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  • 1.
    Hörberg, U.
    et al.
    Linnæus University, School of Health and Caring Sciences, Lifeworld Centre for Health, Care and Learning, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Reet
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Dahlberg, K.
    Linnæus University, School of Health and Caring Sciences, Lifeworld Centre for Health, Care and Learning, Sweden.
    To be strategically struggling against resignation: The lived experience of being cared for in forensic psychiatric care2012Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, nr 11, s. 743-751Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To be referred to care in forensic psychiatric services can be seen as one of the most comprehensive encroachments society can impose upon a person's life, as it entails a limitation of the individual's freedom with no time limit. This study focuses upon patients' experiences of their life situation in forensic psychiatric wards. Using a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach founded in phenomenology, we analysed 11 qualitative interviews with patients cared for on a maximum security unit in a Swedish forensic psychiatric service. Results show how forensic psychiatric care can be non-caring with only moments of good care, from the patient's perspective. By using different strategies, the patients attempt to adapt to the demands of the caregivers in order to gain privileges. At the same time the patients are lacking meaningful and close relationships and long to get away from the system of forensic care. Being cared for entails struggling against an approaching overwhelming sense of resignation.

  • 2.
    Kumpula, Esa
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Ekstrand, Per
    Red Cross Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Challenges and Possibilities for Understanding Men's Health in Twenty-First Century Forensic Psychiatric Care2014Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 35, nr 8, s. 613-619Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Forensic psychiatric care in Sweden constitutes a specific institutional environment in health care in terms of gender and power relationships. This context emphasizes safety and protection in an environment where men constitute a majority of the patients and staff. It involves relationships among men's health, constructions of masculinities, and issues regarding equality between women's and men's caring work. The aim of this theoretical article is to problematize men's health in relation to constructions of masculinities. Our analysis shows how the perception of health is involved in the construction of masculinities and how this plays out in daily interactions between caregivers and patients.

  • 3.
    Lassenius, O.
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Arman, M.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Wiklund-Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd. Narvik University College, Norway.
    Motivation does not come with an ending-it's the beginning of something new: Experiences of motivating persons with psychiatric disabilities to physical activity2014Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 35, nr 9, s. 713-720Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite strong evidence for the positive relationship between physical activity and mental health, physical activity is used far too little to promote health in mental health care. Fourteen caregivers working in community mental health services were interviewed about their experiences of motivating adult persons with psychiatric disabilities to be physically active, and data were analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutical approach. Three themes emerged: (1) An approach of conscious acts, (2) Companionship as a joint creation, and (3) Understanding as a way to create meaning. The interpreted meaning of motivating to physical activity was expressed as a dynamic way of being, relating, and understanding.

  • 4.
    Lassenius, Oona
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Arman, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd. Narvik University College.
    Moving toward Reclaiming Life: Lived Experiences of Being Physically Active Among Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities2013Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, nr 10, s. 739-746Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is abundant documentation in research about the significant relationship between physical activity and mental health, but there is still more to be learned about what can enhance motivation to become more physically active. Fourteen persons with psychiatric disabilities were interviewed about their experiences of being physically active, and data was analyzed using a phenomenologicalhermeneutic method. Five themes emerged: Capability for Living, Liberation from a Heavy Mind, Companionship in Being in Motion, Longing for Living One’s Life, and Struggling with Limitations. The interpreted meaning of being physically active was to be moving toward reclaiming one’s life.

  • 5.
    Saltzmann-Eriksson, M.
    et al.
    Central Hospital, Västerås.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för vård- och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Encountering Touch: a path to affinity in psychiatric care2005Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 26, nr 8, s. 843-852Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of physical contact and touching in psychiatric care has, in many instances, been considered inappropriate. Psychiatry is often perceived as a verbal process and it has been generally believed that touching can provoke both aggressiveness and destructive manifestations of sexuality. However, recent research has suggested that touching can play an important role in psychiatric treatment once a caring relationship has been established. The aim of this study is to investigate the meaning of physical contact for patients who have been treated for psychosis. Through four in-depth interviews and a life-world analysis the results show that touching means to be in need, to yearn, and to belong. Furthermore, touching also communicates feelings between bodies and, as such, it can be a path through which one feels acknowledged as a human being. The results indicate that a feeling of affinity can originate through physical contact, which can be regarded as a driving force in the search to feel a sense of belonging to the community.

  • 6.
    Salzmann-Erikson, M.
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Panoptic power and mental health nursing-space and surveillance in relation to staff, patients, and neutral places2012Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, nr 8, s. 500-504Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health nurses use manifest and latent approaches for surveillance and observation of patients in the context of mental health care. Patient spaces in mental health organizations are subtly linked to these different means of surveillance. This article investigates these approaches, focusing in particular on the variety of spaces patients occupy and differences in the intensity of observation that can be carried out in them. The aim is to elaborate on space and surveillance in relation to the patients' and nurses' environment in psychiatric nursing care. Places where patients were observed were operationalized and categorized, yielding three spaces: those for patients, those for staff, and neutral areas. We demonstrate that different spaces produce different practices in relation to the exercise of panoptic power and that there is room for maneuvering and engaging in alternatives to "keeping an eye on patients" for nurses in mental health nursing. Some spaces offer asylum from panoptic observations and the viewing eyes of psychiatric nurses, but the majority of spaces in mental health nursing serve as a field of visibility within which the patient is constantly watched.

  • 7.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Söderqvist, Cecilia
    Västmanland Cty Hosp, Cte Clin Res, Västerås, Sweden.
    Being Subject to Restrictions, Limitations and Disciplining: A Thematic Analysis of Individuals' Experiences in Psychiatric Intensive Care2017Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, nr 7, s. 540-548Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe individuals' experiences of being hospitalized in psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs). Four participants who had previously been admitted in a PICU were interviewed using open-ended questions. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Analysis resulted in a synthesis of the various ways patients experienced limitations: (1) Descriptions of Being Limited in the Environment, (2) Descriptions of being Limited in Interactions with Staff, (3) Descriptions of Being Limited in terms of Access to Information, and (4) Descriptions of Having Limited Freedom and Autonomy. Hospitalization is experienced as a life-changing event that shows a kaleidoscopic view of limitation. We stress that the conceptualization of limitation must be considered due to its historical origins, sociopolitical aspirations, and philosophy of care. Thus, nurse practitioners and nursing leaders are advised to put the patient's experience at the center of care, and to involve and integrate patients throughout the recovery process.

  • 8. Salzmann-Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Lutzen, Kim
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability: Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units2011Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 32, nr 4, s. 255-265Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest

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