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  • 1.
    Chusova, Olga
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Nolvak, H.
    Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Vanemuise 46, Tartu 51014, Estonia.
    Nehrenheim, Emma
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Truu, J.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Odlare, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Oopkaup, K.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Truu, M.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Effect of pine bark on the biotransformation of trinitrotoluene and on the bacterial community structure in a batch experiment2014In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, Vol. 35, no 19, p. 2456-2465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pine bark, a low-cost industrial residue, has been suggested as a promising substitute for granular activated carbon in the on-site treatment of water contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). However, the complex organic structure and indigenous microbial community of pine bark have thus far not been thoroughly described in the context of TNT-contaminated water treatment. This two-week batch study examined the removal efficiency of TNT from water by (1) adsorption on pine bark and (2) simultaneous adsorption on pine bark and biotransformation by specialized TNT-biotransforming microbial inocula. The bacterial community composition of experimental batches, inocula and pine bark, was profiled by Illumina sequencing of the V6 region ofthe 16S rRNA gene. The results revealed that the inocula and experimental batches were dominated by phylotypes belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family and that the tested inocula had good potential for TNT biotransformation. The type of applied inocula had the most profound effect on the TNT-transforming bacterial community structure in the experimental batches. The indigenous microbial community of pine bark harboured phylotypes that also have a potential to degrade TNT. Altogether, the combination of a specialized inoculum and pine bark proved to be the most efficient treatment option for TNT-contaminated water.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Lena
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mersch, Jacques
    Université de Metz, France.
    Transplanted aquatic mosses and freshwater mussels to investigate the trace metal contamination in the rivers Meurthe and Plaine, France1993In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, Environmental Technology, ISSN 0959-3330, Vol. 14, no 11, p. 1027-1036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aquatic mosses Cinclidotus nigricans and freshwater mussels Dreissena polymorpha were transferred at eight monitoring sites along the rivers Meurthe and Plaine (northeastern France) for a biological assessment of the trace metal contamination. Autochthonous Fontinalis antipyretica mosses were collected at the end of the experiment. The major contaminants detected in the organisms were Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn. A comparison between the native and the introduced bryophytes showed that the transfer technique was preferable to assess the recent pollution situation. In the case of the transplanted mosses, high initial levels of strongly bound Pb and Zn prevented an accurate assessment of the contamination with these two metals, since only little depuration occurred at unpolluted sites. A good qualitative agreement was observed between the indications obtained from the mosses and those obtained from the mussels, suggesting that both are suitable indicators for monitoring purposes. The observed quantitative disparities were attributed to inherent differences in the accumulation strategies of each sentinel organism. Due to specific uptake and depuration kinetics, mosses and mussels appeared to be complementary in the detection of various types of pollution.

  • 3.
    Kanders, Linda
    et al.
    Purac AB, Sweden.
    Areskoug, Therese
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Schneider, Yvonne
    Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Geramany.
    Ling, Daniel
    Purac AB, Sweden.
    Punzi, Marisa
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Beier, Maike
    Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Geramany.
    Impact of seeding on the start-up of one-stage deammonification MBBRs2014In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, Vol. 35, no 22, p. 2767-2773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treating nitrogen-rich reject water from anaerobically digested sludge with deammonification has become a very beneficial side stream process. One common technique is the one-stage moving bed bioreactors (MBBRs), which in comparison with the other deammonification techniques can be started up without seeding anammox bacteria. This study investigated the impact of biofilm seeding on the start-up of one-stage deammonification MBBRs. Two lab-scale reactors were run in parallel with partial nitritation for 56 days until 11% of the carrier area in one reactor was replaced with fully developed deammonification biofilm to work as the seeding material. The seeded reactor started nitrogen reduction immediately up to a plateau of 1.3gNm−2 d−1; after another 54 days on day 110, the reduction significantly increased. At the same time, the non-seeded reactor also started to reduce nitrogen due to deammonification. The development was followed with both nitrogen analyses and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. On day 134, the biofilm in both reactors contained >90% anammox bacteria and reached maximum nitrogen removal rates of 7.5 and 5.6gNm−2 d−1 in the seeded and non-seeded reactor, respectively. Over 80% of the inorganic nitrogen was reduced. In conclusion, the seeding did not contribute to a shorter start-up time or the achieved anammox enrichment, although it did contribute to a partial, immediate nitrogen reduction. The boundary conditions are the most important factors for a successful start-up in a deammonification MBBR system.

  • 4.
    Schwede, Sebastian
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Lindmark, Johan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Klintenberg, Patrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Jääskelainen, A
    Savonia Univ Appl Sci, Environm Engn, Kuopio, Finland.
    Suhonen, A.
    Savonia Univ Appl Sci, Environm Engn, Kuopio, Finland.
    Laatikainen, R.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Sch Pharm, Kuopio, Finland.
    Hakalehto, E.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Sch Pharm, Kuopio, Finland.
    Using slaughterhouse waste in a biochemical-based biorefinery – results from pilot scale tests2017In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, p. 1275-1284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel biorefinery concept was piloted using protein-rich slaughterhouse waste, chicken manureand straw as feedstocks. The basic idea was to provide a proof of concept for the production ofplatform chemicals and biofuels from organic waste materials at non-septic conditions. Thedesired biochemical routes were 2,3-butanediol and acetone–butanol fermentation. The resultsshowed that hydrolysis resulted only in low amounts of easily degradable carbohydrates.However, amino acids released from the protein-rich slaughterhouse waste were utilized andfermented by the bacteria in the process. Product formation was directed towards acidogeniccompounds rather than solventogenic products due to increasing pH-value affected by ammoniarelease during amino acid fermentation. Hence, the process was not effective for 2,3-butanediolproduction, whereas butyrate, propionate,γ-aminobutyrate and valerate were predominantlyproduced. This offered fast means for converting tedious protein-rich waste mixtures intoutilizable chemical goods. Furthermore, the residual liquid from the bioreactor showedsignificantly higher biogas production potential than the corresponding substrates. Thecombination of the biorefinery approach to produce chemicals and biofuels with anaerobicdigestion of the residues to recover energy in form of methane and nutrients that can beutilized for animal feed production could be a feasible concept for organic waste utilization.

1 - 4 of 4
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