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  • 1.
    Balter, Olle
    et al.
    Royal Inst Technol, Sch Comp Sci & Commun, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fondell, Elinor
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Osher Ctr Integrat Med, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bälter, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Feedback in web-based questionnaires as incentive to increase compliance in studies on lifestyle factors2012Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, nr 6, s. 982-988Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We explored the use of feedback in interactive web-based questionnaires for collecting data on lifestyle factors in epidemiological studies. Design: Here we report from a cohort study on lifestyle factors and upper respiratory tract infections among 1805 men and women. We introduced interactivity in the form of personalized feedback and feedback on a group level regarding dietary intake, physical activity and incidence of infections in web-based questionnaires as incentives for the respondents to continue answering questions and stay in the study. Setting: The study was performed in Sweden. Subjects: All participants were randomly selected from the population registry. Results: Personalized feedback was offered in the baseline questionnaire and feedback on a group level in the five follow-up questionnaires. In total, 88% of the participants actively chose to get personalized feedback at least once in the baseline questionnaire. The follow-up questionnaires were sent by email and the overall compliance at each follow-up was 83-84%, despite only one reminder. In total, 74% completed all five follow-ups. However, the compliance was higher among those who chose feedback in the baseline questionnaire compared with those who did not choose feedback. Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to use feedback in web questionnaires and that it has the potential to increase compliance. The majority of the participants actively chose to take part in the personalized feedback in the baseline questionnaire and future research should focus on improving the design of the feedback, which may ultimately result in even higher compliance in research studies.

  • 2.
    Cuenca-Garcia, Magdalena
    et al.
    School of Medicine, University of Granada, Spain.
    Ruiz, Jonatan
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ortega, Francisco B
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Labayen, Idoia
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain.
    González Gross, Marcela
    Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Moreno, Luis
    Escuela Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain.
    Gómez-Martínez, Sonia
    Instituto del Frío, Spanish National Research Council, Spain.
    Ciarapica, Donatella
    Nationell research institute for Food and Nutrition, Rome, Italy.
    Hallström, Lena
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Wästlund, Acki
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Molnar, Dénes
    University of Pecs, Pecs, Hungary.
    Gottrand, Frédéric
    Faculté de Médecine, Université de Lille, France.
    Manios, Yannis
    Department: Nutrition & Dietetics; Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
    Widhalm, Kurt
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Kafatos, Anthony
    Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Greece.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Castillo, Manuel J
    School of Medicine, University of Granada, Spain.
    Association of breakfast consumption with objectively measured and self-reported physical activity, sedentary time and physical fitness in European adolescents: the HELENA (Healthy Lifestylein Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) Study2014Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 17, nr 10, s. 2226-2236Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the association of breakfast consumption with objectively measured and self-reported physical activity, sedentary time and physical fitness.

    Design: The HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) Cross-Sectional Study. Breakfast consumption was assessed by two non-consecutive 24 h recalls and by a 'Food Choices and Preferences' questionnaire. Physical activity, sedentary time and physical fitness components (cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness and speed/agility) were measured and self-reported. Socio-economic status was assessed by questionnaire. 

    Setting: Ten European cities. Subjects: Adolescents (n 2148; aged 12.5-17.5 years). 

    Results: Breakfast consumption was not associated with measured or self-reported physical activity. However, 24 h recall breakfast consumption was related to measured sedentary time in males and females; although results were not confirmed when using other methods to assess breakfast patterns or sedentary time. Breakfast consumption was not related to muscular fitness and speed/agility in males and females. However, male breakfast consumers had higher cardiorespiratory fitness compared with occasional breakfast consumers and breakfast skippers, while no differences were observed in females. Overall, results were consistent using different methods to assess breakfast consumption or cardiorespiratory fitness (all P <= 0.005). In addition, both male and female breakfast skippers (assessed by 24 h recall) were less likely to have high measured cardiorespiratory fitness compared with breakfast consumers (OR = 0.33; 95% CI 0.18, 0.59 and OR = 0.56; 95 % CI 0.32, 0.98, respectively). Results persisted across methods. 

    Conclusions: Skipping breakfast does not seem to be related to physical activity, sedentary time or muscular fitness and speed/agility as physical fitness components in European adolescents; yet it is associated with both measured and self-reported cardiorespiratory fitness, which extends previous findings.

  • 3.
    Fondell, Elinor
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Osher Ctr Integrat Med, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Christensen, Sara E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bälter, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Royal Inst Technol, Sch Comp Sci & Commun, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations as a measure of a healthy diet and upper respiratory tract infection2011Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, nr 5, s. 860-869Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Nordic countries have published joint dietary recommendations, the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR), since 1980. We evaluated adherence to the NNR as a measure of a healthy diet and its potential association with self-reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Design: A prospective, population-based study with a follow-up period of 4 months. Dietary intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative FFQ with ninety-six items, along with other lifestyle factors, at baseline. URTI was assessed every three weeks. A Poisson regression model was used to control for age, sex and other confounding factors. Setting: A middle-sized county in northern Sweden. Subjects: Swedish men and women (n 1509) aged 20-60 years. Results: The NNR include recommendations on macronutrient proportions, physical activity and intake of micronutrients, sodium, fibre and alcohol. We found that overall adherence to the NNR was moderately good. In addition, we found that high adherence to the NNR (>5.5 adherence points) was not associated with a lower risk of URTI (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.89, 95% CI 0.73, 1.08) compared with low adherence (<4.5 adherence points). When investigating individual components of the NNR, only high physical activity was associated with lower URTI risk (IRR=0.82, 95% CI 0.69, 0.97) whereas none of the dietary components were associated with risk of URTI. Conclusions: Overall adherence to the NNR was moderately good. Overall adherence to the NNR was not associated with URTI risk in our study. However, when investigating individual components of the NNR, we found that high physical activity was associated with lower URTI risk.

  • 4.
    Hallström, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Ruiz, Jonatan
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Labayen, Idoia
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain.
    Paterson, Emma
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Vereecken, Carine
    Department of Public Health, University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Christina Breidenassel, Christina
    fInstitut für Ernährungs- und Lebensmittelwissenschaften-Humanernährung, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität, Bonn, Germany.
    Gottrand, Frédéric
    Faculté de Médecine, Université de Lille, France.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Manios, Yannis
    Department: Nutrition & Dietetics; Harokopio University Athens, Greece.
    Mistura, Lorenza
    National Research Institute on Food and Nutrition, Italy.
    Widhalm, Kurt
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Moreno, Luis
    Escuela Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Breakfast consumption and CVD risk factors in European adolescents: The HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) Study2013Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, nr 7, s. 1296-1305Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To examine the association between breakfast consumption and CVD risk factors in European adolescents. Design Cross-sectional. Breakfast consumption was assessed by the statement 'I often skip breakfast' and categorized into 'consumer', 'occasional consumer' and 'skipper'. Blood pressure, weight, height, waist circumference, skinfold thickness, total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), TAG, insulin and glucose were measured and BMI, TC:HDL-C, LDL-C:HDL-C and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were calculated. Setting The European Union-funded HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) Study. Subjects European adolescents, aged 12·50- 17·49 years, from ten cities within the HELENA study (n 2929, n 925 with blood sample, 53 % females). Results In males, significant differences across breakfast consumption category ('consumer', 'occasional consumer' and 'skipper') were seen for age, BMI, skinfold thickness, waist circumference, cardiorespiratory fitness, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, TC:HDL-C, LDL-C:HDL-C, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and LDL-C; in females, for cardiorespiratory fitness, skinfold thickness, BMI, insulin and HOMA-IR. In overweight/obese males significant differences were also seen for TC and LDL-C, whereas no differences were observed in non-overweight males or in females regardless of weight status. Conclusions Our findings among European adolescents confirm previous data indicating that adolescents who regularly consume breakfast have lower body fat content. The results also show that regular breakfast consumption is associated with higher cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescents, and with a healthier cardiovascular profile, especially in males. Eating breakfast regularly may also negate somewhat the effect of excess adiposity on TC and LDL-C, especially in male adolescents.

  • 5.
    Hallström, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Sichert-Hellert, Wolfgang
    Research Institute of Child Nutrition, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Dortmund, Germany.
    Beghin, Laurent
    Université Lille, France.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    GRAMMATIKAKI, Eva
    Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
    Manios, Yannis
    Department: Nutrition & Dietetics; Harokopio University Athens.
    Mesana, Maribella
    Escuela Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud. Universidad de Zaragoza. Zaragoza.
    Molnar, Dénes
    University of Pecs, Pecs, Hungary.
    Dietrich, Sabina
    Devision of Clinical Nutrition and Prevention, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    PICCINELLI, Raffaela
    National Research Institute for Food and Nutrition, Rome, Italy.
    Plada, Maria
    Preventive Medicine & Nutrition Unit, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute.
    Moreno, Luis
    Escuela Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    Kersting, Mathilde
    Research Institute of Child Nutrition, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Dortmund, Germany.
    Nutritional knowledge in European adolescents: results from the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) study2011Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, nr 12, s. 2083-2091Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To build up sufficient knowledge of a ‘healthy diet’. Here, we report on the assessment of nutritional knowledge using a uniform method in a large sample of adolescents across Europe.

    Design: A cross-sectional study.

    Setting: The European multicentre HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) study conducted in 2006–2007 in ten cities in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Greece (one inland and one island city), Hungary, Italy, Spain and Sweden.

    Subjects: A total of 3546 adolescents (aged 12,5–17,5 years) completed a validated nutritional knowledge test (NKT). Socio-economic variables and anthropometric data were considered as potential confounders.

    Results: NKT scores increased with age and girls had higher scores compared with boys (62% v.59 %;P<0,0001). Scores were approximately 10% lower in ‘immigrant’ adolescents or in adolescents with ‘immigrant’ mothers. Misconceptions with respect to the sugar content in food or in beverages were found. Overall, there was no correlation between BMI values and NKT scores. After categorization according to BMI, scores increased significantly with BMI group only in boys. These differences disappeared after controlling for socio-economic status (SES). Smoking status and educational level of the mother influenced the NKT scores significantly in boys, as well as the educational levels of both parents in girls.

    Conclusions: Nutritional knowledge was modest in our sample. Interventions should be focused on the lower SES segments of the population. They should be initiated at a younger age and should be combined with environmental prevention (e.g. healthy meals in school canteens).

  • 6.
    Hallström, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Vereecken, Carine
    Department of Public Health, University Hospital, Ghent.
    Labayen, Idoia
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain.
    Ruiz, Jonatan
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute.
    Le Donne, Cinzia
    National Research Institute on Food and Nutrition, Italy.
    Cuenca, Magdalena
    School of Medicine, University of Granada.
    Gilbert, Chantal
    Campden BRI, Gloucestershire, UK.
    Gómez-Martínezi, Sonia
    Instituto del Frío, Spanish National Research Council.
    GRAMMATIKAKI, Eva
    Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University.
    Kafatos, Anthony
    Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Greece.
    Kersting, Mathilde
    Research Institute of Child Nutrition, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Dortmund, Germany.
    Manios, Yannis
    Department: Nutrition & Dietetics; Harokopio University Athens.
    Molnar, Dénes
    University of Pecs, Pecs, Hungary.
    Paterson, Emma
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute.
    Widhalm, Kurt
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna.
    DeVriendt, Tinike
    Ghent University, Department of Public Health, Ghent, Belgium.
    Moreno, Luis
    Escuela Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute.
    Breakfast Habits and their Association with Socio-demographic Factors among European Adolescents: The HELENA study.2012Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, nr 10, s. 1879-1889Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe breakfast habits on food group level in European adolescents and to investigate the associations between these habits and socio-demographic factors.

    Design: Cross-sectional study

    Setting: Secondary schools from nine European cities participating in the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle inEuropeby Nutrition in Adolescence) Study. Breakfast habits were assessed twice using a computer-based 24-h dietary recall. Adolescents who consumed breakfast on at least one recall day were classified as ‘breakfast consumers’ and adolescents who did not have anything for breakfast on either of the two recall days were considered ‘breakfast skippers’. A ‘breakfast quality-index’ to describe breakfast quality was created based on the consumption or non-consumption of: cereals/cereal products, dairy products and fruits/vegetables. The socio-demographic factors studied were sex, age, region of Europe, maternal and paternal education, family structure and family affluence.

    Subjects: 2672 adolescents (12-17 years, 53 % girls).

    Results: The majority of the adolescents reported a breakfast that scored poorly on the breakfast quality index. Older adolescents, adolescents from the southern part of Europe and adolescents from families with low socio-economic status were more likely to consume a low-quality breakfast.

    Conclusion: This study highlights the need to promote the consumption of a high-quality breakfast among adolescents, particularly in older adolescents, adolescents from southern Europe and to adolescents from families with low socio-economic status, in order to improve public health.

  • 7.
    Maes, Lea
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, University Hospital,Gent.
    Cook, Tina
    Harokopio University Athen.
    Ottovaere, C
    Department of Public Health, University Hospital, Ghent.
    Matthys, Christopher
    Department of Public Health, University Hospital, Ghent.
    Moreno, Luis
    Escuela Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    Kersting, Mathilde
    Research Institute of Child Nutrition, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Dortmund, Germany.
    Papadaki, A
    Athen.
    Manios, Yannis
    Department: Nutrition & Dietetics; Harokopio University Athens.
    Dietrich, Sabina
    Devision of Clinical Nutrition and Prevention, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Hallström, Lena
    Karolinska institutet.
    Haerens, L
    Gent.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Department of Public Health, University Hospital, Ghent.
    Vereecken, Carine
    Department of Public Health, University Hospital, Ghent.
    Pilot evaluation of the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) Food-O-Meter, a computer-tailored nutrition advice for adolescents: a study in six European cities2011Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, nr 7, s. 1292-1302Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: investigating the feasibility and impact of the Food-O-Meter, an internet based computer-tailored nutrition intervention in adolescents.

    Design: participants in the intervention condition received the computer-tailored advice at baseline and at one month. Participants in the control condition received a generic standard advice. Effects were evaluated at one month (n=621) and at three months (n=558) using multi-level modelling.

    Setting: secondary schools in 6 European cities.

    Subjects: adolescents (12-17 year old) out of the 6 centres of the HELENA study, Vienna (Austria), Ghent (Belgium), Heraklion (Crete), Dortmund (Germany), Athens (Greece) and Stockholm (Sweden), were randomised into intervention and control schools.

    Results: after 1 month students receiving the standardised advice reported an increase in their fat intake while in the intervention condition, fat intake was stable (F=4.82, P<0;05). After 3 months,  there was in the total group  a trend for an intervention effect of the tailored advice on fat intake (F=2.80, p<0.10). In the overweight group there was a clear positive effect (F=5.76, p<0.05).

    For sugared soft drinks consumption both the standardised, and the tailored advice, resulted after 3 months in a decrease in the consumption of soft drinks, but the effect was slightly greater for the standardised advice (F=4.52, p<0.05). No effects were found for other foods and nutrients.

    Conclusions: this pilot study showed that in most study centres the implementation of a web based tailored intervention was feasible and well appreciated by the adolescents. The results were modest but clear for percent energy from fat, specifically in the overweight group.

  • 8.
    Moller, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Galeone, Carlotta
    Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Epidemiol, Milan, Italy.;Univ Milan, Luigi Devoto Dept Occupat Hlth, Milan, Italy..
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Innovat & Technol CLINTEC, Oncol Ctr, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andersson, Therese M-L
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bellocco, Rino
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Stat, Milan, Italy..
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mucci, Lorelei A.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Lab, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Bälter, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    The Nordic Nutrition Recommendations and prostate cancer risk in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS) study2012Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, nr 10, s. 1897-1908Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) aim at preventing diet-associated diseases such as cancer in the Nordic countries. We evaluated adherence to the NNR in relation to prostate cancer (PC) in Swedish men, including potential interaction with a genetic risk score and with lifestyle factors. Design: Population-based case-control study (Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS), 2001-2002). Using data from a semi-quantitative FFQ, we created an NNR adherence score and estimated relative risks of PC by unconditional logistic regression. Individual score components were modelled separately and potential modifying effects were assessed on the multiplicative scale. Setting: Four regions in the central and northern parts of Sweden. Subjects: Incident PC patients (n 1386) and population controls (n 940), frequency-matched on age and region. Results: No overall association with PC was found, possibly due to the generally high adherence to the NNR score and its narrow distribution in the study population. Among individual NNR score components, high compared with low intakes of polyunsaturated fat were associated with an increased relative risk of localized PC. No formal interaction with genetic or lifestyle factors was observed, although in stratified analysis a positive association between the NNR and PC was suggested among men with a high genetic risk score but not among men with a medium or low genetic risk score. Conclusions: Our findings do not support an association between NNR adherence and PC. The suggestive interaction with the genetic risk score deserves further investigations in other study populations.

  • 9.
    Sjors, Camilla
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat MEB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedenus, Fredrik
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sjolander, Arvid
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat MEB, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tillander, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat MEB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bälter, Katarina
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford Prevent Res Ctr, Stanford, USA.
    Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food2017Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 20, nr 18, s. 3381-3393Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults. Design: Diet was assessed by 4 d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored. Setting: Sweden. Subjects: Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years. Results: Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27% in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12% in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively. Conclusions: The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.

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