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  • 1.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH.
    Goal seeking and goal oriented projects - trajectories in the temporary organisation2015In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the theory development of “temporary organizing.” Design/methodology/approach – The paper advances the theory of the temporary organization by applying a process ontological-perspective.

    Findings – This research note conceptualizes “the temporary organization” as constantly changing across time and space; as shifting between two empirically driven modes: “goal seeking” and “goal oriented.” This is done through the shift of the trajectory of the particular “project” at hand. Practical implications – Based on the theoretical suggestions in the paper, further research is encouraged to find empirical support of and to develop its claims.

    Originality/value – Despite a call for taking the “organizing”-aspect of temporary organizations seriously, there is still a need for theory development of the area. By introducing the concept of “trajectories” into the studies of temporary organizations, the paper builds a theoretical framework through which such studies may be undertaken.

  • 2.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Deviations and the breakdown of project management principles2009In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 53-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of how unexpected events (deviations) are handled and how the limited time available in a project affects the possibilities for reflection and knowledge creation. Since deviations will inevitably occur and they will substantially increase project costs, studies of them are imperative. When only a fraction of the project management literature has focused on the actuality of the project this study gives insights into the practice of project management. Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on an exploratory, in-depth case study of a power plant project found in an integrated provider of projects of this type. The projects were followed by participative observations during ten weeks of onsite visits. Findings – The results show that in contrast to contemporary project management theories, the management of deviations was found to be primarily informal. The reason for this was two-fold. First, there was not enough time to use formal procedures. Second, if the formal routines were to be followed, the window of opportunity would be lost, making the decisions that follow useless. Third, two types of reflection were noted: structured collective reflection and contextual reflection, the former corresponding to formal routines and the later to the solution of deviations which is seen as a trigger for spreading practices around the organization. Research limitations/implications – The research presented that projects should be studied from a practice point of view, where deviations might be a good starting point. Moreover, it is suggested that there is a need to broaden the studies of reflection to accommodate other organizational levels and time spans. Practical implications – The case has several suggestions for practitioners. First, small deviations should be paid attention to. Second, bureaucracy hampers flexibility and the organization should rather set up organizational structures, i.e. dual structures, to allow for a smoother process. Third, networks and confidence were found to be essential for the process. Finally, there is a need to pay attention to different time frames when managing deviations. Originality/value – The paper develops a more intricate view of project organizing coming from the new Project-as-Practice agenda. Rather than focusing on what should be done, it focuses on what is done, which is a research area that needs further attention

  • 3.
    Ingvarsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Åbo Akademi, Turku, Finland.
    Kier, C.
    PMG-Project Management Group, WU Wien, Wien, Austria.
    Project stakeholder engagement through gamification: what do we know and where do we go from here?2023In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 152-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how gamification may be used for project stakeholder engagement. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the results of a systematic literature review of extant research concerning the gamification of projects. Based on this, an agenda for future studies is outlined. Findings: Extant research on the gamification of projects is scarce and scattered among various disciplines, but the engineering fields dominate. The research performed does indicate that gamification may be used for involving stakeholders in projects, primarily by promoting learning, but also by engaging them, motivating action and solving problems. Research limitations/implications: In several cases, extant research display poor quality in research design and a lack in cross-disciplinary perspectives, which means that more research is needed. The users’ perspective is often lacking. Furthermore, the ideas gamification might be “hidden” within other technologies. Practical implications: The findings of this research may assist project management practitioners in the endeavor of adopting gamification principles to better involve stakeholders. Originality/value: The study fills a gap in summarizing the research on how gamification may be used to promote project stakeholder engagement. Based on this, it proposes a research agenda for future research on the use of gamification to promote project stakeholder engagement.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet,Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per Erik
    Luleå tekniska universitet,Sweden.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Luleå tekniska universitet,Sweden.
    The importance of hard project management and team motivation for construction project performance2018In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 275-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Hard project management practices, based on strict planning and control, are traditionally applied in construction projects, although research frequently promotes the importance of teams for various project outcomes. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of hard project management and team motivation for process performance in construction projects. A hypothesis tested is that hard project management can impair process performance if team motivation is not promoted.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper presents and empirically tests a structural equation model, with and without a mediating link between hard project management and process performance, based on data from a survey of 2,175 respondents, representing contractors and clients involved in 109 Swedish construction projects.

    Findings

    The results confirm that hard project management is best conveyed through teams to enhance process performance. “Path analysis,” using the model with the mediating link, confirms that neglecting team motivation can significantly impair process performance.

    Research limitations/implications

    The data set provides unusually high representation of views of contractors and clients involved in diverse Swedish construction projects. Thus, the results have likely relevance in other project-based industries and/or national settings, but this possibility requires further investigation.

    Originality/value

    The findings show that team motivation is a key process performance factor; hard project management may indeed be important, but its effects will be enhanced by (and partially mediated through) team motivation. Thus, the findings have important theoretical and practical implications for the development of project management practices.

  • 5.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The logic and integration of coproductive research approaches2021In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 13-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to clarify the methodological logic of coproductive research approaches like action research, collaborative research, interactive research and participatory research to clarify its effectiveness and scientific qualities in high quality knowledge production, and show a way that it can be integrated with institutionalized textbook science.  

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper clarifies the character of coproduction as research methodology concept, the logic of coproductive research approaches, and its characteristics compared to quantitative and qualitative methodology. A model for characterizing research approaches from leading textbook social science is developed to specify the character of coproductive research approaches and support integration in mainstream research methodology discussions. 

     

    Findings –The paper develops a research methodology framework for coproductive logic and approaches to research, as well as a model to support the integration of these approaches in mainstream research methodology. 

     

    Research limitations/implications – The developed model of coproductive research approach is not empirically described. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test and further develop the framework and model in relation to cases and designs of research projects. 

     

    Practical implications –The paper is helpful for guiding the design of coproductive research in practice, i.e., in research project development or in research methodology education. 

     

    Social implications –The development of coproductive research approaches supports making science relevant and useful for solving pressing problems and improving social conditions. It also is enabling stakeholders to participate in research and development processes, thus the democratization of research and knowledge production. 

     

    Originality/value – The paper contributes to integration of the family of coproductive approaches in mainstream research methodology discussion through the development and elaboration of a framework for organizing the description and development of coproductive research approaches. The aim is that the framework is valuable for both academics, practitioners and students in designing coproductive research projects. 

  • 6.
    Sjögren, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fagerström, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Callavik, Magnus
    ABB China, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Managing emergent changes: ad hoc teams' praxis and practices2018In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1086-1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how emergent changes are handled in research and development (R&D) projects. R&D projects' business potential lies in their exploration of the unknown; conversely, this makes them uncertain endeavours, prone to emergent changes. Design/methodology/approach Uses a single-case-study design, based on a projects-as-practice perspective and a soft systems methodology (SSM) analysis, to map how ad hoc R&D teams handle emergent changes, specifically the solution identification and assessment phase and the implementation plan. An R&D project in the power industry, involving over 250 engineers, was analysed. Findings This paper shows how emergent changes are handled differently from initiated changes during the decision-making phase. The system analysis shows that the most critical factors for managing these changes are: collective reflection between project parties; and including experienced engineers in implementation-plan reviews. Practical implications The results are of relevance both to R&D managers aiming to improve team performance and to general project management. Informal notions of emergent changes can be formalised in the change request process. Weaknesses in the project team's organisation are highlighted, and details of how of how to mitigate these are provided. Originality/value Combines engineering-design and project-management research on emergent changes, adding to the former regarding people-organisational and strategic issues. Furthers understanding of the projects-as-practice approach and emergent change (deviations) handling by ad hoc teams in a project environment. SSM has not previously been used to explore aspects of projects-as-practice, and this is a novel way of adding to the body of knowledge on project praxis and practise.

  • 7.
    Svejvig, P.
    et al.
    Department of Management, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Sankaran, S.
    School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Guest editorial: Second special issue on action research and variants in project studies and project management2023In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Svejvig, Per
    et al.
    Department of Management, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Sankaran, Shankar
    School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Guest editorial: Special issue on action research and its variants in project studies and project management2021In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
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