemic status of speakers (Heritage, 2012a) has appeared to be a layer in the multidimensional body of action and knowledge co-construction (Goodwin, 2013). Although the nature of knowledge exchange processes in mundane talk and learning settings has been described in a number of studies, such an understanding has been explored to a lesser extent in technology-mediated and online interactional environments. With this in mind,, we draw on multimodal conversation analysis to describe online video-based interactions based on a single case analysis that represents a larger corpus of 70 h of screen recordings. The findings reveal the incorporation of online interaction, screen orientations, and knowledge co-construction for task accomplishment purposes. The participants coordinate their interactions with their orientations to the task interface to enact epistemic progression, which consequently turns the interface into a layer, a semiotic field, and a screen-based resource in the course of knowledge co-construction. The results have important implications for research on online interaction and epistemics as well as for an understanding of coordination of multiple actions in geographically dispersed settings.

  • 2.
    Sert, Olcay
    Hacettepe Univ, Egitim Fak, Beytepe, Turkey..
    ‘Epistemic status check’ as an interactional phenomenon in instructed learning settings2013In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 13-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the interactional unfolding of ‘epistemic status check’ (ESC) (e.g. ‘no idea?’, or ‘you don’t know?’), which is a frequently observed feature of teacher talk in language classrooms. The paper aims at contributing to the literature of institutional interaction and classroom discourse by introducing and defining ‘ESCs’, which also will indirectly be conducive to expanding the scope of the idea of epistemic engine (Heritage, 2012a,b). An ESC can be defined as a speaker’s interpretation of another interactant’s state of knowledge, which (in the case of classrooms) can be initiated in order to pursue certain pedagogical goals when a second-pair part of an adjacency pair is delayed. It is employed subsequent to inter-turn gaps (Schegloff, 2007) that are accompanied by non-verbal cues. The study draws on 16 h of video-recorded interactions in two English language classrooms in a public school in Luxembourg. The participants are adolescent multilingual students, aged between 15 and 18, and a local teacher. The analysis was carried out using conversation analysis, by also drawing on the use of multi-semiotic resources including gaze directions, gestures, and body orientations. The findings show that teachers treat these embodied actions as displays of insufficient knowledge in classroom talk-in-interaction, and initiate ESCs subsequent to certain student non-verbal cues including gaze withdrawals, long silences, and headshakes. These displays of insufficient knowledge were found to be visual resources that the teacher uses in order to move the classroom activity forward, by first initiating an ESC, and then by allocating the turn to another student. These findings have implications for the analysis of ‘claims of insufficient knowledge’ (e.g. ‘I don’t know’) in general and their management in instructed learning environments in particular. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Sert, Olcay
    et al.
    Hacettepe Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Jacknick, Christine M.
    The City University of New York.
    Student smiles and the negotiation of epistemics in L2 classrooms2015In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 77, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the interactional unfolding of student smiles in instructed language learning settings drawing on data from both English as a Second Language and as a Foreign Language classrooms. Conversational actions performed by participants through ‘smiles’ is an under-researched area, especially in classroom settings where teachers’ and students’ smiles may serve different functions due to the institutional nature of ongoing interactions. To address this research gap, we aim at investigating the interactional unfolding of student smiles in English language classrooms based on 16 h of video-recordings in Luxembourg and 45 h of video-recordings in the US. Taking a conversation-analytic approach, we show how participants use smiles to index and resolve interactional trouble. Our analysis shows that smiles and epistemic issues in the classroom are intricately connected, and in the case of interactional trouble related to epistemic access, student smiles serve to maintain affiliation and to promote the progressivity of talk. The findings of the paper have implications for understanding the interactional unfolding of smiles in institutional interaction in general, and in classroom interaction in particular.

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