mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bruno, Linnea
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Financial oppression and post-separation child positions in Sweden2018In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 181-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper deals with post-separation child positions in two domains of practice in the Swedish welfare state: welfare benefits such as financial aid and child contact. The area of concern is financial oppression in the context of parental separation. Empirically, the study draws upon three types of material: interviews with victimised mothers, court orders in welfare benefit appeals and court orders in contested contact cases. Findings suggest that financial abuse in the context of parental separation is a non-question in the domain of welfare benefits, and in the domain of child contact framed as a conflict between equal parties. Object without voice and with needs ignored was the typical child position in welfare benefits cases, whereas incompetent subject was more prominent in child contact cases. Age order as a form of domination may be reinforced by the practice of both domains.

  • 2.
    Callegari, Julia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kullberg, Christian
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gendered debt: A scoping study review of research on debt acquisition and management in single and couple householdsIn: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current economic environment, social workers are increasingly being required to support households that suffer from severe debt burdens. However, previous research has questioned if social workers are sufficiently prepared to meet this emerging form of financial exclusion, especially from a gender perspective. Thus, there is a risk that interventions for indebted households will overlook gender-specific, inequality-generating patterns in the acquisition and management of debts. With this in mind, the aim of this article is to provide an overview of the existing literature related to gender and household debt, in order to enable a development towards gender-aware social work interventions that equally support women and men in creating financially stable lives. The results show that gender dynamics affect how households acquire and manage their debt. These dynamics result in different forms and levels of debt for women and men, unequally divided spheres of responsibility for managing the acquired debt burden and differences in their willingness to seek debt advice. Unequal power relations between men and women and gender-stereotypic expectations are found to be key factors for explaining these results. The results are discussed in relation to practical implications for social policy and social work practice.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Pringle, Keith
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    His Helping hands: Adult daughters’ perceptions of fathers with a caregiving responsibility2013In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 235-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women's position as informal carers has been taken for granted in social policy and social professions, while relatively few discussions have elaborated on caring as a later life activity for men and the impact on family care. This study explores the processes connected to informal caregiving in later life through the position of adult daughters of older fathers engaged with long-term caregiving responsibilities for a partner. A sample of eight daughters, with fathers having primary caregiving responsibility for their ill partners was recruited and in-depth interviews were carried out and analysed according to qualitative procedures. The daughters' descriptions of their relationships with their fathers show that being an older man who engages in caring can have a positive outcome on relations. Even if some of the daughters have doubts about their fathers “masculine authenticity”, all of them appear to cherish “his helping hands” as a carer and closer more intimate relationships with their fathers. Caring for an old and frail spouse may potentially present alternative ways of being a man beyond traditional ‘male activities’ and that caring might also sometimes involve a re-construction of gender identities. It is suggested that social work professionals may use a gendered understanding to assess and work strategically with daughters and other family members who support caring fathers.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Participation for children exposed to domestic violence?: Social workers’ approaches and children’s strategies2012In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 205-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores social workers’ approaches to children exposed to domestic violence and children’s strategies in encounters with these professionals in the context of family law proceedings. Investigator approaches as well as child strategies are reconstructed from children’s narratives. Furthermore, possible links between the social worker’s approach described by a particular child, and the child’s own strategies are outlined. Participation can offer children validation of their experiences and support their recovery after exposure to violence. However, it is suggested that it seems to be a challenging task for social workers to both validate children’s experiences of violence and simultaneously offer them participation in the investigation process.

  • 5.
    Hedin, Lena
    et al.
    institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete, Örebro universitet.
    Höjer, Ingrid
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Jokes and routines make everyday life a good life: On ‘doing family’ for young people in foster care in Sweden2012In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 700-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to identify inclusion practices in foster families by studying the everyday life of young people entering various types of foster family. Structure and warmth in the family stand out as important dimensions of everyday life. What is not so evident in previous research is the way emotional 'warmth' is created. In particular, joking, gentle teasing, and laughing, which in this paper stand out as important inclusion practices, seem to be rather unknown aspects in foster care, as is the importance of doing things together in everyday life. The young people’s contributions in creating a good family atmosphere are visible in the study, as is their capacity to adapt to a new family. Daily routines normalise the adolescents´ everyday life. Negotiations make them part of important decisions, and may strengthen them as social agents. Foster parents´ positive attitude towards birth family facilitates birth parents´ support to their children. In this case study, mixed qualitative methods are used: interviews, network maps, ‘beepers’, and video recordings in the foster home.

  • 6.
    Jess, Kari
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Socioeconomic evaluation of a correctional programme in Sweden: long-term effects2005In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 399-417Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kullberg, Christian
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Fäldt, Johannes
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gender differences in Social workers assessments and help-giving strategies towards single parents2008In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 445-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates Swedish male and female social workers' assessments and help-giving strategies towards single parents applying for income support. The study was carried out with the help of a vignette distributed as a mail questionnaire. Results show that social workers tend to conform to assessments and help-giving strategies that are consistent with expectations linked to their own gender role.

  • 8. Sandberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Pringle, Keith
    Keeping the family balance: adult daughters’ perspectives on roles and strategies when supporting caring fathers2009In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 233-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian countries represent a progressive approach to gender equality and transitions of traditional gender roles but little attention has been paid to gender equality in old age and how normative constructions of gender intersect in the lives of family carers. The aim of this study was to understand how adult daughters experience their roles and strategies when supporting fathers caring for an ill mother. A sample of eight daughters shared their experiences through in-depth interviews. The findings show that the daughters provide substantial and crucial effort and are intimately involved in the caring for their father and the sole contributors towards the emotional support of their fathers. They tend to devote a lot of energy towards picturing their family as 'normal' in terms of the family members adopting traditional roles and activities inside as well as outside the family context. In conclusion, the lack of understanding about gender as a 'norm producer' is something that needs to be further elaborated upon in order for professionals to encounter norm-breaking behaviours. The daughters' position as family carers is often assumed and taken for granted since the intersecting structures that impact on the situations of the daughters are largely invisible.

  • 9.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Care managers’ perceptions of eHomecare: a qualitative interview study2019In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, no 4, p. 634-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To implement information and communication technology (ICT) in elderlycare can be a challenge for healthcare organisations. In Sweden, caremanagers (CMs) are responsible for offering ICT as a new part ofhomecare, i.e. eHomecare. The aim of this study was to focus on CMs’perspectives and describe their perceptions of eHomecare. The studyhas a qualitative approach. Semi-structured interviews based onvignettes were conducted with 12 CMs in a medium-sized municipalityin central Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis. Thefindings showed that CMs are influenced by surrounding organisationsand relatives in their decision to grant eHomecare. There were alsodifficulties in CMs’ management of eHomecare. Furthermore, eHomecarewas perceived to improve the quality of everyday life for older. It isunderstood that the management of eHomecare is a challenging taskfor CMs and a complex mission. Interactions among CMs, relatives, careproviders, and other factors as for example CMs’ own attitudes have animpact on CMs’ decisions.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf