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  • 1.
    Alayón, C. L.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, 551 11, Sweden.
    Säfsten, K.
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, 551 11, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Barriers and Enablers for the Adoption of Sustainable Manufacturing by Manufacturing SMEs2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 2364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have inherent characteristics, which require specific solutions for improving the sustainability performance of their operations. The purpose of this paper is to increase the knowledge on barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing by manufacturing SMEs and to provide insights into what enablers can be used to overcome existing barriers. Taking, as a starting point, a systematic literature review, this paper presents a categorization of barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing by manufacturing SMEs. In total, seven categories for classifying the barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing within SMEs were identified: organizational, managerial and attitudinal; informational; governmental; financial; training and skills development; market and business context; and technological. Additionally, this study elaborates on what barriers could be mitigated through the enablers. This study found specific enablers with the potential to mitigate a significantly higher number of barriers and referred to them as ‘critical enablers’. SMEs aiming to adopt sustainable manufacturing practices or improve their sustainability performance are encouraged to focus on the enablers in these categories. This paper synthesizes and facilitates interpretation of the existing body of evidence on barriers and enablers for adopting sustainable manufacturing in SMEs. 

  • 2.
    Badasjane, Viktoria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Coordination of Digital Transformation in International Manufacturing Networks—Challenges and Coping Mechanisms from an Organizational Perspective2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 2204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coordinating the digital transformation of globally dispersed factories within international manufacturing networks has become a critical issue for competitiveness, yet there has been limited attention paid to this issue in previous research. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to, from an organizational perspective, explore the challenges in coordinating the digital transformation in an international manufacturing network and the coping mechanisms to overcome those challenges. A case study is conducted in a manufacturing company within the heavy vehicle industry, thus contributing to the limited empirical research covering coordination of digital transformation. The data is analyzed through organizational structure and design theory, and the findings are mapped into four core dimensions: differentiation, integration, centralization, and formalization. The results show 15 challenges and 11 coping mechanisms for coordination of digital transformation in international manufacturing networks, identifying the significance of the coordination uncertainty within the formalization dimension that is particularly exposed to the changes induced by digital transformation. The findings include the need for a coordination-oriented organizational structure that incorporates how and where coordination can be actualized. The research implications contribute with new insights by providing a detailed description of the created organizational structure and, in contrast to previous research, focuses specifically on the coordination aspect of digital transformation in an international manufacturing network. 

  • 3.
    Buhr, Katarina
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst; Linkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Roth, Susanna
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Sweden.
    Stigson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Sweden.
    Climate Change Politics through a Global Pledge-and-Review Regime: Positions among Negotiators and Stakeholders2014In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 794-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pledge-and-review is an essential pillar for climate change mitigation up until 2020 under the auspices of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. In this paper, we build on a survey handed out to participants at the Seventeenth Conference of Parties in 2011 to examine to what extent climate negotiators and stakeholders agree with existing critiques towards pledge-and-review. Among the critique examined, we find that the one most agreed with is that the pledges fall short of meeting the 2 degree target, while the one least agreed with is that pledges are voluntary. We also find that respondents from Annex 1 parties are more critical than respondents from Non-Annex 1 parties. Negotiators display strikingly similar responses regardless of where they are from, while there is a remarkable difference between Annex 1 and Non-Annex 1 environmental non-governmental organizations. We build on these results to discuss the legitimacy of pledge-and-review.

  • 4.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Klaff, Sara
    Zako, Rania
    Sannö, Anna
    Elevating B2B Mobility with Sharing Autonomous Electric Vehicles: Exploring Prerequisite Criteria and Innovative Business Models2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 18, article id 13757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition towards a circular economy compels manufacturing companies in the transportation industry to reassess how they create, deliver, and capture value for their customers. Autonomous electric vehicles, with their advanced connectivity, autonomy, and efficiency, offer innovative business opportunities and services. However, there is limited knowledge concerning the sharing of autonomous electric vehicles in the business-to-business (B2B) market, particularly for industrial manufacturing companies. This study aims to identify the prerequisite criteria and potential innovative business models for sharing autonomous electric vehicles within a B2B context. To investigate this phenomenon, the study employs a case study approach within the heavy-duty vehicle industry, which involves a vehicle manufacturer and customers from a specific industry sector. The findings reveal that economic gain, service quality, and accessibility serve as prerequisite criteria for sharing autonomous electric vehicles in a B2B context. Furthermore, by leveraging a morphological framework, the study outlines five business model scenarios to explore the potential of sharing autonomous electric vehicles in enhancing B2B mobility. This research contributes to the field of business model innovation in a B2B context by introducing a model that delineates both the prerequisite criteria and potential business model concepts for the B2B sharing of autonomous electric vehicles. 

  • 5.
    Diamantidou, Eirini
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hosain, M. L.
    Hitachi Energy, Västerås, 72226, Sweden.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Recent Advances in Boundary Layer Ingestion Technology of Evolving Powertrain Systems2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 3, article id 1731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing environmental concern during the last years is driving the research community towards reducing aviation’s environmental impact. Several strict goals set by various aviation organizations shifted the research focus towards more efficient and environmentally friendly aircraft concepts. Boundary Layer Ingestion (BLI) is currently investigated as a potential technology to achieve different design goals such as energy efficiency improvement and noise emission reductions in the next generation of commercial aircraft. The technology principle is to place the propulsive unit within the boundary layer generated by the airframe body. Although several studies showed its theoretical benefits, a multidisciplinary nature is introduced in the design phase. This imposes new challenges on the current design tools. An increasing number of publications are focusing on assessing this technology while taking into account interlinks between different disciplines. The goal of this work is to review the current state-of-the-art of BLI evaluation studies. Particular focus is given to the underlying assumptions of each work, the methodology employed, and the level of fidelity of the tools used. By organizing the available work in a comprehensive manner, the up-to-date results are interpreted. The current trends and trade-offs emerging from studies are presented. Through reviewing the ongoing published work, the next steps for further development of the methods that will assess this technology are derived. 

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Mattias
    et al.
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malefors, Christopher
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bergström, Pauline
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Emelie
    Swedish National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson Osowski, Christine
    Department of Food Studies, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Quantities and quantification methodologies of food waste in Swedish hospitals2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 8, article id 3116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To move towards a sustainable food system, we cannot continue to waste substantial amounts of the food produced. This is especially true for later stages in the food supply chain, where most sub-processes consume resources in vain when food is wasted. Hospitals are located at the end of the food supply chain and the sector has high levels of food waste. This study investigated food waste quantification practices in Swedish hospitals, examined whether a questionnaire is an appropriate methodology for such mapping, and compiled data for the sector in order to determine the amount of food waste and its composition. A questionnaire was sent to all 21 regional authorities, formerly known as county councils, responsible for hospitals in Sweden. The questionnaire responses were supplemented with food waste records from three regions that organize the catering in a total of 20 hospitals. The results showed that it is common practice in most hospitals to quantify food waste, with quantification focusing on lunch and dinner in relation to the number of guests served. It was also clear that waste quantification practices have been established for years, and in the majority of the hospitals studied. The data revealed that, in comparison with other sectors, food waste was still high, 111 g guest(-1) meal(-1), consisting of 42% plate waste, 36% serving waste, and 22% kitchen waste. However, there was great variation between hospitals, which, in combination with well-established, standardized waste quantification routines, meaning that this sector has strong potential to spread best practices and improve overall performance in reducing food waste generation.

  • 7.
    Fell, Terence
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Mattsson, Johanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Dalarna Univ, Div Business Adm & Management, Falun, Sweden.;Future Proof Cities Grad Sch, Gavle, Sweden..
    The Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Housing as a Potential Contributor to Sustainable Cities and Communities: A Systematic Review2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 14, article id 7783Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today cities face the increasing negative consequences of the unsustainable course society is set on. Climate change, biodiversity loss and increasing spatial segregation are testament to this. The effects of these issues often exceed the coping capacity of individual urban housing developers. Thus, an antidote to the current neoliberal trend must be found in collaborations such as public-private partnerships (PPP). Here the shortcomings and limitations of PPP and its potential ability to solve the problem of unsustainable urban development are investigated. Using the Doughnut Economics (DE) model as a general guide, a systematic literature review is conducted. The results reveal evidence that PPPs are unjust and exclude local actors from collaborations. Hence, resident participation and inclusion is considered the best strategy for PPP to evolve as a future guarantor of the sustainable city. First, however, major differences in the character of issues that connect the global model of sustainability to the harsh reality of the local context need to be addressed. This gap concerns the city's social foundation and ecological ceiling. The DE model applied herein is an excellent tool to test the scope and depth of local collaborations such as PPPs and reflect on international treaties such as SDGs.

  • 8.
    Fell, Terence
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Rydenstam, Tove
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Buli, Benti Geleta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    King, A. C.
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States.
    Bälter, Katarina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Citizen science in sweden’s stigmatized neighborhoods2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 18, article id 10205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the synthesis of outside versus inside perspectives, this paper weighs the positive attributes of the so-called deprived place against its negative media image. Applying the concept of territorial stigmatization, small-scale citizen science was conducted to gain a unique understanding of the Swedish neighborhood from within. With the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal 11 in mind, this approach enables researchers to reach otherwise difficult to access young urban outcasts and probe the potential to overcome their community’s lack of political influence. An overlap between local media narratives and urban outcasts’ perceptions of “drug and crime” and “football and school” was revealed. Yet, this first-generation study also painted a somewhat different picture of the stigmatized neighborhood, supplying new insights about places that matter most for marginalized young males. In this Swedish case, their pictures revealed that the local corner market, football court and youth club act as an antidote for the effects of stigmatization. This Our Voice citizen science initiative proved to be a good measure of two communities’ abilities to withstand stigmatization, which is either tainted by false perceptions from the outside or weakened by crime from within. Finally, attempting to bypass structural discrimination, citizen scientists’ findings and researchers’ conclusions were made available to students, colleagues and guests at a poster presentation hosted by Mälardalen University and to concerned politicians from Eskilstuna City Hall as well as the broader public via a local Swedish television station. 

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  • 9.
    Guziana, Bozena
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Only for Citizens?: Local Political Engagement in Sweden and Inclusiveness of Terms2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 14, article id 7839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In both policy and research, civic engagement and citizen participation are concepts commonly used as important dimensions of social sustainability. However, as migration is a global phenomenon of huge magnitude and complexity, citizen participation is incomplete without considering the political and ethical concerns about immigrants being citizens or non-citizens, or 'the others'. Although research on citizen participation has been a frequent topic in local government studies in Sweden, the inclusiveness and exclusiveness of terms used in the context of local political engagement, which are addressed in this article, has not received attention. This article examines the Swedish case by analyzing information provided by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and by websites of all 290 municipalities as well terms used in selected research publications on local participation. Additionally, this article studies the effectiveness of municipal websites in providing information to their residents about how they can participate in local democracy. The results show that the term citizen is commonly and incorrectly used both by local authorities and the Association. The article concludes that the term citizen is a social construction of exclusiveness and the use of the term citizen should be avoided in political and civic engagement except for the limited topics that require formal citizenship.

  • 10.
    Iplik, Esin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Aslanidou, Ioanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hydrocracking: A Perspective towards Digitalization2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 17, article id 7058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a world of fast technological advancements, it is increasingly important to see how hydrocracking applications can benefit from and adapt to digitalization. A review of hydrocracking processes from the perspective of modeling and characterization methods is presented next to an investigation on digitalization trends. Both physics-based and data-based models are discussed according to their scope of use, needs, and capabilities based on open literature. Discrete and continuous lumping, structure-oriented lumping, and single event micro-kinetic models are reported as well as artificial neural networks, convolutional neural networks, and surrogate models. Infrared, near-infrared, ultra-violet and Raman spectroscopic methods are given with their examples for the characterization of feed or product streams of hydrocracking processes regarding boiling point curve, API, SARA, sulfur, nitrogen and metal content. The critical points to consider while modeling the system and the soft sensor are reported as well as the problems to be addressed. Optimization, control, and diagnostics applications are presented together with suggested future directions of interdisciplinary studies. The links required between the models, soft sensors, optimization, control, and diagnostics are suggested to achieve the automation goals and, therefore, a sustainable operation.

  • 11.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Customizing management strategies for product introduction in low-volume manufacturing: Enhancing information content quality2024In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 16, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies characterized by high-mix and low-volume production exhibit distinct features that exert a significant influence on the product introduction process. The quality of information exchange between product design and production interfaces becomes paramount in low-volume manufacturing. Consequently, there exists a pressing need to explore various methods for adapting and customizing management strategies to align with the unique characteristics of low-volume manufacturing and its associated product introduction processes. While this knowledge is critical in low-volume manufacturing, most existing studies focus on the management aspects of high-volume manufacturing. Therefore, this study investigates the customization of management strategies for product introduction in low-volume manufacturing to enhance the quality of information content. Drawing upon a longitudinal analysis of new product introductions within a low-volume manufacturing company, this study identified four management strategies, namely securing a production test and verification plan, revising the role of product introduction management, formal design and production coordination plan, and lessons learned management plan. The paper explains how the examined company adapted and implemented product introduction management strategies to facilitate the enhancement of information content quality across three key stages: pre-implementation, post-implementation, and subsequent modification and refinement of strategies following the initial round of implementation. By shedding light on these strategies, this study offers a comprehensive understanding of management approaches for product introduction in low-volume manufacturing. The study makes a valuable contribution to the discourse on information quality management and design-production interface in low-volume manufacturing and low-volume product introduction literature.

  • 12.
    Kamranfar, S.
    et al.
    Department of Architecture, Built Environment and Construction Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, 20133, Italy.
    Damirchi, F.
    Construction Engineering and Management, Department of Civil Engineering, Payame Noor University, Tehran, 19395-4697, Iran.
    Pourvaziri, M.
    Department of Architecture, University of Tehran, Tehran, 14395 515, Iran.
    Abdunabi Xalikovich, P.
    Department of Accounting, Tashkent Institute of Finance, Tashkent, 10012, Uzbekistan.
    Mahmoudkelayeh, S.
    Department of Architecture, University of Tehran, Tehran, 14395 515, Iran.
    Moezzi, R.
    Association of Talent under Liberty in Technology (TULTECH), Tallinn, 10615, Estonia .
    Vadiee, Amir
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    A Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling Analysis of the Primary Barriers to Sustainable Construction in Iran2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 18, article id 13762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper outlines the obstacles to sustainable construction growth in Iran and thereafter examines the effect and relation between these barriers and the direction of sustainable construction growth as one of the essential objectives for achieving sustainable cities and infrastructure. The study is applied for research purposes that are based on descriptive survey data gathering and correlational data analysis techniques. The statistical population for this study consists of 120 construction-related engineers and university professors who were assessed on a five-point Likert scale. Using SmartPLS software version 4, the responses to the questionnaire were examined. The Kolmogorov–Smirnov assessment was utilized to evaluate the normalcy of the variables, as this assessment is typically employed for this purpose. For data analysis, the PLS (partial least squares) method was used, while SEM (structural equation modeling) methods have been used to assess the study hypotheses. Cronbach’s alpha and the composite reliability coefficient (CR) were applied to determine the instrument’s viability, and the results show that the coefficient connected to all variables is above 7.0, which is an acceptable value. The AVE (average variance extracted) was also used to evaluate the questionnaire’s validity, which was greater than 0.4 and deemed acceptable for coefficients of significance (T-values), coefficient of predictive power (Q2), and coefficient of determination (R2). The obtained results support and confirm all research hypotheses, including that the identified obstacles directly affect the performance of sustainable construction. According to the results of the Friedman test, the legal restrictions variable (CL) is the most significant obstacle to sustainable construction in Iran, with a rank of 4.24. The indicators of political limits (CP) and social and cultural constraints (CSC) came in at second and third, respectively. The results could help government officials make better decisions about where to focus their attention and how to distribute scarce resources. 

  • 13.
    Kulkov, Ignat
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Abo Akad Univ, Fac Sci & Engn, Turku 20500, Finland.;Mälardalen Univ, Sch Innovat, Digital & Circular Ind Serv Res Grp, Div Prod Realizat, POB 325, S-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden.;EDHEC Business Sch, Chair Foresight Innovat & Transformat, 24 Ave Gustave Delory, F-59100 Roubaix, France..
    Hellström, Magnus
    Abo Akad Univ, Fac Sci & Engn, Turku 20500, Finland.;Univ Agder, Sch Business & Law, N-4879 Grimstad, Norway..
    Tsvetkova, Anastasia
    Abo Akad Univ, Fac Sci & Engn, Turku 20500, Finland..
    Malmberg, Johan
    Abo Akad Univ, Fac Sci & Engn, Turku 20500, Finland..
    Sustainable Cruise Tourism: Systematic Literature Review and Future Research Areas2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 10, article id 8335Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cruise shipping industry has existed for centuries. However, sustainability is a relatively new trend that could make a big difference and someday impact the industry. A growing body of research on sustainable cruise tourism includes studying changes among industry stakeholders, internal and external processes, and more. However, until now, there have been no comprehensive and systematic reviews of the academic literature on this topic and proposals for future research areas. The sample for our research consists of 56 articles structured into the following themes and subthemes: (1) corporate social responsibility (public interaction and emissions management); (2) territory management (collaboration with stakeholders and infrastructure development); (3) training in sustainable behavior (passengers, ship personnel, and other stakeholders). These themes fully explore the various use cases for sustainable cruises, forming a conceptual framework for understanding trends for the industry's sustainable development. We direct the attention of other researchers to the following areas for further research: GHG emissions of cruising; biodiversity impacts; quantitative understanding of the target audience and their participation in sustainability financing; in-depth understanding of the reasons for cooperation between stakeholders; identifying the true motivation for participation in sustainable development; the long-term trends; and how the shipping industry is adapting to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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  • 14.
    Lidskog, R.
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sch Humanities Educ & Social Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Orebro Univ, Sch Humanities Educ & Social Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Standring, A.
    Orebro Univ, Sch Humanities Educ & Social Sci, SE-70281 Orebro, Sweden.
    COVID-19, the climate, and transformative change: Comparing the social anatomies of crises and their regulatory responses2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 16, article id 6337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite forces struggling to reduce global warming growing stronger, there has been mixed success in generating substantive policy implementation, while the global spread of the coronavirus has prompted strong and far-reaching governmental responses around the world. This paper addresses the complex and partly contradictory responses to these two crises, investigating their social anatomies. Using temporality, spatiality, and epistemic authority as the main conceptual vehicles, the two crises are systematically compared. Despite sharing a number of similarities, the most striking difference between the two crises is the urgency of action to counter the rapid spread of the pandemic as compared to the slow and meager action to mitigate longstanding, well-documented, and accelerating climate change. Although the tide now seems to have turned towards a quick and massive effort to restore the status quo-including attempts to restart the existing economic growth models, which imply an obvious risk for substantially increasing CO2 emissions-the article finally points at some signs of an opening window of opportunity for green growth and degrowth initiatives. However, these signs have to be realistically interpreted in relation to the broader context of power relations in terms of governance configurations and regulatory strategies worldwide at different levels of society. 

  • 15.
    Lin, Jing
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Division of Operation and Maintenance, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, 97187, Sweden.
    Shen, J.
    Division of Construction Technology, Dalarna University, Falun, 79188, Sweden.
    Silfvenius, C.
    Research and Development Laboratory, SCANIA Technical Center, SCANIA AB, Södertälje, 15132, Sweden.
    Human-Centric and Integrative Lighting Asset Management in Public Libraries: Insights and Innovations on Its Strategy and Sustainable Development2024In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 16, no 5, article id 2096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an era of rapidly advancing lighting technology and evolving public library roles, this study introduces a groundbreaking strategy for human-centric and integrative lighting asset management. Embracing both visual and non-visual effects, “integrative lighting” aims to enhance users’ physiological and psychological well-being. Despite technological progress, notably with LEDs, current asset management often lags, relying on reactionary measures rather than proactive strategies. As public libraries transform into dynamic learning hubs, the significance of indoor lighting, impacting both physical health and holistic well-being, cannot be understated. Yet, many existing solutions are based on controlled lab tests, bypassing the diverse real-world needs of public libraries. Aiming to explore and develop human-centric and integrative lighting asset management strategies to optimize lighting environments in public libraries, this research offers a cohesive approach encompassing context identification, a management framework, and a maturity assessment model. Additionally, this study highlights the synergy between the role of the lighting asset manager, ISO 55000 principles, and these foundational strategies. This holistic approach not only reinvents lighting in public libraries but also aligns it with the broader Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), advocating for light as a conduit of comprehensive human betterment. The current study is primarily qualitative in nature. While this study is based on public libraries in Nordic countries, the implications and findings can be of interest and value to a broader international audience.

  • 16.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    et al.
    Södertörn University.
    Mostaghel, Rana
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Circular business model challenges and lessons learned: an industrial perspective2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 30, p. 1-19, article id 739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both practitioners and researchers are concerned about resource deficiencies on the planet earth and agree that circular business models (CBMs) represent solutions to move towards zero waste, improving environmental impacts and increasing economic profit. Despite all of the benefits of CBMs, the implications are not widely available, and failure rates are high. Thus, there is a need to identify the obstacles that stand in the way of CBM transition. This paper aims to identify the primary challenges of CBMs. Multiple case studies are employed, incorporating six companies and data gleaned from 17 in-depth interviews. Theoretical and managerial implications are described at the end of the study.

  • 17.
    Paris, Bas
    et al.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Bioecon & Agrotechnol, Dimarchou Georgiadou 118, Volos 38333, Greece..
    Michas, Dimitris
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Bioecon & Agrotechnol, Dimarchou Georgiadou 118, Volos 38333, Greece..
    Balafoutis, Athanasios T.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Bioecon & Agrotechnol, Dimarchou Georgiadou 118, Volos 38333, Greece..
    Nibbi, Leonardo
    Univ Florence, Dept Ind Engn, I-50139 Florence, Italy..
    Skvaril, Jan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Pimentel, Duarte
    TERINOV Parque Ciencia & Tecnol Ilha Terceira, P-9700702 Terra Cha, Portugal.;Univ Azores, Ctr Estudos Econ Aplicada Atlant CEEAplA, P-9500321 Ponta Delgada, Portugal..
    da Silva, Carlota
    TERINOV Parque Ciencia & Tecnol Ilha Terceira, P-9700702 Terra Cha, Portugal..
    Athanasopoulou, Elena
    Univ Peloponnese, Dept Business & Org Adm, Kalamata 24100, Greece..
    Petropoulos, Dimitrios
    Univ Peloponnese, Dept Agr, Kalamata 24100, Greece..
    Apostolopoulos, Nikolaos
    Univ Peloponnese, Dept Management Sci & Technol, Tripoli 22100, Greece..
    A Review of the Current Practices of Bioeconomy Education and Training in the EU2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 954Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study conducts a review of the current practices of bioeconomy education and training in the EU; as well as the associated methodologies; techniques and approaches. In recent years; considerable efforts have been made towards developing appropriate bioeconomy education and training programs in order to support a transition towards a circular bioeconomy. This review separates bioeconomy education approaches along: higher education and academic approaches, vocational education and training (VET) and practical approaches, short-term training and education approaches, and other approaches. A range of training methodologies and techniques and pedagogical approaches are identified. The main commonalities found amongst these approaches are that they are generally problem based and interdisciplinary, and combine academic and experiential. Higher education approaches are generally based on traditional lecture/campus-based formats with some experiential approaches integrated. In contrast, VET approaches often combine academic and practical learning methods while focusing on developing practical skills. A range of short-term courses and other approaches to bioeconomy education are also reviewed.

  • 18.
    Pehme, Kaur-Mikk
    et al.
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
    Orupold, Kaja
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
    Kuusemets, Valdo
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
    Tamm, Ottar
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för biologi och miljö (BOM), Sweden.
    Tamm, Toomas
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
    Field Study on the Efficiency of a Methane Degradation Layer Composed of Fine Fraction Soil from Landfill Mining2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 15, p. 1-16, article id 6209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main components of landfill gas are methane and carbon dioxide. Emissions of methane, a strong greenhouse gas, can be minimized by in situ oxidation in the bioactive cover layer. Typically, organic-rich porous materials such as compost are used for this process. In this study, the material for a biocover was obtained from the same landfill by landfill mining. The objective was to study the spatial distribution of gases and the efficiency of methane degradation in the biocover. The methane and carbon dioxide emissions were measured at 29 measuring points six times on the surface and once at a depth of 0.5 m. The highest values of both gases from the surface were recorded in July 2015: 1.0% for CO(2)and 2.1% for CH4. Deeper in the cover layer, higher values of methane concentration were recorded. The results showed that (a) methane from the waste deposit was entering the biocover, (b) the migration of methane to the atmosphere was low, (c) fluctuations in the composition of gases are seasonal, and (d) the trend in the concentration of CH(4)over time was an overall decrease. The described cover design reduces the CH(4)emissions in landfills using elements of circular economy-instead of wasting natural soils and synthetic liners for the construction of the final cover layer, functional waste-derived materials can be used.

  • 19.
    Sannö, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Johansson, M. T.
    Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thollander, P.
    Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wollin, J.
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjögren, B.
    IVL, Swedish Environmental Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Approaching sustainable energy management operations in a multinational industrial corporation2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large share of the energy efficiency improvement measures available for industrial companies remains unadopted due to the existence of various barriers to energy efficiency. One of the main means of overcoming barriers to energy efficiency is via energy management operations. The major parts of the published scientific papers have covered energy management on a company level or on a sector level. However, so far, the literature is scarce regarding empirical studies on energy management on a corporate level. With the aim of filling the research gap, the aim of this paper is to empirically assess the performance of an in-house energy management program adoption from the year of initiation and four years ahead in the multinational company Volvo CE. The paper was conducted as a case study including a participative approach, which has not previously been done in energy management research. This paper adds value, through complementing the existing literature on energy management on a factory or sector level, by highlighting the importance of leadership, speed of execution, and cultural transformation on a corporate level. 

  • 20.
    Sund, Louise
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Örebro University.
    Pashby, K.
    Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom.
    'Is it that We Do Not Want them to have washing machines?': Ethical global issues pedagogy in swedish classrooms2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 3552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to sustainable development target 4.7, by 2030, all signatory nations must ensure learners are provided with education for sustainable development and global citizenship. While many national curricula provide a policy imperative to provide a global dimension in curriculum and teaching, mainstreaming an approach to teaching about sustainable development through pressing global issues requires strong attention to what happens between students and teachers in the classroom. In this article, we aim to help teachers think through an ongoing reflexive approach to teaching by bridging important theoretical and empirical scholarship with the day-to-day pedagogies of global educators. This collaborative praxis offers an actionable approach to engaging with values, conflicts and ethical consequences towards bringing global issues into teaching and learning in a critical and fruitful way. Our results show that teachers and students can both experience discomfort and experience a sense of significance and worthiness of engaging in a more critical approach. In addition, if we critically reflect and support students in doing so, as these teachers have done, we open up possibilities for approaches to global issues pedagogy that come much closer to addressing the pressing issues of our deeply unequal world.

  • 21.
    Sund, Per
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Lysgaard, Jonas Greve
    Danske Pedagogiske Universitet, Århus.
    Reclaim “Education” in Environmental and Sustainability Education Research2013In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1598-1616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nascent research area of Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) needs a firm grounding in educational philosophy in order to focus more on education. This conclusion is based on experiences at two recent conferences focusing on research in this field. Issues related to content, attitudes and long-term aims dominated at these conferences, while learning processes were often taken for granted.

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  • 22.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    The Role of Economics and Democracy in Institutional Change for Sustainability2014In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Sustainability, no 6, p. 2755-2765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutional change for sustainable development does not happen by itself. Individuals and organizations function as actors to influence development processes. Reference is made to a "political economic person" (PEP) guided by his/her ideological orientation and "political economic organization" (PEO), guided by its "mission". Leaving present unsustainable trends is a matter of politics and ideology and even power positions, where democracy plays a crucial role. The perspectives of influential (and other) actors are essential in facilitating (or hindering) change. I will discuss ideas of the role of science in society, mainstream economics in relation to institutional economics in the spirit of K. William Kapp and Gunnar Myrdal as well as neo-liberalism as ideology (where neoclassical economics has contributed to strengthen the legitimacy of neo-liberalism). Various aspects of inertia and flexibility in institutional change processes, such as path dependence, are discussed. Emphasis is on the role of economics and how a strengthened democracy can open the door for a degree of pluralism.

  • 23.
    Tarnovskaya, Veronika
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Lund Sch Econ & Management, Dept Business Adm, S-22363 Lund, Sweden..
    Melén Hånell, Sara
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Stockholm Sch Econ, Dept Mkt & Strategy, S-11383 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tolstoy, Daniel
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Dept Mkt & Strategy, S-11383 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Proactive Corporate Sustainability via Social Innovation-A Case Study of the Hennes & Mauritz Grand Challenge in Bangladesh2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 2, article id 599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to explore how a multinational enterprise can use social innovations to drive change and solve grand challenges in an emerging market context. This paper brings market-shaping literature into a sustainability context, particularly by studying the implementation of social innovations in an emerging market context. Specifically, the study involves an in-depth qualitative study of H&M's fair living wages program in Bangladesh. We find that H&M is tackling utterances of grand challenges revealed by orchestrating social innovation in collaborations with local stakeholders. Social innovation is carried out in ongoing projects involving multiple stakeholders. The study contributes to current literature by revealing that multinational enterprises indeed can use social innovation to drive change in emerging markets, although this requires long-term commitment, an ability and willingness to shape the surrounding business environment, and a prominent standing among key stakeholders.

  • 24.
    Vincevica-Gaile, Zane
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Sachpazidou, Varvara
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bisters, Valdis
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Klavins, Maris
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Anne, Olga
    Department of Engineering, Klaipeda University, LT-91225 Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Grinfelde, Inga
    Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia.
    Hanc, Emil
    Mineral and Energy Economy Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-261 Krakow, Poland.
    Hogland, William
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Jani, Yahya
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Pal, Divya
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Pehme, Kaur-Mikk
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Shanskiy, Merrit
    Chair of Soil Science, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Saaremäe, Egle
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Pilecka-Ulcugaceva, Jovita
    Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia.
    Celms, Armands
    Department of Land Management and Geodesy, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia.
    Rudovica, Vita
    Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Hendroko Setyobudi, Roy
    Waste Laboratory, University of Muhammadiyah Malang, Malang 65114, Indonesia.
    Wdowin, Magdalena
    Mineral and Energy Economy Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-261 Krakow, Poland.
    Zahoor, Muhammad
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara Dir Lowever 18800, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.
    Aouissi, Hani Amir
    Scientific and Technical Research Centre on Arid Regions (CRSTRA), Biskra 07000, Algeria.
    Krauklis, Andrey E.
    Institute for Mechanics of Materials, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Zekker, Ivar
    Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Mineral and Energy Economy Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-261 Krakow, Poland.
    Applying Macroalgal Biomass as an Energy Source: Utility of the Baltic Sea Beach Wrack for Thermochemical Conversion2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 21, article id 13712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global resource limits and increasing demand for non-fossil energy sources have expanded the research on alternative fuels. Among them, algal biomass is designated as a third-generation feedstock with promising opportunities and the capability to be utilized for energy production in the long term. The paper presents the potential for converting beach wrack containing macroalgal biomass into gaseous fuel as a sustainable option for energy production, simultaneously improving the organic waste management that the coastline is facing. Beach wrack collected in the northern Baltic Sea region was converted by gasification technology applicable for carbon-based feedstock thermal recovery, resulting in syngas production as the main product and by-product biochar. Proximate and ultimate analysis, trace and major element quantification, detection of calorific values for macroalgal biomass, and derived biochar and syngas analysis were carried out. A higher heating value for beach wrack was estimated to be relatively low, 5.38 MJ/kg as received (or 14.70 MJ/kg on dry basis), but produced syngas that contained enough high content of CH4 (42%). Due to macroalgal biomass specifics (e.g., high moisture content and sand admixture), an adjusted gasification process, i.e., the combination of thermochemical procedures, such as mild combustion and pyrolytic biomass conversion, might be a better choice for the greater economic value of biowaste valorization

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  • 25. Vincevica-Gaile, Zane
    et al.
    Teppand, Tonis
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Krievans, Maris
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö universitet, Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US), Sweden.
    Klavins, Maris
    Setyobudi, Roy
    Grinfelde, Inga
    Rudovica, Vita
    Tamm, Toomas
    Shanskiy, Merrit
    Saaremae, Egle
    Zekker, Ivar
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Towards Sustainable Soil Stabilization in Peatlands: Secondary Raw Materials as an Alternative2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, p. 1-26, article id 6726Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation of construction works on weak (e.g., compressible, collapsible, expansive)soils such as peatlands often is limited by logistics of equipment and shortage of available andapplicable materials. If preloading or floating roads on geogrid reinforcement or piled embankmentscannot be implemented, then soil stabilization is needed. Sustainable soil stabilization in anenvironmentally friendly way is recommended instead of applying known conventional methodssuch as pure cementing or excavation and a single replacement of soils. Substitution of conventionalmaterial (cement) and primary raw material (lime) with secondary raw material (waste and byproductsfrom industries) corresponds to the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations,preserves resources, saves energy, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Besides traditional materialusage, soil stabilization is achievable through various secondary raw materials (listed accordingto their groups and subgroups): 1. thermally treated waste products: 1.1. ashes from agricultureproduction; 1.2. ashes from energy production; 1.3. ashes from various manufacturing; 1.4. ashesfrom waste processing; 1.5. high carbon content pyrolysis products; 2. untreated waste and newproducts made from secondary raw materials: 2.1. waste from municipal waste biological treatmentand landfills; 2.2. waste from industries; 3. new products made from secondary raw materials:3.1. composite materials. Efficient solutions in environmental engineering may eliminate excessiveamounts of waste and support innovation in the circular economy for sustainable future.

  • 26.
    Walshe, Nicola
    et al.
    Department of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK.
    Sund, Louise
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap, Sweden.
    Developing (Transformative) Environmental and Sustainability Education in Classroom Practice2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Wannheden, Carolina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    ostenson, Claes-Goran
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Endocrine & Diabet Unit, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pukk Harenstam, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Pediat Emergency Dept, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stenfors, Terese
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Div Learning, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    What's the Name of the Game?: The Impact of eHealth on Productive Interactions in Chronic Care Management2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 5221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic care management is dependent on productive interactions between patients and healthcare professionals. Digital health technologies (eHealth) open up new possibilities for improving the quality of care, but there is a limited understanding of what productive interactions entail. This study explores characteristics of productive interactions to support self-care and healthcare in the context of eHealth use in diabetes care. We collected qualitative data based on interviews with nurses and responses to open-ended survey questions from patients, prior to and post using an eHealth service for self-monitoring and digital communication. We found that eHealth's influence on productive interactions was characterized by unconstrained access, health parameter surveillance, and data-driven feedback, with implications for self-care and healthcare. Our findings indicate that eHealth perforates the boundaries that define interactions under traditional, non-digital care. This was manifested in expressions of uncertainty and in blurred boundaries between self-care and healthcare. We conclude that the attainment of a sustainable eHealth ecosystem will require healthcare to acknowledge eHealth as a disruptive change that may require re-organization to optimally support the productive use of eHealth services for both patients and staff, which includes agreement on new routines, as well as social interaction rules.

  • 28. Westin, Love
    et al.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    EPSI Rating, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Parmler, Johan
    EPSI Rating, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sustainable Development as a Driver for Customer Experience2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 6, article id 3505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of sustainable development (SD) has become widely accepted among nations, organisations, and individuals. Recent quantitative and conceptual models have indicated relations between stakeholder perspectives of SD, brand image, and customer satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to estimate a Sustainable Development Index (SDI) as an easy applicable survey item which is used to estimate customer perceptions. By applying a PLS path model, comprising of the EPSI models variables and the suggested items of SDI, this study evaluates relationships between aspects of customer experience and customers' perception of SD. The estimated score of SDI is further analysed as an approximate measure of universal SD items applied in the literature. As such, the study contributes to the research community by further integrating customer perception of SD in frameworks measuring customer experience. The study data comprises cross-sectional multi-industrial customer perception data, consisting of 606 final respondents. The results show empirical support of the constructed index relation as an approximate measure of universal SD items and as a driving aspect of the customer experience.

  • 29.
    Zaccaria, Valentina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Rahman, Moksadur
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Aslanidou, Ioanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    A review of information fusion methodsfor gas turbine diagnostics2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 22, article id 6202Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The correct and early detection of incipient faults or severe degradation phenomena in gas turbine systems is essential for safe and cost-effective operations. A multitude of monitoring and diagnostic systems were developed and tested in the last few decades. The current computational capability of modern digital systems was exploited for both accurate physics-based methods and artificial intelligence or machine learning methods. However, progress is rather limited and none of the methods explored so far seem to be superior to others. One solution to enhance diagnostic systems exploiting the advantages of various techniques is to fuse the information coming from different tools, for example, through statistical methods. Information fusion techniques such as Bayesian networks, fuzzy logic, or probabilistic neural networks can be used to implement a decision support system. This paper presents a comprehensive review of information and decision fusion methods applied to gas turbine diagnostics and the use of probabilistic reasoning to enhance diagnostic accuracy. The different solutions presented in the literature are compared, and major challenges for practical implementation on an industrial gas turbine are discussed. Detecting and isolating faults in a system is a complex problem with many uncertainties, including the integrity of available information. The capability of different information fusion techniques to deal with uncertainty are also compared and discussed. Based on the lessons learned, new perspectives for diagnostics and a decision support system are proposed. 

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  • 30.
    Öhman, J.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro, 701 82, Sweden.
    Sund, Louise
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Örebro University, Örebro, 701 82, Sweden.
    A didactic model of sustainability commitment2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 6, article id 3083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes a model that describes and frames sustainability commitment. The model is based on didactic theory and pragmatic philosophy and is informed by several empirical studies on environmental and sustainability education (ESE) practice. The intention is for the model to serve as a critical perspective on ESE practices in secondary and upper secondary schools, and to offer a framework for the development of future practice with emphasis on teachers’ choices of content and teaching methods. The model suggests that a sound commitment is situated in the in-tersection of the intellectual, emotional, and practical aspects of sustainability. It is argued that: The intellectual aspect is essential for giving the commitment scientific rigor and a critical stance; emotions are vital for students to become dedicated; and skills to carry out appropriate actions for change is necessary for playing an active role in providing a sustainable transformation of society. 

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