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  • 1.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wigerblad, Åse
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Department of Nursing Science, Karlstads universitet.
    Respecting dignity in forensic care: the challenge faced by nurses of maintaining patient dignity in clinical caring situations2013In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: We must recognise the importance of increased understanding for maintaining patient dignity to expand earlier formulated knowledge about caring ethics. Illuminations of this topic can create conditions for changing and developing care, as well as making caregivers’ preservation of dignity evident. The aim was to illuminate the meaning of maintenance of patient dignity in forensic care.

    Methods: A qualitative design with a phenomenological- hermeneutic approach was used to analyse and interpret focus group interviews with nurses in forensic care.

    Findings: In the text the meaning of maintenance of patient dignity was protection and respect but also brotherly humanity. Protection was shown outwards to cover or screen the patient and to guard against danger. The inner form was described as protecting the patients’ needs and arousing the patients’ protection resources. Respect was shown outwards to take the patient seriously and to show others that patients are to be reckoned with, inwards in teaching patients to create respect and in teaching patients to expect respect from others. Meeting patients with human brotherhood was shown in doing “the little extra” and demonstrating human similarity.

    Conclusions: The new understanding will enable nurses to plan and provide professional care, based on caring science.

  • 2.
    Kumpula, Esa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Ekstrand, Per
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Doing things together': male caregivers' experiences of giving care to patients in forensic psychiatric care2013In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 64-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies into work carried out by male caregivers in a care environment in which male patients and male caregivers constitute a majority are lacking. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the experiences of male caregivers in providing care for patients in forensic psychiatric care. The study has a qualitative design and data were constituted by interviews with six male caregivers at a clinic of forensic psychiatry in a town in central Sweden. The method of analysis chosen was latent content analysis. The results consist of four themes: Activities as a component of care, Social training as the basis of care, Feelings of powerlessness and Seeing the complete person. The experience that comes out most distinctly in the descriptions given by caregivers involves performing activities together with the patients. The activities had different significances and these contribute to creating a more secure care relationship, in which the boundaries between personnel and patients become less clear. Physical activities contribute to recreating the patient's health. Social training appears as a component of the care in which the significance of rules and routines in the operations was integrated. Feelings of powerlessness arise when the caregivers do not experience that the care given on the ward contributes to recreating health for the patients. Seeing the complete person behind the crime constitutes the themes that can be said to summarize the meaning of the work carried out by male caregivers.

  • 3.
    Lassenius, Oona
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Arman, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Self-reported health and physical activity among community mental healthcare users2013In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to survey the self-reported health and physical activity in a sample of community mental healthcare users in a city of Sweden. The study was conducted through a cross-sectional design with participants requested to fill out a self-report questionnaire. Participants (n =103) were persons with psychiatric disabilities living in residential psychiatric settings and/or participating in daily activities provided by community mental healthcare services. The results showed that the group is affected with serious risk factors, such as high body mass index, low rated extent and frequency of physical activity and low self-estimated general state of health. Even though some difficulties associated with the answering process of this questionnaire emerged, these self-reported results clearly confirm the fact that persons with psychiatric disabilities constitute a vulnerable group in need for health-promoting caring activities and interventions.

  • 4.
    Lindwall, L.
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ.
    Boussaid, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Kulzer, Sonja
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Wigerblad, Åse
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Patient dignity in psychiatric nursing practice2012In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 569-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accessible summary Dignity is a concept that relates to health and mental health care. Dignity is also related to human rights. In psychiatric nursing practice, caregivers want to promote good and safe care, and take their ethical responsibility to safeguard the patient's dignity in caring situations. Dignity may emerge when the will and courage to be there for someone else is allowed to permeate the caring acts. There are situations where a patient's dignity is offended in psychiatric nursing practice. Where value conflict exists, these may lead to conflict in the human being and result in guilt and shame for the caregivers. Abstract Professional nurses have an ethical responsibility to protect and preserve the patients' dignity. The aim of this study was to describe how nurses experienced incidents relating to patients' dignity in a psychiatric nursing practice. A hermeneutic approach was used and data were collected using the critical incident technique. Data included 77 written critical incidents, which were interpreted by using a hermeneutic text interpretation. The findings show preserved dignity caregivers have the courage to be present, and offended dignity caregivers create powerlessness taken away by the patient. These findings show that patients' dignity in a psychiatric nursing practice can be preserved when caregivers act on their ethical responsibility. When patients' dignity is offended, the caregiver has become an inner value conflict, something they have been a part of against their own will.

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