mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Blomberg, Helena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stier, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Metaphorical expression used in Swedish news media narratives to portray the shortage of nurses and their working conditions2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 382-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study is to uncover and reveal how nurses as a profession and their working conditions are dramatized and portrayed inSwedish media narratives about the shortage of nurses. Background: The media is an arena where stakeholders can air their views of the healthcare sector in general and the situation for nurses in particular. The focus in this study is the debate in Sweden on the shortage of nurses. Design: Qualitative discursive study. Method: A discourse analysis of media narratives about nurses and their working conditions published in several Swedish newspapers from 2009-2014. 1779 articles were included in the study. A selection (113 articles) of these articles was further analysed using a qualitative discursive psychological approach. Findings: Nurses are portrayed as being good, concerned about and critical of healthcare managers and politicians for not taking action. The accused actors justify their actions by partially accepting or displacing responsibility. The shortage of nurses is framed as a social problem - a threat to patients' safety. Seven different types of metaphorical expression frame the problem as inevitable, beyond control, abstract, an individual and collegial problem and nurses as replaceable. In addition, nurses and patients are dehumanized and no-one is held responsible. Conclusions: This study analyses the role of the media in emphasizing the seriousness or obscurity of the problem and possible solutions to it. Alternative narratives are needed to re-frame the nursing shortage and to find sustainable solutions. 

  • 2.
    Darbyshire, Philip
    et al.
    Monash University Victoria Australia.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    External scrutiny, faculty research culture and the changing university2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2571-2575Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Holmström, Inger
    Folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap Uppsala Universitet.
    Engström, Maria
    Högskolan i Gävle, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Telenurses’ experiences of working with computerized decisionsupport: supporting, inhibiting and quality improving2009In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 65, no 5, p. 1074-1083Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Mona
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Experiencing a nurse identity: the meaning of identity to Swedish registered nurses 2 years after graduation2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale. The professional identity and experiences of nurses have been focused upon in different studies Aim. This is a longitudinal study whose aim was to understand how nurses experience the meaning of their identity as nurses, when they are students and nurses 2 years after graduation. Design. Data were collected through interviews once a year during education and two years after graduation, and were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method, inspired by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. Findings. The analyses of the narratives resulted in four perspectives: 'Having the patient in focus', 'Being a team leader', 'Preceptorship' and 'Task orientation'. The nurses did not change perspectives but the perspective showed a transition over time. Conclusion. The nurses' not changing perspective over time is understood as being a life paradigm, remaining throughout the years.

  • 5.
    Frank, Catharina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Baigi, Amir
    Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Questionnarie for patient participation in emergency departments: development and psychometric testing2011In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 643-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of the study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a patient participation questionnaire in emergency departments.

     

    Background Patient participation is an important indicator of quality of healthcare. International and national health care policy guidelines promote patient participation. While patients cared for in emergency departments generally express dissatisfaction with their care, a review of the literature fails to reveal any scientifically tested research instruments for assessing patient participation from the perspective of patients.

     

    Methods A methodological study was conducted involving a convenience sample of 356 patients recently cared for in emergency departments in Sweden. Data was collected in 2008 and the analyses performed were tested for construct and criterion validity and also homogeneity and stability reliability.

     

    Results A 17- item questionnaire was developed. Two separate factor analyses revealed a distinct four- factor solution which was labelled: fight for participation, requirement for participation, mutual participation and participating in getting basic needs satisfied. Criterion validity presented showed 9 out of 20 correlations above 0.30 and of those 3 moderate correlations of 0.62, 0.63 and 0.70. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient ranged from 0.63 - 0.84 and test- retest varied between 0.59 and 0.93.

     

    Conclusion The results signify evidence of acceptable validity and reliability and the questionnaire makes it possible to evaluate patient participation in ED caring situations. In addition it produces data which is useable by a diverse range of healthcare professionals.

     

  • 6.
    Frank, Catharina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Baigi, Amir
    General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Patient participation in the emergency department: an evaluation using a specific instrument to measure patient participation (PPED2011In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 728-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  This study aimed at evaluating patient participation from the perspective of patients who received care in emergency departments, with a separate examination of the relationship between participation and age, sex, education and priority level.

    Background: International and national guidelines encourage patient participation. High patient participation is required to ensure a high quality of care. No studies evaluating patient participation at an emergency department have been published.

    Methods: An evaluating study, with the Patient Participation Emergency Department questionnaire, was conducted at emergency departments in Sweden. A consecutive sample of 356 patients participated. Data was collected in 2008: participants were 49% women and with an average age of 56 years. The statistical methods used were Student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA and Spearman correlation.

    Results: The results revealed that patients experienced good requirement such as time and information for participation. Mutual participation demonstrated a reasonable level but patient participation is low in two dimensions (Fight for participation, Participation in getting basic needs satisfied). Young and well‑educated patients fought more to participate in their care and gained less attention for basic needs than older and less well‑educated patients.

    Conclusions: Patient participation in a mutual care situation between patients and healthcare professionals requires further improvement to ensure that patients are satisfied and do not have to struggle and fight in order to participate in their care.

  • 7.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Krantz, Anna
    Ängens Vårdcent, Örebro, Sweden..
    Karacagil, Lena
    Västeras Sjukhus, Västerås, Sweden..
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden..
    Frequent callers in primary health care - a qualitative study with a nursing perspective2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 622-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To: (a) describe how telephone nurses define a frequent caller; and (b) describe their experiences with calls from frequent callers to primary healthcare centres. Background. Telephone nursing has been noted to be a cost-effective method to enhance access to and use of health care. Some patients use these services extensively and are called 'frequent callers'. Little is known about this group of callers, the reasons behind these calls and telephone nurses' experiences and strategies to manage the calls. Design. Descriptive design with a qualitative inductive approach. Methods. Interviews were conducted with ten telephone nurses in Sweden in 2015. Qualitative content analysis was conducted. Results. A main theme was established, called 'Balancing between the experienced and assessed needs', which described the telephone nurses' experiences with calls made by frequent callers to primary healthcare centres and was further described in five categories with 15 subcategories. The categories described telephone nurses' definitions of frequent callers, telephone nurses' views of the underlying reasons for the calls, challenges related to frequent callers, experiences with an increased work load and strategies used to manage and help frequent callers. Conclusion. Frequent callers were commonly encountered by telephone nurses' in this study. Their calls were experienced as complex and demanding to manage. The findings point to needs for guidelines and routines to improve the care of frequent callers. In addition, support and training in communication skills to encounter this group of callers in an optimal and safe way may be required.

  • 8.
    Holmström, Inger
    et al.
    Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Rosenqvist, Urban
    Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Misunderstandings about illness and treatment among patients with type 2 diabetes2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 146-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. This paper reports a study whose aim was to describe the misunderstandings that Swedish patients with type 2 diabetes have about their illness and treatment. Background. It is well known that patients with type 2 diabetes need extensive support and education to learn to manage and live with their illness. However, a Swedish survey has shown that only 34% of these patients had good metabolic control. Despite intensive education and support, misunderstandings about both the illness and treatment seem to be common. Furthermore, patients are currently complaining that health care services sometimes obstruct rather than support self-care and learning. Methods. We videotaped 18 authentic encounters between a patient with diabetes and a physician, or a diabetes nurse. Patients then viewed the video and reflected on what took place during the consultation. Video-recordings and transcribed reflections were analysed thematically. Results. Five themes emerged from the analysis: (a) Type 2 diabetes is not 'real diabetes'; (b) Complications - horror visions or suppression; (c) Self-monitoring of blood glucose and medication is a routine, not a learning tool; (d) Diet - the important thing is to reduce fat and (e) 'Physical exercise is good, they tell us'. Four of the 18 patients showed no misunderstandings. Misunderstandings of diabetes and its treatment were thus common and numerous, despite regular checkups and good access to care. The patients adhered to prescribed regimens but did not know why they performed many routines or how they could benefit from them. Conclusion. The results show that misunderstandings of illness and treatment were common. We suggest that diabetes educators should base their education on this variation of understanding, using a phenomenological approach to learning. Reflecting on this kind of varied experiences can be a powerful tool to help people to move from 'novice to expert' and apply basic routines to new situations.

  • 9.
    Höglander, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Håkansson Eklund, Jakob
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eide, Hilde
    Univ Coll Southeast Norway, Drammen, Norway..
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    Univ Borås, Borås, Sweden..
    Registered Nurses' and nurse assistants' responses to older persons' expressions of emotional needs in home care2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 12, p. 2923-2932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study aims to explore nurse assistants' and Registered Nurses' responses to older persons' expressions of emotional needs during home care visits. Background: Communication is a central aspect of care. Older persons might express different emotions and needs during home care visits and such expressions can be challenging to respond to. Little is known about communication in home care or nursing staff responses to older persons' expressed emotional needs. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional design on nursing staff responses to older persons' negative emotions in home care. Methods: Collected data consisted of audio recordings of home care visits between older persons and nursing staff. Data were collected between August 2014-November 2015. The nursing staff responses to older persons' negative emotions in the communication were analysed with the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES). Results: The nursing staff most often give non-explicit responses, providing space for further disclosure of older persons' expressed negative emotions. Such responses were more frequent if the nursing staff had elicited the older persons' expressions of a negative emotion than if such expressions were elicited by the older persons themselves. Most frequent types of responses were backchannel, active invitation or information advice. Conclusion: The nursing staff responses were mainly non-explicit responses providing space for older persons to tell more about their experiences. Such responses can be discussed in terms of person-centred communication and is important for the comfort of emotional concerns.

  • 10.
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning.
    Rosenqvist, Urban
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning.
    Telenurses' understanding of work: detective or educator?2009In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 382-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM This paper is a report of a study to describe the different ways of understanding work among a group of Swedish telenurses.

    BACKGROUND Telenursing is an expanding service in many western countries and telenursing work is likely to be understood in a variety of ways. The way in which a person understands work influences how work is performed. Telenursing demands high levels of competence.

    METHOD A qualitative interview study was conducted during 2004-2005. Twelve of the 20 telenurses working at a call centre in Sweden were interviewed, five of them twice because of organizational changes. The 17 interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach.

    FINDINGS Five different categories were identified in the data: (1) Assess, refer and give advice to the caller (2) Support the caller (3) Strengthen the caller (4) Teach the caller and (5) Facilitate the caller's learning. The first category can be seen as a base for telenursing work and was the only category used by some telenurses. The second category has components of traditional caring and the third is a coaching function. The fourth category contains a teaching component, but the fifth is the only category where the caller's learning is in focus. Telenurses who reported the fifth way also included all other ways of understanding work. Hence, this seems to be the most comprehensive way of understanding work.

    CONCLUSION The categories together constitute a telenursing 'workmap'. This 'workmap' can be used for reflection to expand telenurses' current understanding of work, and hence promote competence development. Telenurses need to be aware of their role in public health education.

  • 11.
    Lugina, Helen I
    et al.
    School of Nursing, Muhimbili Univ. Coll. of Hlth. Sci., Dar es Salaam, Tanzania .
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Assessing mothers' concerns in the postpartum period: methodological issues.2004In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 279-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study evaluating the sensitivity of a semi-structured interview schedule and card sort methods in assessing postpartum concerns of women. BACKGROUND: Several methods have been used to assess postpartum maternal concerns and the process of becoming a mother, but few studies have evaluated the methods with respect to their sensitivity for obtaining information. METHOD: A cohort of mothers was followed-up at one (n = 110) and 6 weeks (n = 83) after childbirth in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Women with a minimum of 7 years of primary education were interviewed and they also sorted cards. Those with less fewer than 7 years of primary education were interviewed only. The methods were used in alternate order to assess method interaction. RESULTS: In the interviews at 1 week, mothers more often expressed worry and interest related to the baby or themselves when they had sorted cards first. The extent to which women expressed worry and interest about specific baby- and mother-related topics was generally higher for women who had sorted cards before the interview at both 1 and 6 weeks. Independent of whether they were interviewed only, interviewed after sorting cards or before, mothers more often expressed a higher degree of interest than of worry about the baby and self at both 1 and 6 weeks. The order of the data collection methods did not influence the way women sorted cards as being worries and interests. CONCLUSION: Compared to interview using a semi-structured interview schedule, our findings suggest that the card sort is more sensitive in obtaining information about women's concerns. Although the interview method has the advantage of reaching less educated people, the card sort is a technique that is associated with fewer barriers and is a more participatory method for those who can use it.

  • 12.
    Lööf, Helena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Welin Henriksson, Elisabet
    Lindblad, Staffan
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Development and psychometric testing of the Swedish version of the Body Awareness Questionnaire2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 1643-1651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    This paper is a report of the development and psychometric testing of the Swedish version of the Body Awareness Questionnaire to measure bodily focus of attention.

    Background

    The Body Awareness Questionnaire has been identified as an instrument with excellent psychometric properties within the concept of body awareness. It has been used in both research and clinical settings in different contexts. However, a validated Swedish version is not available.

    Method

    A cross-sectional design was applied for adaptation of the Body Awareness Questionnaire and psychometric validation. Data were collected between autumn 2009 and spring 2011 from 120 patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, and from 120 students. The ‘concurrent think aloud’ method was used in a pre-test to determine the usability of the questionnaire. Cronbach's alpha was used to test the internal consistency, and confirmatory factor analysis was performed to test the construct validity.

    Results

    According to the confirmatory factor analysis, neither the one-factor model nor the four-factor model tested in this study fulfilled the pre-specified criteria in accordance with the Comparative Fit Index, Standardized Root Mean Squared Residual and the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation. The value of Cronbach's alpha for the Swedish version of the Body Awareness Questionnaire was satisfactory.

    Conclusion

    Our results indicate that the two models tested in this study do not provide a good fit to the observed data. Further refinement and testing of the Swedish version of the Body Awareness Questionnaire is therefore required. The concept of body awareness may

  • 13.
    Saarnio, Lotta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst.
    Arman, Maria
    Karolinska Inst.
    Ekstrand, Per
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Power relations in patient's experiences of suffering during treatment for cancer2012In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 271-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper is a report of how patients who have cancer experience suffering in the context of power relations. Background. Many studies in Sweden and in other countries have detected inequality in healthcare use and resources, including unseen influences that can be connected to gender and distribution of resources. Few studies have examined how multiple relations of power such as gender, ethnicity, age and education influence how people with cancer experience suffering during treatment. Method. A hermeneutic design was used. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 women and 14 men receiving treatment for a variety of cancer diagnoses. The data collection was done at two hospitals in Sweden during 20082009. The interpretation of data was based on two theoretical perspectives suffering and intersectionality. Results. The results highlight patients suffering where two or more positions of power relations interacted with each other. Three main themes were identified: the complexity of control, the vulnerable effects of body changes, and the internal battle of survival. Conclusion. A vulnerable social situation for people with cancer concretely increased their suffering. Social inequalities, seemingly linked to social hierarchy, increased the suffering of people with cancer. For example, women with cancer with a low education belonging to an ethnic minority suffered more than highly educated patients belonging to the ethnic majority.

  • 14.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    et al.
    Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden..
    Eide, Hilde
    Univ Coll Southeast Norway, Fac Hlth Sci, Drammen, Norway..
    van Dulmen, Sandra
    Univ Coll Southeast Norway, Fac Hlth Sci, Drammen, Norway.;NIVEL Netherlands Inst Hlth Serv Res, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Primary & Community Care, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Communicative challenges in the home care of older persons - a qualitative exploration2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 10, p. 2435-2444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To explore communicative challenges in encounters between nurse assistants and older persons during home care visits. Background. The older population is increasing worldwide. Currently, there is a shift in care for older people from institutional care to home care. Providing home care in a person's home involves several challenges, including the complexity of communication. Design. A descriptive observational design with a qualitative approach was used. Methods. The data consisted of audio recordings of real-life encounters during home care visits between nurse assistants and older persons, collected in 2014. A hermeneutic phenomenological analysis was conducted. Results. Communicative challenges were identified: (a) in situations where the older persons had a different view than the nurse assistants on the care task and its content; and (b) when unexpected actions or turns occurred in the communication. Challenges included older person's existential issues, fragility and worries and concerns, which often appeared to be only vaguely expressed and difficult to verbally detect and tackle. This engendered a risk of misinterpretation or ignorance of these challenges. Conclusion. The findings point to the importance of communication as the key to facilitate person-centred home care. Communication training should focus more on addressing needs and existential issues in older persons. Person-centred home care for older persons needs to be addressed at both an individual and an organizational level.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf