mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aronsson, Vanda
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Stockholm Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nyberg, Anna
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Can a poor psychosocial work environment and insufficient organizational resources explain the higher risk of ill-health and sickness absence in human service occupations?: Evidence from a Swedish national cohort2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 310-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate differences in burnout, self-rated health (SRH) and sickness absence between human service occupations (HSOs) and other occupations, and whether they can be attributed to differences in psychosocial work environment and organizational resources. Methods: Data were derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health, an approximately representative sample of the Swedish working population (n = 4408). Employment in HSOs, psychosocial work environment and organizational resources in 2012 predicted relative risks of sickness absence, burnout and suboptimal SRH in 2014 using modified Poisson regressions. The psychosocial work factors' and organizational resource variables' relative importance were estimated by adding them to the models one by one, and with population attributable fractions (PAFs). Results: Employment in HSOs was associated with a higher risk of sickness absence and the risk was explained by psychosocial and organizational factors, particularly high emotional demands, low work-time control and exposure to workplace violence. Employment in HSOs was not associated with burnout after sociodemographic factors were adjusted for, and furthermore not with SRH. A lower risk of suboptimal SRH was found in HSOs than in other occupations with equivalent psychosocial work environment and organizational resources. PAFs indicated that psychosocial work environment and organizational resource improvements could lead to morbidity reductions for all outcomes; emotional demands were more important in HSOs. Conclusions: HSOs had higher risks of sickness absence and burnout than other occupations. The most important work factors to address were high emotional demands, low work-time control, and exposure to workplace violence.

  • 2.
    Clarke, Marina
    et al.
    Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town , South Africa; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dick, Judy
    Medical Research Council of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Bogg, Lennart
    Mälardalen University, School of Business. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cost-effectiveness analysis of an alternative tuberculosis management strategy for permanent farm dwellers in South Africa amidst health service contraction2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TB control has suffered from budget reductions in South Africa. It is critically important to develop cost-effective strategies to reduce the TB burden. Costs to public budgets can be substantially reduced while maintaining or improving case detection and treatment outcomes, by using farm-based LHWs.

  • 3.
    Gusdal, Annelie K
    et al.
    Nursing Care RandD Unit, Centre for Public Health, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Beckman, Christel
    Nursing Care RandD Unit, Centre for Public Health, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Rolf
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Global Health (IHCAR), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Törnkvist, Lena
    Nursing Care RandD Unit, Centre for Public Health, Huddinge, Sweden.
    District nurses' use for an assessment tool in their daily work with elderly patients' medication management2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 354-360, article id 21273229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the capability of the Safe Medication Assessment (SMA) tool in identifying factors highly related to unsafe medication management among elderly patients and to investigate the district nurses' (DNs) opinions of the SMA's usefulness as a tool in their daily primary healthcare practice. Introduction: Elderly patients who experience many medical conditions often use multiple drugs. As well as the combined decline in physical and cognitive functions, the elderly are at high risk for medication-related problems. It is essential to develop a screening procedure to distinguish elderly at risk of an unsafe medication management. Methods: An explorative study. During a 3-6-month period, 25 voluntary DNs used SMA with 160 patients (consecutively chosen and meeting four specified criteria) in their daily practice. Furthermore, DNs responded to questions regarding SMA's usefulness. Results: The result showed that SMA had the capability to identify factors highly related to unsafe medication management among the elderly included in the study. In 64% of assessments DNs identified areas of new information and in 23% of the assessments DNs intervened. They found SMA to be satisfactory regarding its level of simplicity, relevance, completeness, intelligibility, and time for implementation. Conclusions: SMA alerted the DNs to patients' attitudes about medication and empowered them in identifying elderly patients who had unsafe medication management. SMA was also perceived as a useful assessment tool by the DNs.

  • 4.
    Haglund, Bo JA
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tillgren, Per
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Milestones in Nordic Health Promotion Research2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 20_suppl, p. 7-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the storytelling tradition and analyses of conference material, this article provides an overview of the evolving Nordic Health Promotion Research Network (NHPRN) and its conferences over the last 20 years. The story goes from the planning of the first conference in Bergen, Norway, back in 1996 to the eighth conference in Jyväskylä, Finland, in 2016. There have been three phases of development. During the first phase, 1996–2007, the five first conferences were initiated and implemented by departments of public health in the Nordic countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative centres of Health Promotion in Bergen University and a group at Karolinska Institute, Department of Social Medicine, creating supportive environments for health in Stockholm played key roles in initiating and supporting NHPRN. During the second phase, 2007–2014, the network was strengthened and supported by the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV) in Gothenburg. The third phase started when NHV closed down in 2015 and networking activities were transferred to the European Office of WHO in Copenhagen. The Nordic Health Promotion Research Conference series has served several purposes and will continue to do so. They are important Nordic meeting places, stimulating Health Promotion research, as well as explicitly managing ongoing concerns in the international Health Promotion community. This is reflected in the shift of foci over time. The content of the conferences has been highly responsive to whatever challenges are particularly relevant at different points in time, while also contributing to developing Health Promotion as a discipline, given that every conference has built on the previous ones.

  • 5.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; SIMSEG, Institute for Analytical Sociology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Using register data to deduce patterns of social exchange2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 17_suppl, p. 56-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel method for deducting propensities for social exchange between individuals based on the choices they make, and based on factors such as country of origin, sex, school grades and socioeconomic background. The objective here is to disentangle the effect of social ties from the other factors, in order to find patterns of social exchange. This is done through a control-treatment design on analysing available data, where the 'treatment' is similarity of choices between socially connected individuals, and the control is similarity of choices between non-connected individuals. Structural dependencies are controlled for and effects from different classes are pooled through a mix of methods from network and meta-analysis. The method is demonstrated and tested on Swedish register data on students at upper secondary school. The results show that having similar grades is a predictor of social exchange. Also, previous results from Norwegian data are replicated, showing that students cluster based on country of origin. 

  • 6. Johnsson, Isabel
    et al.
    Tillgren, Per
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Understanding and interpreting the concept of physical activity - a focus group study among Swedish women2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Strong epidemiological evidence indicates that physical activity is highly beneficial for health. To follow physical activity trends and correctly target interventions, feasible, reliable and valid assessment methods are needed. This paper examines Swedish women's understanding and interpretations of the concepts of physical activity and exercise, as well as different intensity modifiers used in the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Methods: Four focus group discussions were conducted with 27 women in total aged 35 to 69 (median 52). Responses and accompanying discussion were analysed according to the principles for qualitative content analysis including both manifest and latent content in the text. Findings: Understanding of physical activity and exercise depends on differences in people's experiences. The women felt physical activity and exercise were different concepts, but ultimately agreed that physical activity and exercise were terms along a continuum of movement experiences, from informal to formal settings. The interpretations of the intensity modifiers "moderate'' and "vigorous'' were close to the formal definitions in IPAQ. However the Swedish terms "mattligt anstrangande'' (moderate intensity) and ''mycket anstrangande'' (vigorous intensity) are the best possible terms and should be used in IPAQ. Conclusions: There are different interpretations of the meaning of the key concepts in IPAQ that must be considered. The use of a qualitative approach when developing physical activity questionnaires can lead to more feasible, reliable and valid assessment methods as well as a clearer message for health-enhancing physical activity recommendations. 

  • 7.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berglund, A.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, C.
    Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, United States.
    Edlund, B.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Aarts, C.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sylvén, S.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Depressive symptoms postpartum among parents are associated with marital separation: a Swedish cohort study2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 660-668Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Edlund, B.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Aarts, C.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Association between mothers' and fathers' depressive symptoms, sense of coherence and perception of their child's temperament in early parenthood in Sweden2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Aims: To examine whether there was any association between mothers' and fathers' post-partum depressive symptoms and sense of coherence and perception of their child's temperament. The hypotheses were that parents with depressive symptoms: 1) have more often a poor sense of coherence, and 2) perceive their child's temperament to be more difficult than parents without depressive symptoms. Methods: A total of 401 Swedish-speaking couples, who were the parents of children born through the years 2004-2006 in the northern part of the county of Vastmanland, Sweden, were invited to participate in the study. The parents answered 3 questionnaires including: at inclusion of the study: demographic data (n = 393 couples); at 3 months: the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Sense of Coherence Scale (n = 308 couples); and at 18 months: the Infant Characteristics Questionnaire (n = 272 couples). Results: Depressive symptoms measured at 3 months, were reported by 17.7% of mothers and 8.7% of fathers, and correlated significantly between mothers and fathers within couples (rho = 0.165, p = 0.003). Mothers and fathers with depressive symptoms had a poorer sense of coherence (p < 0.001, p < 0.001) and perceived their child's temperament as more difficult than mothers and fathers without depressive symptoms at 3 (p = 0.028, p < 0.001) and 18 months (p = 0.145, p = 0.012 respectively). Conclusions: Early parenthood has been studied thoroughly in mothers, but few studies have included fathers. Identifying problems in early parenthood could help predict later problems exhibited by the preschool child, which might be prevented by supportive programmes.

  • 9.
    Larm, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital Västerås, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Åslund, C.
    Centre for Clinical Research, Västmanland County Hospital Västerås, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Starrin, B.
    Department for Social Studies, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, K. W.
    Centre for Clinical Research, Västmanland County Hospital Västerås, Vasteras, Sweden.
    How are social capital and sense of coherence associated with hazardous alcohol use?: Findings from a large population-based Swedish sample of adults2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: This study examined whether social capital and a sense of coherence are associated with hazardous alcohol use in a large population-based Swedish sample. In particular, the objectives were (a) to examine which of five subdimensions of social capital is associated with hazardous alcohol use, (b) to investigate the moderating role of sense of coherence and (c) to examine possible sex differences. Methods: A postal survey was distributed to a sample of respondents (aged 18-84 years) from five Swedish counties that was stratified by sex, age and city; 40,674 (59.2%) participants responded, of which 45.5% were men and 54.5% were women with a mean±SD age of 53.8±17.9 years. Results: Structural dimensions of social capital were associated with an increased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women, whereas the increased probability associated with cognitive dimensions occurred mostly among women. Sense of coherence was robustly associated with a decreased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women. There were few moderating effects of sense of coherence and sex differences emerged mainly for the cognitive dimension of social capital. Conclusions: Associations between social capital dimensions and hazardous alcohol use were partly sex-specific, whereas the benefits of a sense of coherence accrued to both sexes. Social capital dimensions and sense of coherence were generally unrelated to each other. Only associations between the cognitive dimensions of social capital and hazardous alcohol use differed by sex.

  • 10.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Granström, Fredrik
    R&D Centre/Centre for Clinical Research, Sörmland County Council, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Sahlqvist, Lotta
    R&D Centre/Centre for Clinical Research, Sörmland County Council, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Tillgren, Per
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Aspects of health, physical/leisure activities, work and socio-demographics associated with pet ownership in Sweden2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 56-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the work presented here was to explore differences between pet owners and non-pet-owners concerning aspects of health, physical/leisure activities, work and socio-demographics. METHODS: The study was based on nationally representative data from the Swedish population (n = 43,589). Associations between pet ownership and background variables were investigated using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 39,995 respondents were included in the analysis (non-pet-owners = 25,006; pet owners = 14,989). Pet ownership was associated with both positive and negative aspects of health, physical/leisure activities and socio-demographics. Pet owners had better general health but suffered more from mental health problems than non-pet-owners. Their leisure activities involved a greater interest in nature life and/or gardening than those of non-pet-owners. The logistic regression analysis showed that people who were self-employed, in the age range 35 to 49, of female sex, and suffering from pain in the head, neck and shoulders were more likely to own a pet than others. People physically active at a level sufficient to have a positive effect on their health more often owned a pet than people who were less active. CONCLUSIONS: Pet owners differ from non-pet-owners in aspects of socio-demographics, health, physical/leisure activities and work situation. This study, based on a general regional population in Sweden, showed differences of both a positive and a negative kind between non-pet-owners and pet owners concerning aspects of health, physical and leisure activities, and work situation.

  • 11.
    Nordgren, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Social support, self-rated health and low mood in people on sick leave due to heart failure: a cross-sectional study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 606-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate social support in relation to self-rated health and the prevalence of low mood in people on sick leave due to heart failure. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used, and 590 individuals on sick leave due to heart failure in Sweden responded to the postal questionnaire. The questions therein concerned received and needed functional and structural support from managers, work colleagues, families and friends. Multivariate analyses were conducted. Results: The variables of income and needed support from family contributed significantly and negatively to self-rated health. Those who perceived that they needed more support from their manager reported experiencing low mood more frequently. Conclusions: The results showed a negative relation between manager support and low mood. Thus, support from managers and perceptions of low mood during sick leave are negatively associated, however, we do not know anything about the causality of this association. The results also indicated that needed support from family was negatively associated with self-rated health. The results also highlighted a multidimensional frailty in people with heart failure that needs to be recognized in future research as well as in clinical practice.

  • 12.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Söderbäck, Maja
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Perceptions of the use of khat among Somali immigrants living in Swedish society2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of Somali immigrants’ perceptions of the use of khat living in Swedish society. Using khat is illegal in Sweden

    Methods: A phenomenographic design was used to capture different perception of using khat. Fourteen interviews were conducted with both men and women. The information was subjected to phenomenographic analysis.

    Findings: Perceptions of the habit of chewing khat among Somalis living in Sweden vary. The use of khat is perceived as a kind of food or as a drug. To use khat is perceived as having a physical impact on individual health, as well as an impact on social and family life. Using khat also has an impact on people’s time, because time is needed to indulge the habit. Furthermore, using khat is perceived as a medium for cultural and community cohesiveness. The Somalis prefered preventive measures in place to counter the use of khat in Sweden

    Conclusions: The use of a phenomenographic design which captured the variation in perceptions of the habit of using khat among Somali immigrants’ living in Swedish society is helpful in guiding individual strategies in health promotion activities.

  • 13.
    Ringsberg, K. C.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olander, E.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Health, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Tillgren, Per
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Thualagant, N.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Trollvik, A.
    University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Concerns and future challenges of health literacy in the Nordic countries - From the point of view of health promotion practitioners and researchers2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 20_suppl, p. 107-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health literacy is an essential social determinant for promoting and maintaining the health of a population. Aim: From a health promotion perspective, explore health literacy issues, concerns and future challenges among Nordic practitioners and researchers. Methods: Data were collected in a workshop at the 8th Nordic Health Promotion Conference, and in a literature review, with articles from five databases. The search included title and abstract with the search terms health literacy* and health literacy as a MeSH term and all the Nordic countries. Qualitative and quantitative analysis were used. Results: Twenty-five persons participated in the workshop. The discussions were summarized in six themes: concept of health literacy in national language; risk of victim blaming; measuring health literacy; content in school curricula on health literacy; new technologies for information and communication; communication and collaboration between different actors in support of health. Forty-three articles on health literacy were identified, mainly conducted within three fields: development, test and adaptation of instruments for measuring health literacy; measurement of health literacy among patients, or other defined target groups and on populations; and developing and evaluating methods/tools for the training of personnel groups or different target groups. Conclusions: There is a need for further studies providing a more in-depth understanding of the health literacy concept, knowledge on how to measure health literacy, ethical aspects, application in intersectoral collaboration as well as the adaptation to new technologies for information and communication in education supporting health literacy. As health literacy is an essential social health determinant, a concern and a future challenge must be, to make the health literacy concept familiar and visible in health promotion policies, research and practice such as health education. 

  • 14.
    Rooth, Hetty
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Forinder, U.
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Söderbäck, Maja
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Viitasara, E.
    Piuva, K.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Trusted and doubted: Discourses of parenting training in two Swedish official inquiries, 1947 and 20082018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 20_suppl, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse discourses of parenting training in official inquires in Sweden that explicitly deal with the bringing up of children and parental education and how the representations of the problems and their solutions affect parental subject positions in the early welfare state and at the onset of the 21st century. Method: We carried out a discourse analysis of two public inquiries of 1947 and 2008, drawing on theories about governmentality and power regimes. Tools from political discourse analysis were used to investigate the objectives of political discourse practices. Results: Both inquiries referred to a context of change and new life demands as a problem. Concerning suggestions for solutions, there were discrepancies in parents’ estimated need of expert knowledge and in descriptions of parental capacity. In a discourse of trust and doubt, the parents in 1947 were positioned as trusted welfare partners and secure raisers of future generations, and in 2008, as doubted adults, feared to be faltering in their child-rearing tasks. Conclusions: The analysis revealed how governmental problem descriptions, reasoning about causes and suggestions of solutions influenced parents’ subject positions in a discourse of trust and doubt, and made way for governmental interventions with universal parenting training in the 21st century. 

  • 15.
    Sandmark, Helene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Health, sleep and professional career in female white-collar workers returning to work after long-term sick-listing due to minor mental disorders2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, ISSN ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 823-829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    This study is a 3-year follow up of female white-collar workers, who were on long-term sick leave in 2004 due to stress-related and minor mental disorders. The aim is to show what promotes return-to-work (RTW) and the impact of a long period of sickness absence on professional career.

    METHODS:

    The study includes a cohort of 233 women who were currently on medically certified sick leave lasting ≥90 days in 2004. A postal questionnaire was sent out after 34 months, regarding self-rated health, quality of sleep, sick-listing status, occupational status, etc.

    RESULTS:

    After 34 months, 69% of the women had fully returned to working life. One of the most salient findings is that almost half of those had changed jobs and more than a third were in a new profession. Those who were back in working life rated less negative consequences of the long-term sick-listing on their professional career and their quality of sleep was better (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.50-5.60 "sleeping all night"). Self-rated health did not show significant association with RTW (OR 2.83, 95% CI 0.91-8.77). Those who had returned to working life reported more control over their lives (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.01-3.88).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The findings imply that, in work health promotion and rehabilitation and efforts to prevent sickness absence due to stress-related disorders, important factors to be considered are job mobility, changes in present work, improved sleep, and control over one's own life.

  • 16.
    Widarsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Nohlert, E.
    Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University Västmanland County Hospital, Sweden.
    Öhrvik, J.
    Uppsala Univ, Vastmanland Cty Hosp, Ctr Clin Res, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Parental stress and depressive symptoms increase the risk of separation among parents with children less than 11 years of age in Sweden.2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, p. 207-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Parental separations have become more frequent in recent decades. In Western countries, about 25% of children experience parental separation. There is a need to explore the risk factors for separation to give children an optimal childhood. The objective of the present study was to examine parental stress and depressive symptoms during early parenthood and their association with parental separation. Methods: Four hundred and seven couples completed questionnaires on depressive symptoms for 3 months and parental stress for 18 months after childbirth. Total parental stress and five sub-areas were investigated. To study the separation rate, parents’ addresses were recorded 9 to 11 years after childbirth. Results: Twenty-nine percent of the parents were separated 9 to 11 years after childbirth. Separation was associated with depressive symptoms at 3 months (mothers p =.002, fathers p =.025) and total parental stress at 18 months after childbirth (mothers p =.010, fathers p =.005). The sub-areas of parental stress, Spouse relationship problems (mothers p = <.001, fathers p =.001) and fathers’ Social isolation (p =.005), were associated with separation. In multivariable regression analyses of the parents’ separation rate 9 to 11 years after childbirth, the only significant predictor was mothers’ Spouse relationship problems (p <.001). Conclusions: The knowledge that parental stress and depressive symptoms are risk factors for separation may simplify professional support for parents in early parenting. Courses for new and expectant parents can use this knowledge to increase parents’ awareness

  • 17.
    Xu, Biao
    et al.
    School of Public Health, Fudan University, Fudan, China; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Diwan, Vinod K
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bogg, Lennart
    Mälardalen University, School of Business. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Access to tuberculosis care: what did chronic cough patients experience in the way of healthcare-seeking?2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 396-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Potential TB patients' access to TB care needs improving under DOTS. The expenses for treatment of cough are a heavy burden for the poor. Since the low-income patients first seek care at village health stations or township hospitals for cough, it is vital to involve the general health system in the DOTS project.

  • 18.
    Zander, V.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Struggling for sense of control: Everyday life with chronic pain for women of the Iraqi diaspora in Sweden2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 799-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As dispersed ethnic populations in Swedish society expand, the healthcare system need to adapt rehabilitation services according to their needs. The experiences of trauma and forced resettlement have a continuing impact on health and musculoskeletal pain, as well as the intersecting structures that prerequisite the possibilities in the new country. To understand the specific needs of women from the Iraqi diaspora in Sweden, there is a need to elucidate the effects of pain on their everyday life. Aims: To elucidate everyday life with chronic pain from the perspective of women from the Iraqi diaspora in Sweden. Methods: Qualitative interview study according to Glaser's grounded theory. Results: The results from 11 interviews suggest that pain was associated with dependency on society as well as on family. It resulted in a struggle for sense of control, framed by faith in God, influenced by the healthcare system, and with support from family. The women's testimony of lack of continuity of care, resulting in recollection of lived traumas in every visit, is a vital sign of the unconscious power relations within health care and how representatives from health care, instead of being the ones who help the women forward, become the ones who hold them back. Conclusions: The results show the importance of challenging the normative assumptions embedded in health care and treatment for patients with chronic pain and of including the voice of "others". © 2013 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  • 19.
    Zander, Viktoria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Röda korsets högskola, Sweden.
    Struggling for sense of control - everyday life with chronic pain for women of the Iraqi diaspora in Sweden.2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, p. 799-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As dispersed ethnic populations in Swedish society expand, the healthcare system need to adapt rehabilitationservices according to their needs. The experiences of trauma and forced resettlement have a continuing impact on healthand musculoskeletal pain, as well as the intersecting structures that prerequisite the possibilities in the new country. Tounderstand the specific needs of women from the Iraqi diaspora in Sweden, there is a need to elucidate the effects of painon their everyday life. Aims: To elucidate everyday life with chronic pain from the perspective of women from the Iraqidiaspora in Sweden. Methods: Qualitative interview study according to Glaser’s grounded theory. Results: The results from11 interviews suggest that pain was associated with dependency on society as well as on family. It resulted in a strugglefor sense of control, framed by faith in God, influenced by the healthcare system, and with support from family. Thewomen’s testimony of lack of continuity of care, resulting in recollection of lived traumas in every visit, is a vital sign of theunconscious power relations within health care and how representatives from health care, instead of being the ones whohelp the women forward, become the ones who hold them back.Conclusions: The results show the importance ofchallenging the normative assumptions embedded in health care and treatment for patients with chronic painand of including the voice of “others”.

  • 20.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Alexandersson, Kristina
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    "It was really nice to have someone: Lay people with musculoskeletal disorders request supportive relationships in rehabilitation.2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore the lay person's perspective on the rehabilitation process. Methods: A total of 20 interviews were conducted with women and men who had recent or more distant experience of sickness absence,vith musculoskeletal diagnoses. Grounded theory was used, which includes an inductive approach and theoretical sampling. The interviews focused on the individuals' own stories and experiences of factors that promoted or hindered the rehabilitation process. Results: The interviewees emphasized how and by whom they had been treated rather than what type of rehabilitation programmes they had attended. They focused on the importance of Supportive relationships From the private, occupational, and health care arenas. The relationship with rehabilitation agents (professionals who implemented rehabilitation) was described as having either supportive or non-supportive qualities. Based on the interviewees' descriptions. a model was developed on the socioemotional qualities of the rehabilitation agent. The most promoting factor in the rehabilitation process was to have a professional mentor that is a rehabilitation agent who combines a supportive approach with individually chosen rehabilitation measures and goals. Conclusions: The lay person's perspective gave additional knowledge regarding rehabilitation and recovery from musculoskeletal disorders. The socioemotional qualities of the rehabilitation agents were emphasized by the interviewees and a model regarding these qualities was developed, This model needs to be tested further. A clinical implication of the present study is the need for rehabilitation agents to develop their communication skills further.

  • 21.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Borg, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Wide, Peter
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Alexandersson, Kristina
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Clients’ perceptions of contact with professionals within Health Care and Social Insurance offices2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: An increasing number of people interact with professionals within healthcare and social insurance offices during periods of sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders. Knowledge of clients' perceptions of such contact is scarce. This study analysed clients' perceptions of theircontact with professionals within healthcare and social insurance offices. Methods: A cohort study was conducted in the municipality of Linköping, Sweden. Participants were all citizens who in 1985 were aged 25-34 years and had at least one new sick-leave spell due to back, neck, or shoulder diagnoses exceeding 28 days (n = 213). In 1996, 11 years after inclusion, a questionnaire about perception of contact withprofessionals, self-perceived health, and mental health was administered. Register data on sickness absence and disability pension from 1985-96 were also obtained. Results: Factor analysis indicated the existence of three dimensions of contact with professionals: supportive treatment, distant treatment, and empowering treatment. Women perceived their contact with both social insurance officers and healthcare professionals as more supportive than did the men. Respondents with disability pensions perceived their contact with social insurance officers as more supportive and empowering than persons without disability pensions. Respondents with mental health problems perceived their contact with both types ofprofessionals as more distant. Respondents with neck/shoulder diagnoses perceived their contact with healthcare professionals as more empowering than respondents with low back diagnoses. Conclusion: There was a relationship between clients' perceptions of contact withprofessionals and the sex, disability pension, diagnosis, and mental health of clients.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf