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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Salzmann-Ericsson, Martin
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Lutzen, Kim
    The core characteristics and nursing care activities in psychiatric intensive care units in Sweden.2008In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 98-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internationally, research on psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs) commonly reports results from demographic studies such as criteria for admission, need for involuntary treatment, and the occurrence of violent behaviour. A few international studies describe the caring aspect of the PICUs based specifically on caregivers' experiences. The concept of PICU in Sweden is not clearly defined. The aim of this study is to describe the core characteristics of a PICU in Sweden and to describe the care activities provided for patients admitted to the PICUs. Critical incident technique was used as the research method. Eighteen caregivers at a PICU participated in the study by completing a semistructured questionnaire. In-depth interviews with three nurses and two assistant nurses also constitute the data. An analysis of the content identified four categories that characterize the core of PICU: the dramatic admission, protests and refusal of treatment, escalating behaviours, and temporarily coercive measure. Care activities for PICUs were also analysed and identified as controlling - establishing boundaries, protecting - warding off, supporting - giving intensive assistance, and structuring the environment. Finally, the discussion put focus on determining the intensive aspect of psychiatric care which has not been done in a Swedish perspective before. PICUs were interpreted as a level of care as it is composed by limited structures and closeness in care.

  • 2.
    Priebe, Åsa
    et al.
    County Council of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fredriksson, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A sanctuary of safety: A study of how patients with dual diagnosis experience caring conversations2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 856-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of dual diagnosis, that is, the combination of psychiatric illnesses and substance use disorders, is high. As a vast majority of previous research in this context focusses on the effects of different treatment methods, rather than interpersonal issues, the purpose of the present study was to explore and illuminate in what way patients with a dual diagnosis experience conversations with nurses in an outpatient clinic to be caring. Five patients were interviewed regarding their experiences of caring conversations. The analysis and interpretation were inspired by a previously-used hermeneutical process. These yielded three themes: (i) reciprocity creates safety and communion; (ii) suffering is made visible and understandable; and (iii) self-esteem is restored. When synthesized, these themes gave rise to a main theme - a sanctuary of safety - where suffering is alleviated and dignity and self-esteem are restored. It is concluded that the caring conversation contributes to experiences of safeness. In this specific context, safety appears to be more fundamental than trust for patients' recoveries. The caring conversation also contributes to recovery, as it supports the individual's learning and understanding as a way to cope with problems, which also enables patients to make informed decisions about their own care. The caring conversation contributes to the alleviation of suffering and restoration of dignity and self-esteem for patients with a dual diagnosis. However, there is a need for further research focussing on how the caring conversation can contribute to psychiatric nurses' caring expertise

  • 3.
    Sellin, Linda
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wallsten, Tuula
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. UiT-Norges Arktiske Universitet, Norway.
    Reconnecting with oneself while struggling between life and death: The phenomenon of recovery as experienced by persons at risk of suicide2017In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 200-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The body of knowledge regarding health and recovery as experienced by patients at risk of suicide is limited. More research is needed into the meaning of recovery and what strengthens the desire to live. The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of recovery in a context of nursing care as experienced by persons at risk of suicide. In line with a reflective lifeworld research approach, 14 patients from a psychiatric clinic in Sweden participated in phenomenon-oriented interviews. Data were analyzed to describe the essence of the phenomenon. The results reveal that the phenomenon of recovery means ‘reconnecting with oneself while struggling between life and death’. Three meaning constituents emerged: being in an expressive space and giving voice to oneself, regaining dignity through nurturing connectedness, and finding a balance in the tension between life and death. In conclusion, the meaning of recovery is to experience the ability to manage one's own life. Professional caregivers need to acknowledge patients' lifeworlds, in a way that enable patients to experience themselves as capable of managing their own lives. Professional caregivers should also facilitate the involvement of supportive relatives.

  • 4.
    Sellin, Linda
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kumlin, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wallsten, Tuula
    Uppsala Univ, Cty Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. UiT Archt Univ Norway, Narvik, Norway.
    Caring for the suicidal person: A Delphi study of what characterizes a recovery-oriented caring approach2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1756-1766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More research is needed for supporting mental health nurses in their caring for suicidal individuals. This study aimed to describe what characterizes a recovery‐oriented caring approach, and how this can be expressed through caring acts involving suicidal patients and their relatives. Delphi methodology was used, and research participants were recruited as experts by experience to explore a recovery‐oriented caring approach in a dialogical process between the experts and the researchers. The results highlight that it is important to acknowledge the view of the uniqueness of each person and reflected understanding of each individual person and experience. The results also reveal that a recovery‐oriented caring approach is characterized by a ‘communicative togetherness’. This communicative togetherness is associated with enabling a nurturing and caring space for suicidal patients to really express themselves and to reach for their own resources. The recovery‐oriented caring approach has thereby potential to facilitate a mutual understanding of the complexities of the patient's situation, and supports patients in influencing their care and regaining authority over their own lives. Accordingly, mental health nurses need to listen sensitively to what suicidal patients really say by acknowledging their lifeworlds and being open to individual variations of their recovery processes. This includes recognizing available and supportive relatives as capable of contributing to the patient's life project to continue living.

  • 5.
    Vincze, M.
    et al.
    Karsudden Hospital, Katrineholm, Sweden .
    Fredriksson, L.
    Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Sweden .
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    To do good might hurt bad: Exploring nurses' understanding and approach to suffering in forensic psychiatric settings2015In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 149-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients in forensic psychiatric settings not only have to deal with their mental illness, but also memories of criminal activities and being involuntarily hospitalized. The aim of the present study was to explore how nurses working in forensic psychiatric services understand and approach patients' experiences of suffering. Data were generated by semistructured interviews with psychiatric nurses from two different forensic psychiatric units in Sweden. Data were analysed by means of a hermeneutic approach inspired by Ricoeur's hermeneutics. The findings are reflected in four main themes: (i) ignoring suffering; (ii) explaining suffering as a natural and inevitable part of daily life in the forensic context; (iii) ascribing meaning to suffering; and, (iv) being present in suffering. To engage in alleviating suffering is a struggle that demands courage and the strength to reflect on its character and consequences. To encounter suffering means that nurses are not only confronted with patients' suffering, but also their own reactions to those patients. If suffering is not recognized or encountered, there is a risk that actions may have a negative impact on patients.

1 - 5 of 5
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