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  • 1.
    Berglund, Mia
    et al.
    Univ Skövde.
    Sjögren, Reet
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linneuniv.
    Reflect and learn together - when two supervisors interact in the learning support process of nurse education2012In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the importance of supervisors working together in supporting the learning process of nurse students through reflective caring science supervision. Background A supervision model has been developed in order to meet the need for interweaving theory and practice. The model is characterized by learning reflection in caring science. A unique aspect of the present project was that the student groups were led by a teacher and a nurse. Method Data were collected through interviews with the supervisors. The analysis was performed with a phenomenological approach. Results The results showed that theory and practice can be made more tangible and interwoven by using two supervisors in a dual supervision. The essential structure is built on the constituents 'Reflection as Learning Support', 'Interweaving Caring Science with the Patient's Narrative', 'The Student as a Learning Subject' and 'The Learning Environment of Supervision'. Conclusion The study concludes that supervision in pairs provides unique possibilities for interweaving and developing theory and practice. Implications for nursing management The supervision model offers unique opportunities for cooperation, for the development of theory and practice and for the development of the professional roll of nurses and teachers.

  • 2.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Ann-Kristin
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renée
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstads universitet, Sweden.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    Högskolan Borås, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Sundler Johansson, Annelie
    Högskolan Skövde, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to investigate occupational stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to the workplace and clinical group supervision.

    BACKGROUND: Being a newly graduated nurse is particularly stressful. What remains unclear is whether the workplace and clinical group supervision affect the stress.

    METHOD: A cross-sectional comparative study was performed in 2012. Data were collected by means of a numerical scale measuring occupational stress, questions about workplace and clinical group supervision. One hundred and thirteen nurses who had recently graduated from three Swedish universities were included in the study.

    RESULTS: The stress was high among the newly graduated nurses but it differed significantly between workplaces, surgical departments generating the most stress. Nurses who had received clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress. The stress between workplaces remained significant also when participation in clinical group supervision was taken into account.

    CONCLUSIONS: Newly graduated nurses experience great stress and need support, especially those in surgical departments. Nurses participating in clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: It is important to develop strategies that help to adapt the work situation so as to give nurses the necessary support. Clinical group supervision should be considered as an option for reducing stress.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Susanne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Supervisor experiences of supervising nursing staff in the care of older people2008In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 876-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe supervisors' experiences of supervising nursing staff who care for older people in order to develop an understanding of the opportunities and limitations involved in supervision. Background Little is known of what group supervision of nursing staff means for the supervisor, particularly in regards to care of the old. Methods A reflective life-world research approach, based upon phenomenological epistemonology was used. Two supervisors with 2 years experience of supervising nursing staff caring for older people were interviewed. Conclusions Results point to the need for support for supervisors in order to enable them to develop their supervisory abilities and skills. Implications for nursing management Support is of crucial importance for both the ability to supervise and the quality of supervision. 

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Ersta Sköndal University, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Supportive leadership in Swedish community night nursing2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 822-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  The aim of the present study was to examine the support night nurses’ give to staff in community night nursing.

    Background  Studies have shown that support given to staff is one of night registered nurses’ (RNs’) experiences of the meaning of caring. This support, that community RNs display for staff in night-time care, is sparsely described.

    Methods  All community night-duty nurses in a medium-sized municipal in Sweden participated in the present study. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse data from observations.

    Results  The support given by RNs to staff is described using three themes: (1) a conditional supporting stance, (2) preparing propitious conditions for caring and (3) confidence in the abilities of individual staff members and adaptation to their individual needs. The results reveal that RNs consider support to staff in terms of nursing leadership.

    Conclusions  Out of ‘concern for the staff’ the RNs try to be there for them, which corresponds to nursing leadership. Such concern also arises from the RNs’ awareness that by giving support to staff this affects the staffs’ caring for older people.

    Implications for nursing management  The current municipal social care organization of community nursing of older people in which RNs have extensive responsibilities with insufficient control, is a working condition with a risk for decreased quality of care and a high risk for work-related stress syndrome.

    The aim of the present study was to examine the support night nurses give to staff in community night nursing. Studies have shown that support given to staff is one of night registered nurses (RNs) experiences of the meaning of caring. This support, that community RNs display for staff in night-time care, is sparsely described.

    All community night-duty nurses in a medium-sized municipal in Sweden participated in the present study. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse data from observations. The support given by RNs to staff is described using three themes: (1) a conditional supporting stance, (2) preparing propitious conditions for caring and (3) confidence in the abilities of individual staff members and adaptation to their individual needs. The results reveal that RNs consider support to staff in terms of nursing leadership.Conclusions Out of concern for the staff  the RNs try to be there for them, which corresponds to nursing leadership. Such concern also arises from the RNs awareness that by giving support to staff this affects the staffs caring for older people. Implications for nursing management The current municipal social care organization of community nursing of older people in which RNs have extensive responsibilities with insufficient control, is a working condition with a risk for decreased quality of care and a high risk for work-related stress syndrome.

  • 5.
    Johansson-Pajala, Rose-Marie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Jorsäter Blomgren, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Fastbom, Johan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Nurses' use of computerised decision support systems affects drug monitoring in nursing homes2017In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe variations in nurses' perceptions of using a computerised decision support system (CDSS) in drug monitoring. Background: There is an increasing focus on incorporating informatics into registered nurses' (RNs) clinical practice. Insight into RNs’ perceptions of using a CDSS in drug monitoring can provide a basis for further development of safer practices in drug management. Method: A qualitative interview study of 16 RNs. Data were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Results: The RNs perceived a variety of aspects of using a CDSS indrug monitoring. Aspects of ‘time’ were evident, as was giving a ‘standardisation’ to the clinical work. There were perceptions of effects of obtained knowledge and ‘evidence’ and the division of ‘responsibilities’ between RNs and physicians of using the CDSS. Conclusion: The RNs perceived a CDSS as supportive in drug monitoring, in terms of promoting standardised routines, team-collaboration and providing possibilities for evidence-based clinical practice. Implications: Implementing a CDSS seems to be one feasible strategy to improve RNs’ preconditions for safe drug management. Nurse managers’ engagement and support in this process are vital for a successful result.

  • 6.
    Josefsson, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Hansson, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    To lead and to be led in municipal elderly care in Sweden as perceived by registered nurses2011In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 498-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe registered nurses' (RNs) perceptions of their own leadership and of their immediate line management, as well as leadership's organizational prerequisites in municipal elderly care. Background Nursing leadership is a main factor influencing care quality. In spite of this, there is a leadership crisis in municipal elderly care. Method A descriptive design utilizing a questionnaire. The setting was 60 residential care homes in Sweden with 213 participating nurses. The response rate was 62%. Results Most nurses (59%) viewed themselves as leaders of a smaller group, whereas 28% did not consider themselves as leaders at all. Few nurses had the will to develop their leadership competence. In all, 25% of the nurses had unresolved serious conflicts with their immediate line management. Half perceived receiving no or little feedback from their immediate line management. A majority had no organized supervision. They perceived, on average, organizational prerequisites as unclear, with few possibilities for leadership competence development. Conclusions Nurses need to be more willing to develop their leadership skills. Nurses need managers to support them in their leadership roles. They need distinct and supportive organizational prerequisites for leadership. Implications for nursing management It is crucial to provide distinct and supportive organizational prerequisites for nursing leadership.

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