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  • 1.
    Harstäde, C. W.
    et al.
    Linnæus University.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Linnæus University; Haraldsplass University College, Bergen, Norway .
    Brunt, D.
    Linnæus University.
    Andershed, B.
    Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Norway; Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Next of Kin's experiences of shame in end-of-life care2014In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of shame of next of kin in end-of-life care. Seventeen next of kin who had lost a family member were interviewed. A method inspired by Gadamer's hermeneutic approach was used to interpret possible experiences of shame and to discuss these interpretations. The result showed that next of kin's experiences of shame are linked to their perception of the remaining time and are guided by views on morality and what is right and wrong. Shame can occur when the next of kin are involved and actually cause harm to the family member as well as in situations that are beyond their control. Shame can also involve actions that have nothing to do with what they have actually done but is instead a shame that is placed on them by others, for example, health professionals or relatives. Shame is interpreted as experiences of ignominy, humiliation, and disgrace. Second-order shame is also found. It is important that health professionals are aware of these experiences of unhealthy shame when they meet and support next of kin in end-of-life care.

  • 2.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    et al.
    Gotland University College, Sweden; Lineus Univ, Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Gjøvik University College, Norway.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnéuniversitetet,Sweden; Gjovik Univ Coll, Dept Nursing, Gjovik, Norway.
    Brunt, David
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Feelings of guilt - Experiences of next-of-kin in end-of-life care2013In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of guilt of the next-of-kin in end-of-life care. Seventeen next-of-kin who had lost a loved one were interviewed with a focus on possible experiences of guilt. A Gadamerian-based hermeneutic approach to interpret these experiences was used. The interpretation showed that next-of-kin’s experiences of guilt emanated from a situation where the next-of-kin had a moral view on what was the right thing to do, it could also originate from a wish to do the best possible for the dying person out of love for this person. The situation could also involve both these aspects.  The way in which the situation was handled, could, if the next-of-kin felt that s/he did not fulfill her/his commitments, omitted or neglected the dying person or was the cause of something, lead to experiences of guilt. The situation of being next-of-kin in end-of-life care is complex and demanding, something that health professionals are and should be aware of. Acknowledgement of experiences of guilt can help the next-of-kin in their adaptation to the end-of-life situation as a whole and maybe also give useful tools to support next-of-kin through bereavement.

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