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  • 1.
    Arnardóttir, R. H.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sörensen, Stefan E.
    Mälardalen University.
    Ringqvist, I.
    Center for Clinical Research, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Larsson, K.
    Lung and Allergy Research, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    No increase in walking distance on repeated tests in COPD patients with exercise-induced hypoxaemia2007In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of retesting on the 12-min walking distance (12MWD) in patients with moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with and without exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH) and to evaluate whether baseline characteristics derived before walking influence on variation of repeated tests. Fifty-seven COPD patients, mean age 66 (range 47 84) years, performed three 12-min walk tests within 1 week. Before and after each test, oxygen saturation (pulse oximetry, SpO 2), heart rate, breathing frequency, peak expiratory flow, and subjective ratings of exertion and dyspnoea were measured. EIH was defined as a fall in SpO 2 below 90% at the first walk test. The 12MWD did not increase on repeated testing in the EIH group. In the non-EIH group, the 12MWD increased by 12% (p<0.001) from test 1 to test 2 and by 4% (p<0.001) from test 2 to test 3. No day-to-day variation was observed in pre-walking characteristics. At least one training test is needed in non-EIH patients with COPD, as their effort and performance on the 12-min walk test increases on retesting (learning effects). In patients with EIH, the term "training test" is not relevant, as their walking distance did not homogeneously increase on repeated testing.

  • 2.
    Edwards, Ian
    et al.
    University of South Australia.
    Wickford, Jenny
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Ahmed Adel, Aziz
    Physical Therapy Institute Kabul.
    Thoren, Judy
    International Assistance Mission.
    Living a moral professional life amidst uncertainty: Ethics for an Afghan physical therapy curriculum2011In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Hammer, C.
    et al.
    PrimärvårdsRehab Södra, Rehab Årsta, Årsta, Sweden.
    Degerfeldt, L.
    tockholm Norr sjukgymnastik, Åkersberga, Sweden.
    Denison, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Mechanical diagnosis and therapy in back pain: Compliance and social cognitive theory2007In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe social cognitive theory (SCT) constructs and exercise compliance, and to explore relations between SCT variables and exercise compliance in patients with lumbar derangement syndrome during mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT) treatment. Fifty-eight subjects completed the study. The data collection included measures relevant to SCT constructs and compliance: outcome expectations and expectancies, self-efficacy expectations, behavioural capability, and self-reported frequency of exercise occasions, as well as treatment outcomes regarding pain intensity and disability. Data were collected at five occasions during treatment and during a 2-month follow-up period. The subjects received a mean of three movements (range one to five) as home exercises. The mean number of weeks with these exercises was 4 (range 1-6). High median scores were found in all variables related to SCT. The median compliance rates varied between 79% (week 1) and 91% (week 3) during treatment. During the first follow-up month, the compliance rate was 79% and during the second month of follow-up 62%. Pain intensity and disability decreased during treatment. Although there were no significant correlations between the SCT variables and exercise compliance, the descriptive data are in line with SCT.

  • 4.
    Nilsagård, Y.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, L. -G
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Denison, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Self-perceived limitations of gait in persons with multiple sclerosis2007In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 136-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to describe the self-perceived walking limitations of those with multiple sclerosis (MS) using the Swedish translation of the 12-item MS Walking Scale [MSWS-12 (S)], and to investigate it for concurrent validity and internal consistency. Eighty-one persons, recruited from five centres in Sweden, were tested using the Four Square Step Test (FSST), the Timed Up and Go cognitive (TUGcog) and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) in randomized order, besides filling in the MSWS-12 (S). Perceived limitations were reported in 89-96% of the sample, i.e. performance of activities related to standing or walking, decreased speed and distance, and qualitative aspects; and self-perception regarding the ability to run being most extremely affected. Correlations between the MSWS-12 (S) and the objective tests were low, as were correlations between items in the MSWS-12 (S) and the BBS or time taken to complete the TUGcog or the FSST. The internal consistency was acceptable for nine of the 12 items (0.7-0.84). The majority of the sample experienced limitations in several aspects of their walking ability. Concurrent validity was not established between the MSWS-12 (S) and the other tests. There may be a discrepancy in self- perception of disability and objective measures. The use of subjective, as well as objective measures is recommended.

  • 5.
    Nilsson, B-M
    et al.
    Southern Älvsborgs Hospital, Borås, Sweden .
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Head posture in patients with whiplash-associated disorders and the measurement method's reliability - A comparison to healthy subjects2005In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 13-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) are a major problem for healthcare providers and sufferers. Neck pain is one of the most common WAD, and forward head posture may contribute to neck pain. Objective methods for assessing head posture are necessary in the evaluation of postural correction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of the goniometer and to examine differences in head posture inpatients with WAD compared with healthy individuals. Twenty-seven consecutive patients and 40 healthy subjects matched for age and gender were included in the study. Head position relative to shoulders in standing was assessed by three examiners. The inter-rater reliability for the goniometer showed an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95. The absolute reliability for the three testers was 1.8°. An independent t-test showed that the difference in head posture between the patients and controls was significant. The patient group showed more forward head posture.Patients with WAD had more forward head posture than persons without neck problems. The goniometer proved to be reliable with high inter-rater reliability in assessing the head position relative to shoulders.

  • 6.
    Revenäs, Åsa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    Central Hospital Västerås.
    Leppert, J.
    Central Hospital Västerås.
    A randomized study of two physiotherapeutic approaches after knee ligament reconstruction2009In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 30-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about whether physiotherapeutic knee classes provide additional benefits in the rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). In the present randomized study, we compare the results of a hospital-based programme, Knee-class Therapy (KT), with an individual programme with limited physiotherapy appointments, Guided Therapy (GT), 6 and 12 months after knee surgery, in terms of function, activity level, muscle strength, knee-joint stability and knee-joint mobility. After ACLR, 24 patients were randomized to the KT group and 27 to the GT group. Fourteen patients in the KT group and 24 in the GT group completed the physiotherapy appointments as prescribed. At 6 months after surgery, the median Lysholm knee score was significantly higher in the KT group. At the 12-month follow-up, the GT group's improvement in the Lysholm knee score was significantly greater than the KT group's. Non-compliance was high in the KT group. The subgroup analysis of the non-compliers in the KT group showed that their improvement in the Lysholm knee score between 0 and 12 months was significantly greater than that of the KT group's compliers. These results could indicate that an individual exercise programme with limited physiotherapy appointments might be as effective as physiotherapeutic knee classes.

  • 7.
    Sandborgh, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åsenlöf, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Denison, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Implementing behavioural medicine in physiotherapy treatment: Part I: Clinical trial2010In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 2-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the capacity of the Pain Belief Screening Instrument (PBSI) to discriminate between subgroups for targeting of treatment, investigate effects of treatment tailored to patients' individual and functional goals, and identify a suitable treatment dosage for patients with low risk of disability. Explorative study, Part I. Design: Randomized, controlled clinical trial with four treatment conditions. Methods: Patients in primary healthcare (n=45) with musculoskeletal pain for ≥4 weeks were included. PBSI-identified subgroups were validated by comparing scores on four established instruments. Measures of disability and patients' ratings of global outcome were used to examine treatment effect. Results: PBSI data adequately defined patients with either high or low risk of disability. Patients in the tailored treatment rated global outcome as better than in the non-tailored treatment. No differences were found on disability measures. For the low-risk group, the brief tailored treatment was as effective as the non-targeted control treatment. Conclusion: The PBSI adequately defined subgroups. Tailored treatment was partially superior to physical exercise treatment. Targeting by treatment dosage was effective for low-risk patients but remains to be investigated for high-risk patients. Treatment integrity for tailored treatments was compromised and is to be further explored in the following study.

  • 8.
    Sandborgh, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åsenlöf, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Denison, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Implementing behavioural medicine in physiotherapy treatment: Part II: Adherence to treatment protocol2010In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: In a controlled clinical trial, targeted and tailored treatment strategies, based on cognitive–behavioural treatment principles were investigated. The intervention was aimed at patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain in primary healthcare. A preliminary examination indicated low treatment integrity for the tailored treatment. Therefore, the aim in this study was to evaluate physiotherapists' treatment adherence to a treatment tailored to physical, cognitive and behavioural factors of importance for the performance of patients' prioritized activities. Explorative study, Part II. Materials and Methods: Treatment documents for 18 patients, treated by four specially trained physiotherapists, were utilized for assessment of treatment adherence. A treatment integrity measure was developed, tested and used for evaluation of adherence to the treatment protocol. Results: Physiotherapists' adherence to the treatment manual was low concerning treatment components and the overall sequencing of the treatment. Intrapersonal physical and cognitive factors, and situational variations tied to the performance of prioritized activities targeted in treatment, were rarely found or specified in treatment documents. Statements about functional and causal relationships between determinants for activity performance were not documented or unspecified. Conclusion: The physiotherapists' adherence to the treatment protocol was low despite the pre-intervention training programme and supervision during the intervention period.

  • 9.
    Thunborg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Götell, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Reciprocal struggling in person transfer tasks: Caregivers’ experiences in dementia care2012In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study describes caregivers’ experiences of person transfer situations involving people with dementia. Method: Qualitative focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 10 caregivers; two groups with five persons each, including two men and eight women. The resulting data were extracted and condensed into meaning units and codes using content analysis. Findings: One main theme was formulated that represents the caregivers’ experiences of person transfer situations involving people with dementia: “Reciprocal struggle in person transfer tasks”. Five categories were formulated: “Becoming familiar and making contact”, “Risking one's own body to protect the resident from injury”, “Focused yet aware of the surroundings”, “Identifying needs to facilitate the person transfer” and “Struggling to be understood”. Conclusion: Person transfer situations involving people with dementia are subject to sudden changes. The ongoing challenge is to ensure a dynamic approach that can be adapted to the needs of the person with dementia at any given time. There is a need for more studies within the field about care and rehabilitation among people with dementia. We suggest that assessment of person transfer situations involving people with dementia and their caregivers is an important issue for further investigation and physiotherapeutic interventions.

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