mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Breitholtz, Agneta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Snellman, Ingrid
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Carers’ ambivalence in conflict situations with older persons2013In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 226-237Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of professional carers’ experiences in caring situations when a conflict of interest arises with the older person receiving care. The findings reveal the complexity of the carers’ ambivalence when facing a conflict of interest, weighing between the older persons’ right to self-determination and external demands. The carers are alone in their ambivalence and the conclusion is that they need help and support to be more present in the encounter. The implication for this study is a person-centred practice, and to focus on people as interdependent on support carers to maintain older people’s right to self-determination in the relationship.

  • 2.
    Furingsten, L.
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden .
    Sjögren, Reet
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Forsner, M.
    Dalarna University, Sweden .
    Ethical challenges when caring for dying children2015In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 176-187Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Municipal Night Nurses’ Experience of the Meaning of Caring2009In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 599-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate municipal night registered nurses’ (RNs) experiences of the meaning of caring in nursing. The research context involved all night duty RNs working in municipal care of older people in a medium-sized municipality located in central Sweden. The meaning of caring in nursing was experienced as: caring for by advocacy, superior responsibility in caring, and consultative nursing service. The municipal night RNs’ experience of caring is interpreted as meanings in paradoxes: ‘being close at distance’, the condition of ‘being responsible with insignificant control’, and ‘being interdependently independent’. The RNs’ experience of the meaning of caring involves focusing on the care recipient by advocating their perspectives. The meaning of caring in this context is an endeavour to grasp an overall caring responsibility by responding tovocational and personal demands regarding the issue of being a RN, in guaranteeing ethical, qualitative and competent care for older people.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stenberg, Maja
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Crucial contextual attributes of nursing leadership towards a care ethics2017In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is of importance to understand and communicate caring ethics as a ground for qualitative caring environments. Research is needed on nursing attributes that are visible in nursing leadership since it may give bases for reflections related to the patterns of specific contexts. Aim: The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of crucial attributes in nursing leadership toward an ethical care of patients in psychiatric in-patient settings. Research design: The design of the study was descriptive and qualitative with a phenomenological hermeneutical approach. Participants and research context: The study comprised focus group interviews with nurses working in indoor psychiatric care who participated after giving informed consent. Ethical considerations: Since the topic and informants are not labeled as sensitive and subject to ethical approval, it is not covered by the ethics committee’s aim and purpose according to Swedish law. However, careful procedures have been followed according to ethics expressed in the Declaration of Helsinki. Findings: When identifying the thematic structures, analysis resulted in three major themes: To supply, including the following aspects: to supply evidence, to supply common space, and to supply good structures; To support, including the following aspects: to be a role model, to show appreciation and care, and to harbor; To shield, including the following aspects: to advocate, to emit non-tolerance of unethical behavior, and to reprove. Discussion: Leadership is challenging for nurses and plays an important role in ethical qualitative care. These findings should not be understood as a description about nurse manager’s role, which probably has different attributes and more focus on an organizational level. Conclusion: Making the understanding about crucial attributes explicit, the nurse may receive confirmation and recognition of crucial attributes for ethical care in order to move toward an ethical care. 

  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wigerblad, Åse
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University.
    Undignified care: Violation of patient dignity in involuntary psychiatric hospital care from a nurse's perspective2014In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 176-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient dignity in involuntary psychiatric hospital care is a complex yet central phenomenon. Research is needed on the concept of dignity's specific contextual attributes since nurses are responsible for providing dignified care in psychiatric care. The aim was to describe nurses' experiences of violation of patient dignity in clinical caring situations in involuntary psychiatric hospital care. A qualitative design with a hermeneutic approach was used to analyze and interpret data collected from group interviews. Findings reveal seven tentative themes of nurses' experiences of violations of patient dignity: patients not taken seriously, patients ignored, patients uncovered and exposed, patients physically violated, patients becoming the victims of others' superiority, patients being betrayed, and patients being predefined. Understanding the contextual experiences of nurses can shed light on the care of patients in involuntary psychiatric hospital care.

  • 6.
    Gustafsson, lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Wigerblad, Åse
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    karlstads universitet, avd. för omvårdnad.
    Un-dignifying care: Violation of patient’s dignity in involuntary psychiatric careIn: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient dignity in involuntary psychiatric hospital care is a complex yet central phenomenon. Research is needed on the concept of dignity’s specific contextual attributes since nurses are responsible for providing dignified care in psychiatric care. The aim was to describe nurses’ experiences of violation of patient dignity in clinical caring situations in involuntary psychiatric hospital care. A qualitative design with a hermeneutic approach was used to analyze and interpret data collected from group interviews. Findings reveal seven tentative themes of nurses’ experiences of violations of patient dignity; Patients not taken seriously, patients ignored, patients uncovered and exposed, patients physically violated, patients becoming the victims of others’ superiority, patients being deceived and patients being pre-defined. Understanding the contextual experiences of nurses can shed light on the care of patients in involuntary psychiatric hospital care.

  • 7.
    Heijkenskjold, Katarina Bredenhof
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    Univ Karlstad.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Univ Karlstad.
    The patient's dignity from the nurse's perspective2010In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 313-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to understand how nurses experience patients' dignity in Swedish medical wards. A hermeneutic approach and Flanagan's critical incident technique were used for data collection. Twelve nurses took part in the study. The data were analysed using hermeneutic text interpretation. The findings show that the nurses who wanted to preserve patients' dignity by seeing them as fellow beings protected the patients by stopping other nurses from performing unethical acts. They regard patients as fellow human beings, friends, and unique persons with their own history, and have the courage to see when patients' dignity is violated, although this is something they do not wish to see because it makes them feel bad. Nurses do not have the right to deny patients their dignity or value as human beings. The new understanding arrived at by the hermeneutic interpretation is that care in professional nursing must be focused on taking responsibility for and protecting patients' dignity.

  • 8.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    von Post, Iréne
    Habits in Perioperative Nursing Culture.2008In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 678-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on investigating habits in perioperative nursing culture, which are often simply accepted and not normally considered or discussed. A hermeneutical approach was chosen as the means of understanding perioperative nurses' experiences of and reflections on operating theatre culture. Focus group discussions were used to collect data, which was analysed using hermeneutical text analysis. The results revealed three main categories of habits present in perioperative nursing culture: habits that promote ethical values (by temporary friendship with patients, showing respect for each other, and spending time on reflection on ethics and caring); habits that hinder progress (by seeing the patient as a surgical case, not acknowledging colleagues, and not talking about ethics); and habits that set the cultural tone (the hidden power structure and achieving more in less time). 

  • 9.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Swall, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Sophiahemmet College University, Sweden.
    Summer Meranius, Martina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Ethical aspects of caregivers' experience with persons with dementia at mealtimes2016In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 624-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Persons with dementia are at risk of malnutrition and thus in need of assistance during mealtimes. Research suggest interventions for caregivers to learn how to facilitate mealtimes and eating, while other suggest a working environment enabling the encounter needed to provide high-quality care. However, the phenomenon of caring for this unique population needs to be elucidated from several perspectives before suggesting suitable implications that ensure their optimal health.

    OBJECTIVES: 

    To illustrate the meanings within caregivers' experiences of caring for persons with dementia during mealtime situations. We also measured weight and food intake among individuals with dementia to explain better the phenomenon of caring for them during mealtimes.

    METHODS: 

    Mixed method including focus group interviews with seven caregivers analyzed using phenomenological hermeneutics. In addition, for nine persons with dementia, weight and food intake were collected and descriptive statistics were calculated.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: 

    Ethical review was obtained from an ethics committee, and all caregivers signed a consent form after being informed on the issue of research ethics. Relatives for persons with dementia were informed and signed the consent. In addition, throughout the study, the persons' expressions were observed aiming to respect their vulnerability, integrity, and dignity.

    FINDINGS: 

    One theme emerged from interviews (struggling between having the knowledge and not the opportunity), which was built upon three subthemes (being engaged and trying; feeling abandoned and insufficient; being concerned and feeling guilty). Seven of nine persons with dementia lost a minimum of 1.3 kg of weight and ate a maximum of 49.7% of the food served.

    CONCLUSION: 

    Caregivers struggle because they have knowledge about how to provide high-quality care but are unable to provide this care due to organizational structures. The weight loss and insufficient eating among the persons with dementia may support this conclusion. Sufficient time for adequate care should be provided.

  • 10.
    Snellman, Ingrid
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    M Gedda, Kersti
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    The value ground of nursing2012In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 714-726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this literature study was to suggest a value ground for nursing anchored in two ethical principles:

    the principle of human value and the right to experience a meaningful life. Previous nursing research

    between the years 2000 and 2009 was analysed. Presented values suggested in this value ground are

    thus in line with the nursing context and science of today. Statements within ethical literature have been

    used in order to formulate arguments aimed at supporting the values that were found in the study. In

    the literature study six values were found: trust, nearness, sympathy, support, knowledge and

    responsibility. These values hold equal status and are not presented in hierarchical order. They vary due

    to the persons involved, nursing situations and cultural surroundings, but have the common requirement

    of being non-excluding. In order to implement the values within the value ground, two prerequisites are

    discussed and claimed as essential: ethical dialogue and a caring encounter between care provider and

    patients.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf