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  • 1.
    Boussaid, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Dahlgren, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Univ Karlstad.
    Nurses learn caring theory by being co-researchers in a surgical setting2012In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 393-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper present findings from research on the following issues: How nurses from surgical unit learn a caring theory by being co-researchers in a research group. The aim was to describe the learning process of the nurses when they were co-researchers in a research group. The study has a qualitative design and a hermeneutical approach. Data were collected through interviews with seven registered nurses in hospital in mid Sweden. The study shows that nurses learn caring by listening to each other. Four sub-themes emerged through the interpretation: Nurses learn caring theory by listening to each other when they are; giving time to talk to one another, expressing their actions in words, sharing thoughts with others and allowing themselves to be touched by each other's stories. The new understanding highlights that learning in research groups can be understood as a learning process, where nurses listen to one another and thereby create an expression and meaning of their experiences through caring theory, while at the same time developing their profession. Nurses learn caring theory by being co-researchers in a research group. In order for this to happen, the research collaboration should be characterized by realism and engagement. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renee
    Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: A questionnaire study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1169-1174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One comprehensive part of nursing practice is performing technical skills and handling of medical equipment. This might be challenging for new registered nurses (RNs) to do in patient-safe way. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and compare the extent to which new RNs perform various technical skills and handle medical devices in different settings, and to investigate their possibility for continued learning in this respect. A further aim was to describe their perceptions of incident reporting related to technical skills and medical devices. Design: A cross-sectional study with descriptive and comparative design. Participants: RNs who recently graduated from a nursing programme at three Swedish universities and had worked as a RN for up to 1 year were included in the study (n = 113, response rate 57%). Method: Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire. Results: Half of the RNs reported that they performed several of the listed tasks every day or every week, regardless of workplace. These tasks were most frequently performed in surgical departments. The majority of the participants (76%) stated a need of continued practical training. However, less than half of them (48%) had access to a training environment. Several participants (43%) had been involved in incidents related to technical skills or medical devices, which were not always reported. Nearly a third of the participants (31%) did not use the existing guidelines when performing technical skills, and reflection on performance was uncommon. Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of shared responsibilities between nurse educators and health care employers to provide learning opportunities for new RNs in technical skills, to maintain patient safety. To increase the safety culture where nursing students and new RNs understand the importance of using evidence-based guidelines and taking a reflective approach in the performance of technical tasks is needed.

  • 3.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences.
    Norberg, Astrid
    "Learning by doing" - Or how to reach an understanding of the research method phenomenological hermeneutics2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 735-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One problem addressed in teaching graduate students qualitative research methods is practising the cognitive and conative skills that students need to generate both rich data and meaningful analysis. The aim of the study was to illuminate development in a group of pre-doctoral and doctoral students as they learnt the phenomenological hermeneutics research method. In a course comprising 18 doctoral students we used the "guided path" pedagogical approach and decided to use a subject of which everyone has lived experience, "troubled conscience", for the phenomenological hermeneutic analysis conducted with the students. As the students progressed in their learning experience of the research method, they analysed their data according to the steps in the method, and we as teachers conducted separate analyses of the same data. The results point in the same direction as previous studies in the field. This is discussed in terms of strength of the pedagogical approach and the students' learning, since despite the fact that their data are limited and not very detailed they were able to come up with results that were in line with previous research.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    Högskolan Borås, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Sundler Johansson, Annelie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Högskolan Skövde, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstads universitet, Sweden.
    Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses - A mixed method study.2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1286-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to describe and compare the clinical teacher's role in different models of clinical practice from the perspective of student nurses.

    DESIGN AND SETTINGS: The study took place in collaboration with two Swedish universities that applied different educational models in clinical practice. A mixed method approach was used. The quantitative part had a comparative design and the qualitative part had a descriptive design.

    PARTICIPANTS: The study group consisted of 114 student nurses (response rate 87%). Fifty-three of them had met clinical teachers employed at the university and not participating in the daily clinical work (University Nurse Teachers, UNTs), whilst 61 had met clinical teachers dividing their time between teaching and nursing (Clinical Nurse Teachers, CNTs). Eight students participated in the qualitative part of the study.

    METHODS: A questionnaire including the CLES+T scale was used to ascertain the students' perception of the clinical teacher's role, complemented by interviews directed towards an enrichment of this perception.

    RESULTS: Students meeting CNTs agreed more strongly than those meeting UNTs that the teacher had the ability to help them integrate theory and practice. Whilst spontaneous meetings between students and CNTs occurred, students mostly met UNTs in seminars. Students meeting UNTs felt alone but did appreciate having someone outside the clinical environment to provide support if they did not get along with their preceptor.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the case of UNTs, it is important that they keep their knowledge of clinical issues updated and visit the clinical placement not only for seminars but also to give students emotional support. In the case of CNTs, it is important that they are members of the faculty at the university, take part in the planning of the clinical courses and are able to explain the learning goals to the students.

  • 5.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Höglund, A. T.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, M.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nursing students' awareness of inequity in healthcare — An intersectional perspective2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 48, no 1 jan, p. 134-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The overall aim of the present study was to explore awareness of inequity in healthcare and the intersection between different structures of power among nursing students. Another aim was to delineate the knowledge and use of Swedish Healthcare Direct in this group. Design The study had a descriptive design with a quantitative approach. Participants The sample consisted of 157 nursing students from three universities in central Sweden. Methods The students filled out a study specific questionnaire in class. The questionnaire consisted of short descriptions of twelve fictive persons who differed in gender, age, and ethnicity, with questions about their life situation. The mean was calculated for each assessed fictive person for every item. In the next step, the assessments were ranked from the lowest probability to the highest probability. A ‘Good life-index’ consisting of quality of life, power over own life, and experience of discrimination, was also calculated. Free text comments were analysed qualitatively. Results People with Swedish names were assessed to have the highest probability of having a good life. Among those with Swedish names, the oldest woman was assessed as having the lowest probability of a good life. All students had knowledge about Swedish Healthcare Direct, but more female students had used the service compared to male students. Conclusions The results indicate that the nursing students had awareness of how power and gender, ethnicity and age, are related. Based on the free text comments, the questions and the intersectional perspective seemed to evoke some irritation which points to their sensitive nature. Therefore, the questionnaire could be used as a tool to start a discussion of equity in healthcare and in interventions where the aim is to raise awareness of inequality and intersectionality.

  • 6.
    Holmström, Inger
    et al.
    Uppsala Science Park, Sweden.
    Larsson, Jan
    Uppsala Science Park, Sweden.
    A tension between genuine care and other duties: Swedish nursing students' views of their future work.2005In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 148-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a current need for nurses to take on new roles due to changing health care policies, economic cut-backs and shortage of staff. It is therefore important to study nursing students' view of their future profession. The theoretical framework was contemporary theories of competence development, which has shown that people's understanding of their work is expressed in their actions. The aim of this study was to describe nursing students' understanding of their future professional role in health care. A purposeful sample of 12 nursing students wrote narratives. The texts were condensed in five steps using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological Method. The essence of the students' view of their future work was A tension between genuine nursing care and other duties. Four themes constituted this essence: professional status, working conditions and stress, evidence-based nursing contra holistic care, teamwork, co-operation and disrespect, and intensive care instead of geriatrics. This study highlights pedagogic and practical problems that need to be constructively addressed. The nursing students' eagerness to care in a holistic way needs to be acknowledged and used in a fruitful way. This core function of nursing needs to be integrated with up-to-date nursing research.

  • 7.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    School of Health, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to the organization of supervision: A questionnaire survey2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to investigate student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to how the supervision was organized. Background: The clinical environment plays an essential part in student nurses' learning. Even though different models for supervision have been previously set forth, it has been stressed that there is a need both of further empirical studies on the role of preceptorship in undergraduate nursing education and of studies comparing different models. Method: A cross-sectional study with comparative design was carried out with a mixed method approach. Data were collected from student nurses in the final term of the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden by means of a questionnaire. Results: In general the students had positive experiences of the clinical learning environment with respect to pedagogical atmosphere, leadership style of the ward manager, premises of nursing, supervisory relationship, and role of the nurse preceptor and nurse teacher. However, there were significant differences in their ratings of the supervisory relationship (p < 0.001) and the pedagogical atmosphere (p 0.025) depending on how the supervision was organized. Students who had the same preceptor all the time were more satisfied with the supervisory relationship than were those who had different preceptors each day. Students' comments on the supervision confirmed the significance of the preceptor and the supervisory relationship. Conclusion: The organization of the supervision was of significance with regard to the pedagogical atmosphere and the students' relation to preceptors. Students with the same preceptor throughout were more positive concerning the supervisory relationship and the pedagogical atmosphere.

  • 8.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. School of Education, Health, and Society, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Skoglund, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Summer Meranius, Martina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Sundler, A. J.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    The care of and communication with older people from the perspective of student nurses. A mixed method study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 52, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Undergraduate nurse education needs to prepare student nurses to meet the demands and to have the necessary communication skills for caring for an increasing older population. The challenges involve how best to support and empower student nurses to learn the communication skills needed to care for older people. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate student nurses' views on the care of and communication with older people. Design A descriptive study with a mixed-method approach was conducted. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from a questionnaire completed by third-year Swedish student nurses in 2015. Results The student nurses reported positive attitudes to the care of and communication with older people. The findings focus on the central aspects related to relationship building, techniques for communication and external prerequisites. Conclusions Despite positive attitudes, student nurses had a limited view of communication with older people. Educators need to increase student nurses' capacity to communicate effectively with older people. Educational interventions to improve and evaluate the communication competency of nurses and student nurses are needed.

  • 9.
    Skoglund, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Hammar, L.M
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Previous work experience and age do not affect final semester nursing student self-efficacy in communication skills2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 68, p. 182-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: With the continuing increase in the older population, being able to communicate with the elderly is one of the many important skills in caring for older people. Therefore, student nurses need support during education to be prepared with the necessary communication skills to meet these demands. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the development of communication skills during nursing education. Design: A quantitative descriptive and comparative study. Settings: The nursing programme at a university in an urban area of Sweden. Participants: Student nurses in the first and third year in a nursing programme in Sweden in 2015. Methods: Data were collected with a self-efficacy questionnaire and analysed with descriptive and comparative statistics. Results: The student nurses in the final semester had a higher self-rated ability to communicate with older people than students in the second semester of the education year. There was also a difference in self efficacy between students with or without former experience of health care work or work in care with older persons in the second semester. However, these differences were not seen in the final semester. The age of the students did not affect the self-efficacy rate in either semester. Conclusions: Student nurses in the present study scored themselves relatively highly, while student nurses in previous studies expressed a need for more communication skills training. Further studies with observations of student nurses’ actual communicative skills in clinical and simulations settings are needed, to pinpoint weak spots and targets for such an education. 

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