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  • 1.
    Appelgren Engström, Heléne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Borneskog, Catrin
    Northumbria Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Falun, Sweden..
    Loeb, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Associations between heteronormative information, parental support and stress among same-sex mothers in Sweden-A web survey2021In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate same-sex mothers' self-assessed experiences of forming a family, and the association between heteronormative information, parental support and parenting stress. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional study. Methods: In a web survey conducted in Sweden in 2019, same-sex mothers (N = 146) with a child aged 1-3 years answered questions about their experiences of forming a family through assisted reproduction and questions about parenting stress. Descriptive statistics describes the process of forming a family. Pearson's correlation analyses and independent sample t tests were used to test hypotheses about heteronormative information, parental support and parenting stress. Results: Same-sex mothers experienced going through assisted reproduction treatment as stressful, and parental groups as not being supportive. Heteronormative information correlated with both lower perceived parental support and higher perceived parenting stress. Non-birth mothers experienced less acknowledgement and support than birthmothers.

  • 2.
    Aryuwat, Pimwalunn
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lövenmark [Åberg] [Engström], Annica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Radabutr, Matanee
    Praboromarajchanok Institute, Boromarajonani College of Nursing Changwat Nonthaburi The Ministry of Public Health Nonthaburi Thailand.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    An integrative review of resilience among nursing students in the context of nursing education2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This integrative review aimed to examine empirical research on resilience among nursing students in the context of nursing education. Resilience helps nursing students handle challenges, such as changing learning styles and experiencing their first clinical practice.DesignAn integrative review.MethodsThe search terms focused on resilience and health in nursing students and nursing education. The database used in this review were CINAHL Plus, PubMed and MEDLINE. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool appraised the studies' quality.

    ResultsThis study explored 52 records and revealed three current research focuses related to nursing students' resilience: (1) the concept and description of resilience, (2) the characteristics affecting resilience and (3) the mediating role of resilience in maintaining holistic health. Recommendations include adding a resilience topic to the nursing curriculum, providing resilience enhancement programs, examining the relationship between resilience and holistic health and exploring the influence of resilience about global health crises.

    Public Contribution Resilience among nursing students plays a vital role in helping them to overcome adversities during their nursing education. Additionally, after graduation, nursing students can continue contributing to society as resilient Registered Nurses in the future.

  • 3.
    Carnesten, Hillewi
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wiklund, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Hlth & Care Sci, Narvik, Norway.
    Skoglund, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Battling extraordinary situations and conflicting emotions: A qualitative study of being a newly graduated Registered Nurse in the emergency department during the COVID-19 pandemic2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 2370-2380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe newly graduated registered nurses' (NGRNs') experiences of encountering stress in emergency departments (EDs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design: A qualitative descriptive study. Methods: Data from 14 in-depth interviews with NGRNs working in an ED for 3-36 months after graduation was analysed by the means of qualitative content analysis as described by Graneheim and Lundman. Interviews were conducted from March to November 2020 covering the first two waves of the pandemic. Results: Data revealed three categories and nine subcategories comprised in the theme Battling extraordinary situations and conflicting emotions. Empowered by acknowledging themselves as important caregivers during the pandemic NGRNs struggle against limitations and exert themselves beyond their known limit. External stressors due to work overload in combination with understaffing force NGRNs into the role of the experienced nurse prematurely and internal stressors derives from part taking in less qualitative care.

  • 4.
    Danielsson, Lena
    et al.
    Vastmanlands Sjukhus, Reg Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Lundstrom, Marie-Louise
    Vastmanlands Sjukhus, Reg Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Anaesthetizing children-From a nurse anaesthetist's perspective-A qualitative study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 393-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe nurse anaesthetists' experiences of encountering and caring for children in connection to anaesthesia. Design: Qualitative design. Methods: Sixteen written narratives based on eight nurse anaesthetists' experiences of meeting children was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The overarching theme was: "anaesthetizing children is a complex caring situation, including interactions with the child and parents as well as ensuring patient safety, affected by the perioperative team and organizational prerequisites". The nurses stated that in their interaction with the family, their goal was to ensure that children and parents felt secure and calm. "Striving to work in confidence" underlined the team and organizational influences. Encountering children involves more than knowledge about technical equipment, procedures and drugs. Knowledge about children's development and fears and parents' needs are essential for an optimal caring situation. Organizations need to realize that extra time, skills and resources are needed to safely anaesthetize children.

  • 5.
    Golsäter, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Karlsson Fialoss, Maria
    Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Olsson Vestvik, Sølvi
    Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Anefur, Hilda
    Pediatric Outpatient Clinicy, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Harder, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. ChiP‐Research Group, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare Mälardalen University Västerås Sweden.
    Child health care nurses' cultural competence in health visits with children of foreign background2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate child health care nurses' cultural competence in health visits with children and their families of foreign background. Design: A cross-sectional design combined with a qualitative explorative design. Methods: The nurses assessed their cultural competence using a modified version of the Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire. Interviews were used to obtain a detailed description of the nurses' cultural competence. Results: The nurses assessed themselves as rather culturally competent. They scored above mid-score in the total score for cultural competence and on all subscales. Education in cultural diversity at the nurses' workplace had the highest association to cultural competence. The nurses described their awareness as recognizing each child and her/his family rather than their cultural background, and viewing the child as a unique part of her/his cultural context. Despite their high scores on cultural competence, the nurses described a lack of cultural knowledge and explained their need of further knowledge.

  • 6.
    Hemberg, Jessica
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi, Vasa, Finland.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Caring from the heart as belonging: The basis for mediating compassion2020In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 660-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Informal coercion, that is, situations where caregivers use subtle coercive measures to impose their will on patients, is common in adult psychiatric inpatient care. It has been described as ‘a necessary evil’, confronting nurses with an ethical dilemma where they need to balance between a wish to do good, and the risk of violating patients’ dignity and autonomy.

    Aim:

    To describe nurses’ experiences of being involved in informal coercion in adult psychiatric inpatient care.

    Research design:

    The study has a qualitative, inductive design.

    Participants and research context:

    Semi-structured interviews with 10 Swedish psychiatric nurses were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Ethical considerations:

    The study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. In line with the Swedish Ethical Review Act, it was also subject to ethical procedures at the university.

    Findings:

    Four domains comprise informal coercion as a process over time. These domains contain 11 categories focusing on different experiences involved in the process: Striving to connect, involving others, adjusting to the caring culture, dealing with laws, justifying coercion, waiting for the patient, persuading the patient, negotiating with the patient, using professional power, scrutinizing one’s actions and learning together.

    Discussion:

    Informal coercion is associated with moral stress as nurses might find themselves torn between a wish to do good for the patient, general practices and ‘house rules’ in the caring culture. In addition, nurses need to be aware of the asymmetry of the caring relationship, in order to avoid compliance becoming a consequence of patients subordinating to nurse power, rather than a result of mutual understanding. Reflections are thus necessary through the process to promote mutual learning and to avoid violations of patients’ dignity and autonomy.

    Conclusion:

    If there is a need for coercion, that is, if the coercion is found to be an ‘unpleasant good’, rather than ‘necessary evil’ considering the consequences for the patient, it should be subject to reflecting and learning together with the patient

  • 7.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    Saaristo, Panu
    The International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), Geneva, Switzerland.
    von Strauss, Eva
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    Nurses’ experiences of health concerns, teamwork, leadership and knowledge transfer during an Ebola outbreak in West Africa2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 824-833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Håkansson Eklund, Jakob
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Ollén Lindqvist, Anna
    Mälardalen University.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hochwälder, Jacek
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Empathy levels among nursing students: A comparative cross-sectional study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 983-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Empathy is a crucial component of the nurse–patient relationship, but knowledge is lacking as to when empathy develops during nursing education. The aim of the present study was to compare empathy levels at different stages of undergraduate nursing education and different master's nursing programmes. Design: The design was a comparative cross-sectional study. Methods: A total of 329 participants in Sweden, comprised of nursing students in their second and sixth semesters in an undergraduate nursing programme as well as master's nursing students, rated their own empathy using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy. Results: Students in their sixth semester in an undergraduate nursing programme expressed more empathy than did students in their second semester and master's nursing students. Among the five master's programmes, public-health nursing students expressed the most empathy and intensive-care nursing students the least. 

  • 9.
    Lannerstrom, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Holmström, Inger
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    The effect of a short educational intervention in social insurance medicine: A randomized controlled trial2020In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 523-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To evaluate the effect of an educational intervention in social insurance medicine with Registered Nurses. Design Randomized controlled trial. Methods The trial was performed in 20 primary healthcare centres in Central Sweden. The centres were randomly assigned as intervention or control. All Registered Nurses working with telephone nursing at the centres were invited (N = 114); out of these 100 agreed to participate and responded to a questionnaire at the beginning and end of the trial. Fourteen questions in the questionnaire dealt with professional background and were used as exposure variables and were analysed using nominal logistic regression. Results Registered Nurses in the centres randomly assigned for the intervention experienced handling sick leave questions as less problematic after the intervention than those in the control group. This indicated that the intervention was associated with a positive effect. However, due to the rather small study population, the effect was inconclusive.

  • 10.
    Lannerstrom, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Family Med & Prevent Med Sect, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala Univ, Family Med & Prevent Med Sect, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Hlth Serv Res Sect, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Hlth Serv Res Sect, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gaining role clarity in working with sick leave questions-Registered Nurses' experiences of an educational intervention2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe how a short educational intervention in social insurance medicine was experienced by Registered Nurses and what changes it brought to their work with sick leave questions in telephone nursing. Design Qualitative explorative interview study. Methods Interviews with 12 purposively sampled Registered Nurses were conducted and analysed using manifest content analysis. Results The intervention increased Registered Nurses' knowledge of the sick leave process and changed their work habits as they now have more of the skills needed to handle sick leave questions. In this way, they gained role clarity in their work with sick leave questions. The new knowledge included rules and regulations, actors' roles and patients' experiences. Learning from peers, reflecting and having the opportunity to ask questions were also described as increasing their knowledge. The skills following the participation were described as knowing what to say and do and knowing where to turn for support.

  • 11.
    Nordgren, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    An evidence-based structured one-year programme to sustain physical activity in patients with heart failure in primary care: a non-randomized longitudinal feasibility study.2020In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Skogevall, Sofia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Håkansson Eklund, Jakob
    Stockholm university, Sweden.
    Telephone nurses' perceived stress, self-efficacy and empathy in their work with frequent callers.2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 1394-1401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To examine telephone nurses' perceived stress, self-efficacy and empathy in their work with answering calls from frequent callers.

    DESIGN: The study is a quantitative questionnaire survey study with a comparative design.

    METHODS: Telephone nurses (N = 199) answered a survey containing three instruments: Perceived Stress Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale and Jefferson's Scale of Empathy. Correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis and analysis of variance were performed to test the research questions.

    RESULTS: Significant negative correlations were found between stress involving calls from FCs and self-efficacy (r = -.238), and significant negative correlations between stress involving calls from frequent callers and empathy (r = -.185). It was further revealed that telephone nurses who had worked less than 30 years scored higher on Jefferson's Scale of empathy than those who had worked more than 30 years, F(1, 183) = 4.98, η2  = 0.027.

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  • 13.
    Summer Meranius, Martina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Holmström, Inger
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Jakob
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Breitholtz, Agneta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Moniri, Farah
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Skogevall, Sofia
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Skoglund, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Rasoal, Dara
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Paradoxes of person‐centred care: A discussion paper2020In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 1321-1329Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Previous research has mainly focused on the advantages of PCC and less on its disadvantages. Hence, there is a need to further explore the recent research regard-ing PCC from both sides. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to elucidate the advan-tages and disadvantages of PCC.

    DESIGN: Discussion paper.

    METHODS: We searched relevant literature published January 2000–March 2018 in PubMed, Medline, CHINAL, Scopus and Web of Science.

    RESULTS: The results showed that PCC can contribute to improved health and well-being, improved mutual interaction in relationships, improved cost-effectiveness and im-proved work environment, while the disadvantages can involve increased personal and financial costs, exclusion of certain groups, increased personal and financial costs, exclu-sion of staff's personhood and unfairness due to empathy. An analysis of the existing literature on PCC showed paradoxes, which call for further investigation.

  • 14.
    Wahlström, Emmie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Harder, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Larm, Peter
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Golsater, Marie
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, CHILD Res Grp, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Reg Jonkoping Cty, Child Hlth Serv & Futurum, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Reading the signs in health visits-Perspectives of adolescents with migration experiences on encounters with school nurses2024In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e2217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo explore the experiences of health visits within the school health services from the perspective of adolescents with migration experiences.DesignA descriptive qualitative study.MethodsData were collected using focus groups and semi-structured individual interviews with adolescents with migration experiences aged 13-17 years old. Analysis was conducted using reflexive thematic analysis.ResultsThe results described adolescents reading the signs in the guided interaction between them and the school nurses. Reading the signs illustrated the adolescents' continuous interpretation of the interaction with the school nurse, and their decisions on how to respond throughout the health visit. These interpretations influenced the adolescents' shifting willingness to talk about their health and how they adapted to the space of participation provided by the school nurse. The interpretation also influenced their experiences of health visits as focusing on their health without making them feel singled out.ConclusionAlthough individual considerations might be warranted in health visits with adolescents with migration experiences, the results indicate that similarities in intrapersonal communication in various encounters between adolescents and health professionals might be greater than any differences. Healthcare encounters with adolescents with migration experiences might thus need to be conducted with an awareness that adolescents read the signs in the guided interaction and that similarities in this interaction are greater than any differences.

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