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  • 1.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Anbäcken, Els-Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Zander, Viktoria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Elfström, Magnus L.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Working with short-term goal-directed reablement with older adults: strengthened by a collaborative approach2019In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased number of older adults who experience longevity requires increased investment in healthcare services. Short-term goal-directed reablement is expected to strengthen the functional capacity and quality of life of older adults, while homecare hours, and thus municipal expenditures, decrease. Facilitation of successful interprofessional collaboration includes not only enhancing coordination structurally, but also establishing a commitment regarding culture that overcomes professionally differentiated attitudes. Nurses have an obvious role in these multi-professional teams and the study explores some aspects' of working in this type of collaboration. The aim was to illuminate the meaning of working with short-term goal-directed reablement of older adults as experienced by an interprofessional team. Data were collected after an intervention with goal-directed time-limited reablement of older people. Written narratives from an interprofessional team were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Findings identified four major thematic structures that characterized the meaning: 1) Reliable relationship; including the aspects ‘Confidence between the older adult and staff’, ‘A sense of security’ and ‘Continuity’, 2) Empowered participation, including the following aspects: ‘Listen to the older adult’s desires’ and ‘Put the person in control’, 3) Team with a negotiated approach, including the aspects: ‘Closeness’, ‘Same direction and overarching goal’, ‘Learning from interprofessional dialogue’, 4) Time for growth with the aspects ‘Creating harmony’ and ‘Building the older adult’s self-confidence’. The process of reablement seemed strengthened by the collaborative approach of different professions and their combined efforts. The present study argues that teamwork gives confidence both in terms of general knowledge of reablement but also specific confidence in one’s profession.

  • 2.
    Harder, Maria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Andersson, Sara
    Mälardalen University.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Child healthcare nurses’ encounters with parents whose child is overweight2019In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 39, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nurses in the Swedish child healthcare system can make a difference by offering support to parents of children who areoverweight or at risk of becoming so. Still, research concerning these nurses’ clinical practice when encountering parents whosechild is overweight is inadequate. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ clinical practice when encountering parents of anoverweight child. Data were collected through interviews with 10 nurses, and a content analysis approach was used. The nurses’clinical practice is described in relation to Olander’s theory: Individualising actions, Creating a dialogue, Documenting, andFocusing on normality. This study adds knowledge about nurses’ clinical practice in encounters with parents whose child isoverweight. Also, it adds information on how an issue in a specific care situation may contribute to further understanding anduse of an existing theory in caring science.

  • 3.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Avdelningen Vård och Omvårdnad, Sweden.
    Global Nursing: Educating future nurses for tomorrow’s nursing care needs2017In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 172-174Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The world has witnessed the most comprehensive refugee diaspora of modern history. Sweden has been one of the countriesthat has welcomed people and given them refuge. Refugees are in need of quality nursing care that is provided by professionaland knowledgeable registered nurses. However, taking into account this global mobility and the resulting shift in demographiccharacteristics, nurses need to be particularly competent in relation to addressing global issues. The question is, are futurenurses educated with enough relevant knowledge and skills to be able to meet tomorrow’s nursing care needs? The SwedishRed Cross University College (SRCUC) has contributed to the global discourse in several aspects, not least those elementsrelated to the International Red Cross tradition and its basic humanitarian principles. We would like to share the stipulateddefinition that guides our subject profile area: global nursing. To answer the question that first concerned the SRCUC, wepreviously had conducted a traditional undergraduate nursing education that needed to be updated in relation to what is nowhappening globally. By developing and promoting the relevant knowledge and skills in global nursing, we believe that futurenurses will be prepared to accommodate tomorrow’s nursing care needs.

  • 4.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    Kraft, Mia
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    A global nursing framework in the Swedish Red Cross undergraduate nursing program2018In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alongside a globalized world and a demographic shift in Sweden, future nurses must provide globally significant nursing care based on relevant knowledges and skills. To contribute to the global nursing discourse, this article aims to describe the process undertaken in developing and implementing a global nursing approach and curriculum in the Swedish Red Cross undergraduate nursing program. A comprehensive process of educational change was carried out, targeting both faculty and students with various academic activities. The new global-oriented curriculum was evaluated positively by nursing students, and a definition of global nursing was disseminated among educators. Nursing students at the Swedish Red Cross University College are now encouraged to advocate for vulnerable persons in need of healthcare services and to counteract inequalities and social injustice in sustainable ways. It is suggested that a global nursing framework is what is required when educating nurses to meet tomorrow’s nursing care needs.

  • 5.
    Söderbäck, Maja
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Harder, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Ranheim, Albertine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Being in care situations with young children presents ambigious challenges.2015In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 0, no 0, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
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