mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Rangsit University, Pathum Thani, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Red Cross University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. The Red Cross University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thai Nurses' experiences of post-operative pain assessment and its' influence on pain management decisions2016In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While many studies have addressed various issues with regards to pain management, there is limited knowledge about how nurses assess pain in surgical wards. This study aimed to describe Thai nurses' experiences of pain assessment in a surgical ward.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional explorative study was conducted. Participants were selected through theoretical sampling. Data was collected through interviews with twelve registered nurses working in surgical wards. Qualitative content analysis guided the analysis of the data.

    RESULTS: Nurses use a double/triple check system, communicated to the healthcare team via records and protocols, and they used their skills and experiences in pain assessment. The results showed that nurses missed the opportunity to include the patients' self-reported pain in their accounts. Though much evidence of pain was collected, this did not seem to benefit the patients. Furthermore, the nurses were not using instruments to measure pain, which illustrates the potential unreliability of professionals who have differing opinions concerning the patients' pain.

    CONCLUSIONS: Thai nurses worked based on a 'patient-evidence' paradigm when assessing patients in pain; this should be shifted to an evidence-based paradigm. Furthermore, by including the patients' self-reported pain in their assessment, nurses would both improve the quality of the pain assessment and empower patients in their pain management. Pain management practices in Thailand should be improved through education, training, supportive innovation, and collegial competence development in order to improve the quality of care in the post-operative field.

  • 2.
    Nilsson, A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Denison, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, P.
    Uppsala University.
    Life values as predictors of pain, disability and sick leave among Swedish registered nurses: A longitudinal study2011In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, BMC Nursing, Vol. 10, no art nr 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prospective studies on high-risk populations, such as subgroups of health care staff, are limited, especially prospective studies among staff not on sick-leave. This paper is a report of a longitudinal study conducted to describe and compare the importance and consistency of life domains among registered nurses (RNs) working in a Swedish hospital and evaluate a model based on the consistency of valued life domains for prediction of pain, disability and sick leave.Method: Importance and consistency ratings of life values, in 9 domains, were collected during 2003 and 2006 from 196 RNs using the Valued Living Questionnaire (VLQ). Logistic regression analyses were used for prediction of pain, disability and sick leave at the three-year follow-up. The predictors family relations, marriage couples/intimate relations, parenting, friends/social life, work, education, leisure time, psychological well-being, and physical self-care were used at baseline.Results: RNs rated life values regarding parenting as most important and with the highest consistency both at baseline and at follow-up. No significant differences were found between RNs' ratings of importance and consistency over the three-year period, except for friends/social relations that revealed a significant decrease in importance at follow-up. The explanatory models for pain, disability and sick leave significantly predicted pain and disability at follow-up. The odds of having pain were significantly increased by one consistency rating (psychological well-being), while the odds were significantly decreased by physical self-care. In the model predicting disability, consistency in psychological well-being and education significantly increased the odds of being disabled, while consistency in physical self-care significantly decreased the odds.Conclusion: The results suggest that there might be a link between intra-individual factors reflecting different aspects of appraised life values and musculoskeletal pain (MSP).

  • 3.
    Wireklint-Sundström, Birgitta
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Högskolan i Borås, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Göteborgs Universitet, Sweden.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Högskolan i Borås, Sweden.
    Possible effects of a course in cardiovascular nursing on prehospital care of patients experiencing suspected acute coronary syndrome: a cluster randomised controlled trial2016In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Current research suggests that nurses can influence the outcome for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study has been to evaluate whether a course in cardiovascular nursing (CVN) can improve ambulance nurses' (ANs') prehospital care of patients experiencing suspected ACS, related to pain intensity.

    METHODS: 

    This is a cluster randomised controlled trial that was conducted in the ambulance services. Patients were allocated to one of two groups: in the first group, patients were treated by ANs who had attended the CVN course and in the second group patients were treated by ANs without this qualification. Inclusion criteria were: 1/pain raising suspicion of ACS, and 2/pain score ≥4 on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The primary outcome was the estimated intensity of pain or discomfort according to VAS 15 min after randomisation. Secondary outcomes were estimated intensity of pain or discomfort on admission to hospital and further requirement of pain treatment, as well as symptoms such as paleness and/or cold sweat; nausea and/or vomiting; anxiety, dyspnea, degree of alertness, respiratory depression and aggressiveness. A further secondary outcome measured was survival to 30 days. Lastly, a final diagnosis was made. A total of 38 ANs attended the CVN course. There were 1,747 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria.

    RESULTS: 

    The pain score did not differ significantly between the two groups fifteen minutes after randomisation (median value of VAS was 4.0 in both groups). On admission to hospital the pain score was significantly lower for patients treated by an AN who had attended the CVN course (n = 332) compared with those treated by an AN who had not attended the course (n = 1,415) (median 2.5 and 3.0 respectively, p = 0.001). The ANs who had attended the course used higher doses of morphine.

    CONCLUSIONS: 

    An educational intervention with a CVN course did not relate significantly to more efficient pain relief in suspected ACS during the first 15 min. However, this intervention was associated with more effective pain relief later on in the prehospital setting. Thus, a CVN course for ANs appears to be associated with reduced pain intensity among patients experiencing suspected ACS. This result needs however to be confirmed in further trials.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf