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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Astvik, Wanja
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Klas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Div Insurance Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Work Conditions, Recovery and Health: A Study among Workers within Pre-School, Home Care and Social Work2014In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 1654-1672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigated the working conditions associated with the accumulation of stress and lack of recovery and how recovery is related to health. The study group was employed in pre-school, home care and social work (n = 193). Recovery was assumed to be an explanatory variable for the relations between work and health. The response rate on a survey was 79 per cent. Cluster analysis identified three groups: the 'Recovered' (36 per cent of the total group) and 'Not Recovered' (25 per cent) and the 'In-between' (39 per cent). The Not Recovered displayed the whole chain of risk factors, involving difficult working conditions to which they responded with increased compensatory strategies. Despite this group having significantly greater reports of ill health, work absenteeism was not greater, which is likely related to their substituting sickness absence with sickness presence. As many as 43 per cent of the social workers were found to belong to the Not Recovered group. Multiple regression analyses controlling for background variables revealed that the Not Recovered group had a significantly higher relative risk for poor self-rated health than those in the Recovered group. Even sharper increases in relative risk existed for the other five symptoms that were analysed. Practical implications and new research questions are discussed.

  • 2.
    Astvik, Wanja
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Welander, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Larsson, Robert
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Reasons for Staying: A Longitudinal Study of Work Conditions Predicting Social Workers’ Willingness to Stay in Their OrganisationIn: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive staff turnover within the statutory social services is a serious problem in Sweden and in other European countries. This study examines which work conditions predict social workers’ willingness to stay in their organisation. A web-based questionnaire was used to gather data. The participating social workers responded to two questionnaires over a one-year period. To identify the social workers who wanted to stay and also remained in the organisation, the group ‘Stayers’ (n = 1,368) consisted of social workers who reported low intentions to quit at T1. The group ‘Leavers’ (n = 1,182) were social workers who had actually resigned at T2. The data were analysed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The multivariate analysis shows that the work conditions that predicted staying in the organisation were low degrees of conflicting demands and quantitative demands, high degrees of openness and human resource orientation in the organisation and a high degree of perceived service quality. The results are discussed in relation to public management and managerial responsibility to create sustainable work conditions that facilitate the provision of good social services for citizens.

  • 3.
    Mosson, R.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasson, H.
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Wallin, L.
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exploring the role of line managers in implementing evidence-based practice in social services and older people care2017In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 542-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study explored the vital role of line managers, namely the managerial level directly above employees, in effectively implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) from their own perspectives. Interviews were carried out with twenty-eight line managers within social services and older people care in seven Swedish municipalities. Thematic analysis was performed. Findings revealed that managers in social care perceived their role as important in implementing EBP. However, notable differences were observed between the two settings, where social services managers had more knowledge and held more positive attitudes towards working according to EBP, and described a more active role in the implementation process than managers in older people care. Overall, the implementation of EBP was performed ad hoc rather than systematically, and with little consideration to analysis of needs according to the local context and limited focus on follow-up and sustainability. This study highlighted that line managers in social services and older people care have different prerequisites for implementing EBP, and are greatly dependent on organisational strategies and context. Gaining knowledge of line managers' perceptions is essential for making informed decisions regarding the support required to achieve EBP in social care, and thus for providing the best possible care for clients. 

  • 4.
    Mosson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Richter, Anne
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hasson, Henna
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    The Impact of Inner and Outer Context on Line Managers’ Implementation Leadership2018In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 1447-1468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Line managers have an important role in leading implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). In this task, they are highly influenced by their context. However, little is known about how contextual factors impact managers’ implementation leadership. The aim of the present study is to explore how contextual factors influence line managers’ leadership when implementing EBP. Twenty-eight semi-structured interviews were performed with line managers in social care. A hybrid thematic analysis was carried out. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research Framework (CFIR) was used to guide the deductive analysis approach. Findings showed that contextual factors in all of CFIR’s inner setting constructs and in two constructs of the outer-setting domain (Cosmopolitanism and External resources and funding) had a high practical impact on managers’ implementation leadership. However, many of the contextual factors were either not offered to or did not actually reach the managers, which means that they had a limited impact in practice. Moreover, several factors only had a positive practical impact in interaction with other factors, rather than independently. Future research should systematically consider interactions between contextual factors. Identifying factors that have a potential impact in practice may help inform support initiatives to aid managers in developing their implementation leadership. 

  • 5.
    Tafvelin, Susanne
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Westerberg, Kristina
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    The First Year of Service: A Longitudinal Study of Organisational Antecedents of Transformational Leadership in the Social Service Organisations2018In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 430-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this longitudinal interview study, we have strived to advance the understanding of how organisational factors may hinder the emergence of transformational leadership among first line managers in social service organisations. By interviewing managers in a Swedish social service organisation during their first year of leadership, we first identified leadership ideals and then asked them to identify factors that hinder the performance of this leadership. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data and the results revealed that the managers strived for a transformational leadership, but several factors in the organisation made it difficult to lead in the way they intended. Hindering factors were identified both at the organisational level, such as 'top-down management', 'financial strain' and 'continuous change', and in the managers' own working environment in terms of no support', 'high work-load', 'limited influence', 'administrative tasks' and 'distance to employees'. This study contributes to our understanding of organisational antecedents of transformational leadership as well as the premises of transformational leadership in social service organisations.

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