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  • 1.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    et al.
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Dept Med Sport & Fitness Sci, S-79188 Falun, Sweden; Reg Sormland, Res & Dev Sormland, S-63217 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Baathe, K S
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Dept Med Sport & Fitness Sci, S-79188 Falun, Sweden.
    Ekholm, A
    Reg Sormland, Res & Dev Sormland, S-63217 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Tonkonogi, M
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Dept Med Sport & Fitness Sci, S-79188 Falun, Sweden.
    High Challenge Exercise and Learning Safe Landing Strategies among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 12, article id 7370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited research on optimal exercise programs that effectively decrease falls and fall-related injuries in older populations. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aimed to explore the effects of a 12-week Judo4Balance program on falling techniques, physical and psychological functions, health status, and physical activity levels among 200 community-dwelling older adults (79% women and 21% men) with a mean age of 72 years. The 200 participants were randomly allocated for the Judo4Balce program (n = 100) or control group (n = 100). The RCT intervention started in mid-January 2020 and was abruptly interrupted because of the COVID-19 pandemic. A restart of the RCT was initiated in September 2021, and the 12-week intervention was offered to two groups. This study reports the results from three points of assessment: baseline, 20-month follow-up, and 12-week postintervention. At 20 months follow-up, the control group had significantly decreased physical activity levels (summer p = 0.002 and winter p = 0.003); similar changes were not seen in the exercise group. In the exercise group, learning falling techniques in 6-9 weeks led to sustained fall competence at 20 months follow-up. Further, significant improvements in physical function (exercise group p = 0.009 and control group p < 0.001) and learning falling techniques (p < 0.001 for both groups) were noted in both groups after the 12-week intervention. This effective, supervised, group-based, high-challenge multicomponent exercise program needs to be further evaluated for possible impact on falls and fall-related injuries.

  • 2.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Dalarna University, Falun, 791 88, Sweden; Research and Development in Sörmland, Region Sörmland, Eskilstuna, 632 17, Sweden.
    Strömqvist Bååthe, K.
    Dalarna University, Falun, 791 88, Sweden.
    Ekholm, A.
    Region Sörmland, Eskilstuna, 632 17, Sweden.
    Tonkonogi, M.
    Dalarna University, Falun, 791 88, Sweden.
    Short Multicomponent Group Exercise Intervention Promotes Long-Term Physical Activity Habits among Community-Dwelling Older Adults during COVID-19 Restrictions: A Cohort Study2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 22, article id 15140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether strength, balance, body mass index, falls self-efficacy, activity levels, self-rated health, and participation in a multicomponent exercise intervention could predict physical activity levels after 5 months of self-quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study included baseline data of 200 community-dwelling older adults (79% women, 21% men) with a mean age of 72 years who participated in a randomized controlled trial investigating a multicomponent exercise program, with 7-month follow-up survey data of their physical activity levels. The results showed significant associations with the activity levels at the 7-month follow-up. The activity levels (odds ratio (OR): 2.83, 95% CI: 1.20–6.71), the self-rated health score (2.80, 1.42–5.53), and being allocated to a specific multicomponent group-based exercise program (2.04, 1.04–4.00) showed a significant association with the activity habits at the 7-month follow-up. As this study suggests, besides the physical activity levels and the self-rated health score, participation in a high challenge multicomponent exercise program was significantly associated with physical activity levels at the 7-month follow-up. This study indicates that a relatively short multicomponent group exercise program (6–9 weeks) can motivate individuals to sustain their own training and activity levels even several months after the program has been paused or terminated. Identifying older adults’ physical activity levels and self-rated health scores and prescribing multicomponent group-based exercise programs to promote sustained physical activity habits may be a successful alternative to provide for older adults in the future. 

  • 3.
    Asztalos Morell, Ildikó
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, 75007, Sweden.
    De, S.
    College of Nursing, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University (BVDU), Pune, 411043, India.
    Mahadalkar, P.
    College of Nursing, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University (BVDU), Pune, 411043, India.
    Johansson, Carl
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Silence or voice?: Agency freedom among elderly women living in extended families in urban India2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 23, p. 1-18, article id 8779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preferential form of living for the elderly in India is within the extended family. India is undergoing rapid economic development, an increase in mobility, and changes in gender norms due to an increase in women’s labour force participation, which places challenges on traditional intergenerational relationships. Ageing and the well-being of the elderly is a rising concern, especially considering that their proportion of the population is expected to grow rapidly in coming decades. There is a lack of universal state provision for the elderly’s basic needs, which is especially profound for elderly women, since most do not have an independent income. This leaves the elderly dependent upon the benevolence of their adult children’s families or other relatives. This paper explores, with help of narrative analysis and critical contributions from capability theory, elderly women’s agency freedoms and how this can be contextualised with their varying capability sets. With help of Spivak’s notion of the silent subaltern, the paper anchors elderly women’s abilities to voice to their agency freedom. The master narrative of the silent supportive wife and side-lined mother-in-law as well as three counter-narratives explore alternative agencies taken by elderly women.

  • 4.
    Baudin, Katarina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Sundström, Angelina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Borg, Johan
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Decision-Making Is in the Making! Aspects of Decision-Making in the Area of Assistive and WelfareTechnology—A Qualitative Study2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, article id 4028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assistive and welfare technology (AT/WT) has been introduced as a way of facing an ageing population and providing support for older adults in their daily lives. There is much research concerning the assessment and recommendation of AT/WT to individual end-users. However, few studies have explored AT/WT decision-making from a managerial perspective. This study explores what aspects influence decision-making in assistive technology organizations concerning new technology procurements. The study is based on interviews with 24 managers engaged in assistive technology organizations, representing 13 of 21 regions in Sweden. The interview data consisted of the participants’ experiences deciding on AT/WT procurement. A reflexive inductive thematic analysis was used to identify aspects that influenced decision-making. The main findings show that decision-making is in the making, meaning that decision-making is a constant on-going managerial process. Furthermore, the findings show that managers experience uncertainty in the decision-making, sometimes make ad hoc decisions and request an evidence-based, person-centred approach to improve decision-making. The study concludes that supportive, technology, patient, and knowledge aspects influence managers’ decisions.

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  • 5.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Falun, Sweden.
    Alam, Moudud
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Informat & Engn, Falun, Sweden.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Falun, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Experiences of Assistive Products and Home Care among Older Clients with and without Dementia in Sweden2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 19, p. 12350-12350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to compare selection, use and outcomes of assistive products among older home care clients with and without dementia in Sweden, and to explore the relations between the use of assistive products and perceptions of home care, loneliness and safety. Self-reported data from 89,811 home care clients aged 65 years or more, of whom 8.9% had dementia, were analysed using regression models. Excluding spectacles, 88.2% of them used assistive products. Respondents without dementia were more likely to use at least one assistive product but less likely to use assistive products for remembering. Respondents with dementia participated less in the selection of assistive products, used less assistive products, and benefited less from them. Users of assistive products were more likely to be anxious and bothered by loneliness, to feel unsafe at home with home care, to experience that their opinions and wishes regarding assistance were disregarded by home care personnel, and to be treated worse by home care personnel. The findings raise concerns about whether the needs for assistive products among home care clients with dementia are adequately provided for. They also indicate a need to strengthen a person-centred approach to providing home care to users of assistive products.

  • 6.
    Buli, Benti Geleta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Tillander, Annika
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Fell, Terence
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Bälter, Katarina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Active Commuting and Healthy Behavior among Adolescents in Neighborhoods with Varying Socioeconomic Status: The NESLA Study2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 7, article id 3784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (1) Background: The World Health Organization recommends active commuting as a source of physical activity. Active commuting is determined by various factors, including the socioeconomic status (SES) of families and neighborhoods, distance to schools, perceived neighborhood safety, lifestyles, and availability of walkways and biking paths. This study aimed to assess factors associated with modes of transportation to and from school among adolescents aged 16–19 living in a middle-sized city in Sweden. (2) Method: Three hundred and fourteen students, of whom 55% were females, from schools in the city of Västerås participated in the study. Printed as well as web-based self-administered questionnaires were used to collect the data. (3) Results: Adolescents living in high SES neighborhoods were 80% more likely to bike or walk to school (OR = 1.80; CI: 1.01, 3.20) than adolescents living in low SES neighborhoods. Furthermore, active commuting was associated with higher consumption of fruits and vegetables (OR = 1.77; CI: 1.05, 2.97) and less consumption of junk foods (OR = 0.43; CI: 0.26, 0.71), as compared to passive commuting. (4) Conclusions: Active commuting is a cost-effective and sustainable source of regular physical activity and should be encouraged at a societal level. 

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  • 7.
    Bälter, O.
    et al.
    Department of Media Technology and Interaction Design, KTH—Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedin, B.
    Department of Media Technology and Interaction Design, KTH—Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Department of Media Technology and Interaction Design, KTH—Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Walking outdoors during seminars improved perceived seminar quality and sense of well-being among participants2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are a growing health problem globally. Physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of numerous ailments, cardiovascular disease and mortality. Our primary aim was to perform a feasibility study on how to incorporate physical activity among students and teachers in regular teaching activities. The second aim was to investigate how students and teachers perceived the differences between outdoor walking seminars and regular indoor seminars. By transforming an on-campus course into a blended course, we were able to conduct seminars outdoors in nearby nature while walking. These walking seminars were evaluated among 131 students and nine teachers leading the walking seminars. The responses to the student survey and teacher interviews indicate that discussions, sense of well-being and the general quality of the seminar improved, regardless of how physically active participants were the rest of the time. The study shows one way to increase physical activity with small means; in our case, a reorganization of how we prepared for the seminars which allowed for walking discussions.

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  • 8.
    Comasco, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Todkar, Aniruddha
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Granholm, Linnea
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharmaceut Biosci, Neuropharmacol Addict & Behav Grp, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Kent W.
    Vasteras Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, S-72189 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Nylander, Ingrid
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharmaceut Biosci, Neuropharmacol Addict & Behav Grp, S-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Alpha 2a-Adrenoceptor Gene Expression and Early Life Stress-Mediated Propensity to Alcohol Drinking in Outbred Rats2015In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 7154-7171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stressful events early in life, later high alcohol consumption and vulnerability to alcohol use disorder (AUD) are tightly linked. Norepinephrine is highly involved in the stress response and the alpha 2A-adrenoceptor, which is an important regulator of norepinephrine signalling, is a putative target in pharmacotherapy of AUD. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of early-life stress and adult voluntary alcohol drinking on the alpha 2A-adrenoceptor. The relative expression and promoter DNA methylation of the Adra2a gene were measured in the hypothalamus, a key brain region in stress regulation. A well-characterized animal model of early-life stress was used in combination with an episodic voluntary drinking in adulthood. Alcohol drinking rats with a history of early-life stress had lower Adra2a expression than drinking rats not exposed to stress. Alcohol intake and Adra2a gene expression were negatively correlated in high-drinking animals, which were predominantly rats subjected to early-life stress. The results provide support for a link between early-life stress, susceptibility for high alcohol consumption, and low Adra2a expression in the hypothalamus. These findings can increase our understanding of the neurobiological basis for vulnerability to initiate risk alcohol consumption and individual differences in the response to 2A-adrenoceptor agonists.

  • 9.
    Ehn, Maria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Revenäs, Åsa
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Region Västmanland.
    Technology-Based Motivation Support for Seniors' Physical Activity-A Qualitative Study on Seniors' and Health Care Professionals' Views2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates seniors' and health care professionals' (HCPs) perceptions on needed contributions and qualities of digital technology-based motivation support for seniors' physical activity (PA). Seniors and HCPs expressed their views in focus groups, which were analyzed separately by inductive content analysis. Similarities and differences in seniors' and HCPs' views were identified through thematic analysis of qualitative results from both focus groups. This article's main findings are that both seniors and HCPs believed digital technology should support and make PA more enjoyable in ways to strengthen seniors' control and well-being. However, seniors emphasized support for social interaction, while HCPs also requested support for increasing seniors' insight into PA and for facilitating their dialogue with seniors. Conclusions to be drawn are that seniors and HPCs shared overall views on digital technology's main contributions but had different perspectives on how those contributions could be obtained. This highlights the importance of the early identification of user groups and exploration of their different needs when developing new solutions. Moreover, seniors' and HCPs' perceptions included aspects relevant for personal motivation, technology acceptance, and PA behavioral change according to self-determination theory, unified theory of acceptance and use of technology, and behavioral change techniques for increasing PA.

  • 10.
    Elvén, Maria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stier, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Hellström, Charlotta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Dahlen, M.
    Department of Marketing and Strategy, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Daniel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior before and during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Swedish Population Study2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 5, article id 2558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments have enforced measures to limit the spread of COVID-19 with varying degrees of success, which could affect people’s physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior. This study aimed to examine changes in PA levels, types of PA, and sedentary behavior in the Swedish population before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Associations between changed PA levels and demographical and behavioral determinants were also investigated. In December 2020, 1035 individuals (18–79 years old) completed a survey about their PA and sedentary behavior before and during the pandemic. Factors influencing their PA were also explored. Fifty-one percent of the sample reported reduced total PA, 18% had no change, and 31% increased their PA. Overall, organized PA decreased the most and sedentary behavior increased. The youngest and oldest age groups reported the greatest reduction in PA, while middle-aged groups reported the most increased PA. Men reported a larger increase in sedentary behavior than women. Mental and physical capability was associated with change in PA. In conclusion, this study indicates that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the majority of the Swedish population have decreased PA levels with a concurrent increase in sedentary behavior, which may have negative health consequences. Interventions are recommended to address both PA and sedentary behavior, specifically to strengthen people’s ability to perform PA and focusing on the youngest and oldest age groups. 

  • 11.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Imms, Christine
    Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    King, Gillian
    Bloorview Research Institute, Torornto, Canada.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; CHILD, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brooks, Rob
    School of Clinical and Applied Sciences, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gothilander, Jennifer
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Definitions and operationalization of mental health problems, wellbeing and participation constructs in children with ndd: Distinctions and clarifications2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1-19, article id 1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with impairments are known to experience more restricted participation than other children. It also appears that low levels of participation are related to a higher prevalence of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). The purpose of this conceptual paper is to describe and define the constructs mental health problems, mental health, and participation to ensure that future research investigating participation as a means to mental health in children and adolescents with NDD is founded on conceptual clarity. We first discuss the difference between two aspects of mental health problems, namely mental disorder and mental illness. This discussion serves to highlight three areas of conceptual difficulty and their consequences for understanding the mental health of children with NDD that we then consider in the article: (1) how to define mental health problems, (2) how to define and assess mental health problems and mental health, i.e., wellbeing as separate constructs, and (3) how to describe the relationship between participation and wellbeing. We then discuss the implications of our propositions for measurement and the use of participation interventions as a means to enhance mental health (defined as wellbeing). Conclusions: Mental disorders include both diagnoses related to impairments in the developmental period, i.e., NDD and diagnoses related to mental illness. These two types of mental disorders must be separated. Children with NDD, just like other people, may exhibit aspects of both mental health problems and wellbeing simultaneously. Measures of wellbeing defined as a continuum from flourishing to languishing for children with NDD need to be designed and evaluated. Wellbeing can lead to further participation and act to protect from mental health problems. 

  • 12.
    Johansson, Marcus F.
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    McKee, Kevin J.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Summer Meranius, Martina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Williams, Christine L.
    Christine E Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, United States.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. School of Health and Welfare, Dalarna University, Falun, 791 88, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Alfred Nobels Allé 23, Huddinge, 141 52, Sweden.
    Negative Impact and Positive Value of Caregiving in Spouse Carers of Persons with Dementia in Sweden2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 3, article id 1788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (1) Background: Spouse carers of persons with dementia (PwD) are particularly vulnerable to negative outcomes of care, yet research rarely focuses on their caregiving situation. This study explores factors associated with the positive value and negative impact of caregiving in spouse car-ers of PwD in Sweden. (2) Methods: The study was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey, with a convenience sample of spouse carers of PwD (n = 163). The questionnaire addressed: care situation, carer stress, health and social well-being, relationship quality and quality of support, and contained measures of positive value and negative impact of caregiving. (3) Results: Hierarchical regression models explained 63.4% variance in positive value and 63.2% variance in negative impact of caregiving. Three variables were significant in the model of positive value: mutuality, change in emotional closeness following dementia and quality of support. Six variables were significant in the model of negative impact: years in relationship, years as carer, behavioural stress, self-rated health, emotional loneliness and change in physical intimacy following dementia. (4) Conclusions: Support to spouse carers of PwD should address the carer–care-recipient relationship quality, although different aspects of the relationship should be addressed if both the positive value of caregiving is to be enhanced and the negative impact reduced. 

  • 13.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, 722 20 Västerås, Sweden.
    Herlofson, Jorgen
    Empatica AB, 752 20 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wiklund, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Department of Health and Care Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Campus Narvik, 8514 Narvik, Norway.
    Study Circles as a Possible Arena to Support Self-Care—A Swedish Pilot Study2024In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 21, no 4, article id 483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, issues related to people’s mental health and well-being have been described as a challenge for society, globally as well as in Sweden. This calls for new approaches to mental health promotion. The aim was to evaluate the adequacy of its content and structure, describing experiences of study circles as a means of supporting participants’ self-care and self-compassion. The overall design is a descriptive QUAL + quan design, where the quantitative and qualitative results are integrated. Five participants participated in a focus group interview, of whom four completed questionnaires. One individual interview was conducted with the study circle leader. Study circles can be an arena for mental health promotion, as learning and sharing of experience contributes to a sense of coherence, as well as self-compassion and a genuine concern for one’s own and others’ well-being, but are not considered an alternative to psychiatric care for those in need of professional services. Study circles can be a possible means to support self-care and thereby promote mental health in the general population and are a valuable contribution to public health. However, in addition to modifications of the content, further research is needed on the qualifications for study circle leaders, as well as the dissemination of study circles.

  • 14.
    King, Abby C.
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Odunitan-Wayas, Feyisayo A.
    University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7725, South Africa.
    Chaudhury, Moushumi
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 92006, New Zealand.
    Rubio, Maria Alejandra
    Universidad de los Andes, 111711 Bogotá, Colombia.
    Baiocchi, Michael
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy
    University of Southern Queensland, Ipswich, QLD 4305, Australia.
    Montes, Felipe
    Universidad de los Andes, 111711 Bogotá, Colombia.
    Banchoff, Ann
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Sarmiento, Olga Lucia
    Universidad de los Andes, 111711 Bogotá, Colombia.
    Bälter, Katarina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Hinckson, Erica
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 92006, New Zealand.
    Chastin, Sebastien
    Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA, UK.
    Lambert, Estelle V.
    University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7725, South Africa.
    González, Silvia A.
    Universidad de los Andes, 111711 Bogotá, Colombia.
    Guerra, Ana María
    Universidad de los Andes, 111711 Bogotá, Colombia.
    Gelius, Peter
    Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Zha, Caroline
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Sarabu, Chethan
    Gardner Packard Children’s Health Center, Atherton, CA 94027, US.
    Kakar, Pooja A.
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Fernes, Praveena
    University of London, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0XG, UK.
    Rosas, Lisa G.
    University of London, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0XG, UK.
    Winter, Sandra J.
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    McClain, Elizabeth
    Arkansas Colleges of Health Education, Fort Smith, AR 72901, USA.
    Gardiner, Paul A.
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia.
    Community-Based Approaches to Reducing Health Inequities and Fostering Environmental Justice through Global Youth-Engaged Citizen Science2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 8, no 3, article id 892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing socioeconomic and structural disparities within and between nations have created unprecedented health inequities that have been felt most keenly among the world’s youth. While policy approaches can help to mitigate such inequities, they are often challenging to enact in under-resourced and marginalized communities. Community-engaged participatory action research provides an alternative or complementary means for addressing the physical and social environmental contexts that can impact health inequities. The purpose of this article is to describe the application of a particular form of technology-enabled participatory action research, called the Our Voice citizen science research model, with youth. An overview of 20 Our Voice studies occurring across five continents indicates that youth and young adults from varied backgrounds and with interests in diverse issues affecting their communities can participate successfully in multiple contributory research processes, including those representing the full scientific endeavor. These activities can, in turn, lead to changes in physical and social environments of relevance to health, wellbeing, and, at times, climate stabilization. The article ends with future directions for the advancement of this type of community-engaged citizen science among young people across the socioeconomic spectrum.

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  • 15.
    Lindberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Elvén, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Nilsson, Kent W.
    Center for Clinical Research, Central Hospital of Västerås, Uppsala University, SE-75236 Uppsala, Sweden;Division of Public Health Sciences, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, SE-72134 Västerås, Sweden.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stier, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Dahlen, Micael
    Department of Marketing and Strategy, Stockholm School of Economics, SE-11383 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    How Have Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior, Changed during the COVID-19 Pandemic? A Swedish Repeated Cross-Sectional Design Study2023In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 3642-3642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) affect people’s physical and mental health. The aim was to examine changes in PA and SB in a Swedish population: at three time points: 2019, 2020, and 2022, i.e., before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Pre-pandemic PA and SB, i.e., 2019, were assessed retrospectively in 2020. Associations between PA and SB with sex, age, occupation, COVID-19 history, weight change, health, and life satisfaction were also examined. The design was repeated cross-sectionally. The main findings demonstrate the PA levels decreased between 2019 and 2020, and between 2019 and 2022, but not between 2020 and 2022. The SB increase was most evident between 2019 and 2020. Between 2020 and 2022, results showed a decrease in SB, but SB did not reach pre-pandemic levels. Both sexes decreased their PA over time. Although men reported more PA sex, they did not have any association with PA changes. Two age groups, 19–29 years and 65–79 years, decreased their PA over time. Both PA and SB were associated with COVID-19, occupation, age, life satisfaction, health, and weight change. This study underlines the importance of monitoring changes in PA and SB as they have relevance for health and well-being. There is a risk that the levels of PA and SB do not return to pre-pandemic levels in the population.

  • 16.
    Lygum, V. L.
    et al.
    Department of the Built Environment, The Faculty of Engineering and Science, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, 2450, Denmark.
    Dupret, K.
    Research Centre for Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainability, Department of People and Technology, Roskilde University, Roskilde, 4000, Denmark.
    Bentsen, P.
    Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Copenhagen University Hospital-Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Frederiksberg, 2000, Denmark.
    Djernis, D.
    The Foundation for Mental Health, Valby, 2500, Denmark.
    Grangaard, S.
    Department of the Built Environment, The Faculty of Engineering and Science, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, 2450, Denmark.
    Ladegaard, Y.
    The Foundation for Mental Health, Valby, 2500, Denmark.
    Petersson Troije, Charlotte
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Department of Urban Studies, The Faculty of Culture and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, 20506, Sweden.
    Greenspace as Workplace: Benefits, Challenges and Essentialities in the Physical Environment2023In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 17, article id 6689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a scarcity of knowledge regarding the potential benefits of human–nature contact within the context of working life. Even more limited is the research that focuses on working outdoors and the setting in which it takes place. This study aimed to obtain insight into key aspects of the physical environment relevant for the experienced benefits and challenges of workers exploring office work outdoors. We conducted interviews with key informants as well as photo registration and mapping of the different green spaces in the environments of six small or medium-sized workplaces. The information gathered was used as background knowledge for exploratory qualitative interviews, which were conducted while walking in natural settings chosen by the interviewees. With a landscape architectural perspective and an inductive approach, we explored employees’ experiences of bringing office work outdoors. The following themes emerged: ‘Simplicity,’ ‘Safeness’, ‘Comfort’, and ‘Contact with Nature’ were experienced as key aspects in relation to the physical environment, whereas ‘Sociality’, ‘Well-being’, and ‘Functioning’ stood out as the main benefits and, ‘Digital dependency’ and ‘Illegitimacy’ as challenges to overcome. Based on the identification of potential benefits and their prerequisites, we propose implications for practice and research that can be useful when focusing on bringing office work outdoors. 

  • 17.
    Mensah, Aziz
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Bielefeld Univ, Bielefeld Grad Sch Hist & Sociol BGHS, Bielefeld, Germany..
    Job Stress and Mental Well-Being among Working Men and Women in Europe: The Mediating Role of Social Support2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 5, article id 2494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Job stress is one of the most common health issues in many organizations, particularly among women. Moreover, an increase in job stress with low social support may have an adverse effect on mental well-being. This study investigated the mediating role of social support in the relationship between job stress and mental well-being among working men and women in Europe. A cross sectional data set from the 2015 6th European Working Conditions Survey on 14,603 men and 15,486 women from 35 countries in Europe was analyzed. The study applied Hayes process macro 4 modelling technique to estimate the direct, indirect, and total effects of job stress on mental well-being among working adults. The study further used the Hayes process macro 59 model to estimate the gender difference in the mediating effect. The results showed that job stress had a direct negative effect on mental well-being among workers in Europe (beta=-0.2352,p<0.05). However, there were significant gender differences in the relationship (beta=-0.3729,p<0.05), with women having higher effect size than men (men: beta=-3.9129,p<0.05 vs. women: beta=-4.2858,p<0.05). Furthermore, the indirect effect showed that social support mediated the relationship of job stress on mental well-being (beta=-0.0181, CI: -0.0212-0.0153). Nevertheless, the mediating effect of social support did not differ among men and women. This study provides evidence that job stress has a negative impact on mental well-being among working adults, and social support mediates this relationship. The results highlight the importance of the role of support from colleagues and supervisors at the work place, which may help reduce job stress, and improve mental well-being. Sociological and occupational health researchers should not ignore the role of gender when studying work environment and jobs in general.

  • 18.
    Nordgren, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Elvén, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    The Mediating Role of Healthy Lifestyle Behaviours on the Association between Perceived Stress and Self-Rated Health in People with Non-Communicable Disease2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 19, article id 12071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perceived stress can affect people's lifestyle behaviours and self-rated health. A balanced, healthy lifestyle can alleviate experiences of stress. For clinicians to use evidence-based and theory-based knowledge in health dialogues with people with non-communicable diseases, and in order to develop more effective behavioural counselling, more knowledge is needed. Hence, this study aimed to examine the mediating role of sedentary behaviour, daily physical activity, physical exercise, and dietary habits on the association between perceived stress and self-rated health in people with or without one to four self-reported non-communicable diseases (myocardial infarction, stroke, hypertension, diabetes). The study used a cross-sectional design. Responses from in total 10,583 individuals were collected in 2016 and 2019 by a self-report questionnaire. A series of simple and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the mediating effects of healthy lifestyle behaviours on the association between perceived stress and self-rated health. The results show that the investigated healthy lifestyle behaviours partly mediated the association between perceived stress and self-rated health in people with no diagnosis, and in people with one or two diagnoses. It can be concluded that healthy lifestyle behaviours could probably be targeted in relation to the number of noncommunicable diseases that the individuals have.

  • 19.
    Nyberg, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, P.O. Box 564, SE-751 22 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Peristera, Paraskevi
    Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institutet, SE-113 65 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Does Exposure to High Job Demands, Low Decision Authority, or Workplace Violence Mediate the Association between Employment in the Health and Social Care Industry and Register-Based Sickness Absence? A Longitudinal Study of a Swedish Cohort2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this paper was to investigate if job demands, decision authority, and workplace violence mediate the association between employment in the health and social care industry and register-based sickness absence. Methods: Participants from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health who responded to questionnaires in 2006–2016 (n = 3951) were included. Multilevel autoregressive cross-lagged mediation models were fitted to the data. Employment in the health and social care industry at one time point was used as the predictor variable and register-based sickness absence >14 days as the outcome variable. Self-reported levels of job demands, decision authority, and exposure to workplace violence from the first time point were used as mediating variables. Results: The direct path between employment in the health and social care industry and sickness absence >14 days was, while adjusting for the reverse path, 0.032, p = 0.002. The indirect effect mediated by low decision authority was 0.002, p = 0.006 and the one mediated by exposure to workplace violence was 0.008, p = 0.002. High job demands were not found to mediate the association. Conclusion: Workplace violence and low decision authority may, to a small extent, mediate the association between employment in the health and social care industry and sickness absence. 

  • 20.
    Richter, A.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roczniewska, M.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sopot, 81 745, Poland.
    Loeb, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stempel, C. R.
    FernUniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.
    Rigotti, T.
    Leibniz Institute for Resilience Research, Mainz, Germany.
    The cross‐level moderation effect of resource‐providing leadership on the demands—work ability relationship2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 17, article id 9084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employees in female‐dominated sectors are exposed to high workloads, emotional job demands, and role ambiguity, and often have insufficient resources to deal with these demands. This imbalance causes strain, threatening employees’ work ability. The aim of this study was to examine whether resource‐providing leadership at the workplace level buffers against the negative repercussions of these job demands on work ability. Employees (N = 2383) from 290 work groups across three countries (Germany, Finland, and Sweden) in female‐dominated sectors were asked to complete questionnaires in this study. Employees rated their immediate supervisor’s resourceproviding leadership and also self‐reported their work ability, role ambiguity, workload, and emotional demands. Multilevel modeling was performed to predict individual work ability with job demands as employee‐level predictors, and leadership as a group‐level predictor. Work ability was poor when employees reported high workloads, high role ambiguity, and high emotional demands. Resource‐providing leadership at the group level had a positive impact on employees’ work ability. We observed a cross‐level interaction between emotional demands and resource‐providing leadership. We conclude that resource‐providing leadership buffers against the repercussions of emotional demands for the work ability of employees in female‐dominated sectors; however, it is not influential in dealing with workload or role ambiguity.

  • 21.
    Roczniewska, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Richter, A.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasson, H.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predicting sustainable employability in swedish healthcare: The complexity of social job resources2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 4, article id 1200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving sustainable employability (SE), i.e., when employees are able to continue working in a productive, satisfactory, and healthy manner, is a timely challenge for healthcare. Because healthcare is a female-dominated sector, our paper investigated the role of social job resources in promoting SE. To better illustrate the complexity of the organizational environment, we incorporated resources that operate at different levels (individual, group) and in different planes (horizontal, vertical): trust (individual-vertical), teamwork (group-horizontal), and transformational leadership (group-vertical). Based on the job demands-resources model, we predicted that these resources initiate the motivational process and thus promote SE. To test these predictions, we conducted a 3-wave study in 42 units of a healthcare organization in Sweden. The final study sample consisted of 269 professionals. The results of the multilevel analyses demonstrated that, at the individual level, vertical trust was positively related to all three facets of SE. Next, at the group level, teamwork had a positive link with employee health and productivity, while transformational leadership was negatively related to productivity. These findings underline the importance of acknowledging the levels and planes at which social job resources operate to more accurately capture the complexity of organizational phenomena and to design interventions that target the right level of the environment.

  • 22.
    Roczniewska, Marta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Med Mangement Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;SWPS Univ Social Sci & Humanities, Inst Psychol, PL-03815 Warsaw, Poland..
    Rundgren, Emma Hedberg
    Karolinska Inst, Med Mangement Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hasson, Henna
    Karolinska Inst, Med Mangement Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Ctr Epidemiol & Community Med, S-10431 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bakker, Arnold B.
    Erasmus Univ, Ctr Excellence Posit Org Psychol, NL-3000 DR Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Johannesburg, Dept Ind Psychol & People Management, ZA-2006 Johannesburg, South Africa..
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Karolinska Inst, Med Mangement Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    How Should Job Crafting Interventions Be Implemented to Make Their Effects Last?: Protocol for a Group Concept Mapping Study2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 21, article id 13922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: By means of job crafting (JC) employees shape and customize their job design to align it with their preferences. Research has so far shown that such bottom-up proactivity can be stimulated via JC interventions. While the overall effectiveness behind these interventions has been supported, it is unclear how to implement these interventions to make their effects lasting. Methods: The overall aim of this project will be to investigate how to implement JC interventions with lasting effects. We will apply a group concept mapping (GCM) methodology, which is a mixed methods approach of exploratory nature for engaging stakeholder groups in a structured conceptualization process. As part of concept mapping procedures, brainstorming sessions will be conducted with experts in job crafting to identify factors expected to make job crafting intervention effects lasting. These factors will be sorted by similarity and rated by each participant in regard to their perceived importance and feasibility to ensure lasting, sustainable effects. The data will be analyzed using multidimensional scaling (MDS), hierarchical cluster analysis, and descriptive and inferential statistics, resulting in a visual representation of conceptually distinguished clusters representing the factors influencing the sustainability of JC interventions. In the final step, a workshop will be conducted with the participants to facilitate the interpretation of the results. Results and conclusion: This study will provide knowledge relevant to organizational practitioners and scholars who want to implement JC interventions with lasting effects. Although data collected following the group concept mapping procedure is self-reported and at risk of being simplified, the method allows for a structured conceptualization process integrating different perspectives and uncovering implicit knowledge making it suitable for studying complex phenomena. The results will not only enrich the current literature concerning the effectiveness of JC interventions but also be used to develop a practitioner-oriented toolkit outlining evidence-based recommendations concerning designing and implementing, as well as evaluating JC interventions.

  • 23.
    Steinhardt, F.
    et al.
    Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Jahnsen, R.
    Beitostølen Healthsports Center, Norway; Research Center of Habilitation and Rehabilitation Models and Services, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Dolva, A. -S
    Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Beitostølen Healthsports Center, Norway.
    Testing ActiveYou II: Applying Cognitive Interviews in Improving Item Quality and Applicability of a Web-Based, Self-Report Instrument on Participation in Children with Disabilities2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Children and youth with disabilities participate less in leisure activities than their nondisabled peers. Increasing participation is a primary goal of rehabilitation interventions. However, valid measures that include the individual's perspectives and facilitating and hindering factors for participation are lacking in the Norwegian setting. In this study, ActiveYou II, a self-report, web-based instrument under development, was tested to obtain item quality and applicability. METHODS: Nine children with disabilities participated in cognitive interviews, testing a first set of ActiveYou II items. The verbal probe method for cognitive interviews was applied. RESULTS: The children's comprehension and responses through cognitive interviews improved the applicability and item quality of ActiveYou II. Item adjustments were made to the wording of the questions and response alternatives, and the number of response alternatives were decreased where appropriate. CONCLUSIONS: The use of cognitive interviews with children before performing further psychometric testing has been very useful in the development process of ActiveYou II. Adjustments of the questions and response alternatives were made accordingly.

  • 24.
    Zander, Viktoria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Röda korsets högskola, Sweden.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Development of an Interview Guide Identifying the Rehabilitation Needs of Women from the Middle East Living with Chronic Pain2015In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 12043-12056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to develop an interview guide for use by primaryhealthcare professionals to support them in identifying the rehabilitation needs of forcedresettled women from the Middle East living with chronic pain. Previous findings togetherwith the existing literature were used as the basis for developing the interview guide in threesteps: item generation, cognitive interviews, and a pilot study. The study resulted in a16-item interview guide focusing on patients’ concerns and expectations, with considerationof pre-migration, migration, and post-migration factors that might affect their health. Withthe help of the guide, patients were also invited to identify difficulties in their daily activitiesand to take part in setting goals and planning their rehabilitation. The current interview guideprovides professional guidance to caretakers, taking a person-centered participative point ofdeparture when meeting and planning care, for and together, with representatives from dispersed ethnic populations in Sweden. It can be used together with the patient by all staffmembers working in primary healthcare, with the aim of contributing to continuity of careand multi-professional collaboration.

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