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  • 1.
    Asp, Margareta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Simonsson, B.
    Competence Ctr Hlth Reg Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden.
    Peter, Larm
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Molarius, A.
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Physical mobility, physical activity, and obesity among elderly: findings from a large population-based Swedish survey2017In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 147, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine how physical activity and physical mobility are related to obesity in the elderly. Study design: A cross-sectional study of 2558 men and women aged 65 years and older who participated in a population survey in 2012 was conducted in mid-Sweden with an overall response rate of 67%. Methods: Obesity (body mass index >= 30 kg/m(2)) was based on self-reported weight and height, and physical activity and physical mobility on questionnaire data. Chi-squared test and multiple logistic regressions were used as statistical analyses. Results: The overall prevalence of obesity was 19% in women and 15% in men and decreased after the age of 75 years. A strong association between both physical activity and obesity, and physical mobility and obesity was found. The odds for obesity were higher for impaired physical mobility (odds ratio [OR] 2.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.14-3.75) than for physical inactivity (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.28-2.08) when adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status and fruit and vegetable intake. However, physical activity was associated with obesity only among elderly with physical mobility but not among those with impaired physical mobility. Conclusion: It is important to focus on making it easier for elderly with physical mobility to become or stay physically active, whereas elderly with impaired physical mobility have a higher prevalence of obesity irrespective of physical activity.

  • 2.
    Värnild, Astrid
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Tillgren, Per
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Peter, Larm
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    What types of injuries did seriously injured pedestrians and cyclists receive in a Swedish urban region in the time period 2003–2017 when Vision Zero was implemented?2020In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 181, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of the study is to examine what types of injuries that seriously injured pedestrians and cyclists received in urban road spaces from 2003 to 2017 in the Swedish region of Västmanland, when the road safety policy Vision Zero was implemented.

    Study design

    This is a cross-sectional data annually collected over a period of fifteen years.

    Methods

    Data from health care for 403 seriously injured pedestrians and cyclists were retrieved from the registry STRADA (Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition) and cross-referenced with the National Road Database to see if any Vision Zero measures had previously been implemented at the crash location. The study includes injuries from both single and multiple crashes on roads, pavements, and tracks for walking and cycling (road space). Statistical analysis was performed by descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses.

    Results

    Pedestrians were seriously injured in lower extremities more than cyclists, whereas more cyclists were seriously injured in the head. During the period, pedestriansꞌ head injuries decreased significantly, but injuries in lower extremities increased significantly. In addition, for cyclists, there was a shift from decreased probability of head injuries to increased probability of injuries in lower extremities related to increased age. For pedestrians, pavements/tracks were associated with a decreased probability of a majority of injury outcomes but for cyclists only for severe injury outcomes.

    Conclusions

    From 2003 to 2017, there was a shift among seriously injured pedestrians, with head injuries decreasing and injuries in lower extremities increasing. This shift was probably related to an ageing population in the region, given that increased age among both pedestrians and cyclists was associated with a decreased probability of head injuries but increased probability of injuries in lower extremities. On Vision Zero roads, there was a decreased probability of pedestrians receiving serious injury to more than one bodily region. An increased number of older people combined with policies for more active mobility such as walking and cycling are a challenge for road authorities in urban areas.

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