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  • 1.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Jonas
    Karolinska University Hospital, Functional Area of Emergency Medicine Huddinge, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Lene
    Region Sörmland, Department of Ambulance Service, Katrineholm, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Competency requirements for the assessment of patients with mental illness in somatic emergency care: A modified Delphi study from the nurses’ perspective2020In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 162-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients suffering from mental illness are vulnerable, and they do not always have access to proper emergency care. The aim of this study was to identify competency requirements for the assessment of patients with mental illness by soliciting the views of emergency care nurses. A modified Delphi method comprising four rounds was used. Data were collected in Sweden between October 2018 and March 2019. The data were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics. The panel of experts reached the highest level of consensus regarding basic medical knowledge: the capability to listen and show respect to the patient are essential competency requirements when assessing patients with mental illness in emergency care. Awareness of these competency requirements will enhance teaching and training of emergency care nurses.

  • 2.
    Bose, Catarina Nahlén
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, The Swedish Red Cross University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    L. Elfström, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Experiences of a psychosocial intervention for patients with heart failure at one year after completion: A reflexive thematic analysis2022In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, article id 205715852211023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic heart failure is a common and a serious condition. Research has shown that chronic heart failure has been associated with detrimental effects on wellbeing. Coping effectiveness training (CET) has been applied for patients with heart failure to improve stress appraisal and stress management skills. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of participating in CET for patients with heart failure one year after completion. Eleven patients were interviewed. The study adheres to the SRQR guidelines. A thematic analysis generated three themes: rewarding but challenging to meet other people with heart failure; improved conditions to cope with stress; and not relevant to me. Implications for further development of the intervention were to include existential aspects, recognize comorbidities, test follow-up sessions and apply a codesign.

  • 3.
    Frank, C.
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lindbäck, Camilla
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Takman, C.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nordgren, L.
    Centre for Clinical Research in Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Healthcare professionals’ perceptions of their work with patients of working age with heart failure2018In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 160-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of knowledge about healthcare professionals’ perspectives on rehabilitation in relation to heart failure. Still, collaboration between different professionals can impact patients. The purpose of this study was to describe healthcare professionals’ perceptions of their work with patients of working age with heart failure. The sample population consisted of six nurses, one physiotherapist and one cardiologist. One individual interview and two focus-group interviews were conducted. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Three descriptive categories were constructed: ‘the impact of heart failure on patients’ life situations’, ‘heart failure service’, and ‘patients’ process of returning to work’. To support patients, healthcare professionals need to find ways to combine patients’ personal needs with protocol-driven care. © The Author(s) 2017.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Anbäcken, Els-Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Zander, Viktoria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Elfström, Magnus L.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Working with short-term goal-directed reablement with older adults: strengthened by a collaborative approach2019In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased number of older adults who experience longevity requires increased investment in healthcare services. Short-term goal-directed reablement is expected to strengthen the functional capacity and quality of life of older adults, while homecare hours, and thus municipal expenditures, decrease. Facilitation of successful interprofessional collaboration includes not only enhancing coordination structurally, but also establishing a commitment regarding culture that overcomes professionally differentiated attitudes. Nurses have an obvious role in these multi-professional teams and the study explores some aspects' of working in this type of collaboration. The aim was to illuminate the meaning of working with short-term goal-directed reablement of older adults as experienced by an interprofessional team. Data were collected after an intervention with goal-directed time-limited reablement of older people. Written narratives from an interprofessional team were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Findings identified four major thematic structures that characterized the meaning: 1) Reliable relationship; including the aspects ‘Confidence between the older adult and staff’, ‘A sense of security’ and ‘Continuity’, 2) Empowered participation, including the following aspects: ‘Listen to the older adult’s desires’ and ‘Put the person in control’, 3) Team with a negotiated approach, including the aspects: ‘Closeness’, ‘Same direction and overarching goal’, ‘Learning from interprofessional dialogue’, 4) Time for growth with the aspects ‘Creating harmony’ and ‘Building the older adult’s self-confidence’. The process of reablement seemed strengthened by the collaborative approach of different professions and their combined efforts. The present study argues that teamwork gives confidence both in terms of general knowledge of reablement but also specific confidence in one’s profession.

  • 5.
    Harder, Maria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Andersson, Sara
    Mälardalen University.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Child healthcare nurses’ encounters with parents whose child is overweight2019In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nurses in the Swedish child healthcare system can make a difference by offering support to parents of children who areoverweight or at risk of becoming so. Still, research concerning these nurses’ clinical practice when encountering parents whosechild is overweight is inadequate. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ clinical practice when encountering parents of anoverweight child. Data were collected through interviews with 10 nurses, and a content analysis approach was used. The nurses’clinical practice is described in relation to Olander’s theory: Individualising actions, Creating a dialogue, Documenting, andFocusing on normality. This study adds knowledge about nurses’ clinical practice in encounters with parents whose child isoverweight. Also, it adds information on how an issue in a specific care situation may contribute to further understanding anduse of an existing theory in caring science.

  • 6.
    Holmberg, Mats
    et al.
    Centre for Clinical Research Sormland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Department of Ambulance Service, Katrineholm, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hammarbäck, Staffan
    Centre for Clinical Research Sormland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Växjö, Sweden; Department of Ambulance Service, Katrineholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Henrik
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Registered nurses’ experiences of assessing patients with mental illness in emergency care: A qualitative descriptive study2020In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 151-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with mental illness are exposed and experience themselves as not being taken seriously in emergency care. Registered nurses need to assess patients with mental illness from a holistic perspective comprising both a physical and an existential dimension. The aim of the study was to describe registered nurses’ (RNs) experiences of assessing patients with mental illness in emergency care. Twenty-eight RNs in prehospital and in-hospital emergency care were individually interviewed. The interviews were analysed descriptively. The design followed the COREQ-checklist. One main theme ‘A conditional patient assessment’ and two themes; ‘A challenged professional role’ and ‘A limited openness for the patient’, comprising in turn four sub-themes emerged. Although the RNs showed willingness to understand the mental illness aspects of their patients, they were insufficient in their assessments. This implies the importance of developing emergency care RNs’ competence, knowledge and self-confidence in assessments and care of patients with mental illness.

  • 7.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Röda Korsets Högskola, Avdelningen Vård och Omvårdnad, Sweden.
    Global Nursing: Educating future nurses for tomorrow’s nursing care needs2017In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 172-174Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The world has witnessed the most comprehensive refugee diaspora of modern history. Sweden has been one of the countriesthat has welcomed people and given them refuge. Refugees are in need of quality nursing care that is provided by professionaland knowledgeable registered nurses. However, taking into account this global mobility and the resulting shift in demographiccharacteristics, nurses need to be particularly competent in relation to addressing global issues. The question is, are futurenurses educated with enough relevant knowledge and skills to be able to meet tomorrow’s nursing care needs? The SwedishRed Cross University College (SRCUC) has contributed to the global discourse in several aspects, not least those elementsrelated to the International Red Cross tradition and its basic humanitarian principles. We would like to share the stipulateddefinition that guides our subject profile area: global nursing. To answer the question that first concerned the SRCUC, wepreviously had conducted a traditional undergraduate nursing education that needed to be updated in relation to what is nowhappening globally. By developing and promoting the relevant knowledge and skills in global nursing, we believe that futurenurses will be prepared to accommodate tomorrow’s nursing care needs.

  • 8.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Section for Health Promotion and Care Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Towards a global nursing curriculum for the 21st century: Rethinking health through the lens of a sustainability paradigm – a contemporary issue2023In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 43, no 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education has historically been designed in harmony with societal development. However, the world is becoming increasingly complex, and we face ongoing global challenges. A new, progressive step towards a global nursing curriculum is needed. This development is anticipated, and nursing students often request knowledge and perspectives that will prepare them to care in a sustainable way. To provide this and ensure equal health, intersectional perspectives must be at the foundation of future caring activities. There is thus a societal shift that makes it necessary to take a decisive step towards rethinking health through the lens of a sustainability paradigm.

  • 9.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    Kraft, Mia
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    A global nursing framework in the Swedish Red Cross undergraduate nursing program2018In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alongside a globalized world and a demographic shift in Sweden, future nurses must provide globally significant nursing care based on relevant knowledges and skills. To contribute to the global nursing discourse, this article aims to describe the process undertaken in developing and implementing a global nursing approach and curriculum in the Swedish Red Cross undergraduate nursing program. A comprehensive process of educational change was carried out, targeting both faculty and students with various academic activities. The new global-oriented curriculum was evaluated positively by nursing students, and a definition of global nursing was disseminated among educators. Nursing students at the Swedish Red Cross University College are now encouraged to advocate for vulnerable persons in need of healthcare services and to counteract inequalities and social injustice in sustainable ways. It is suggested that a global nursing framework is what is required when educating nurses to meet tomorrow’s nursing care needs.

  • 10.
    Rylander, Annelie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Fredriksson, Stina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stenwall, Ewa
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Significant aspects of nursing within the process of end-of-life communication in an oncological context2019In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of end-of-life communications has previously been described and found to be given late in the patient’s palliative care. There is a need for earlier and more continuous end-of-life-communications throughout the patient’s care to reduce anxiety, confusion, and promote participation. Registered nurses (RNs) have a unique closeness to the patient and the ability to identify early the need for end-of-life communication. The aim of this study was to describe crucial aspects of nursing in end-of-life communication in an oncology context. The study was designed as a qualitative content analysis of in-depth interviews with RNs working in oncology in-patient care units. Two domains were identified: before, and after end-of-life communications, with the categories importance of being well prepared to identify both the patient’s and their family’s needs. Cooperation and interaction between physicians and RNs were crucial to be able to support patients and their relatives around the clock. The presence of RNs encouraged further conversations about the patients’ conditions to gain insight into the new situation. End-of-life communication should not only be medicine oriented and performed by physicians. Involvement of RNs’ expertise enables increased patient/relative participation as well as reduced anxiety and suffering, creating clarity and safety for all involved in care.

  • 11.
    Söderbäck, Maja
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Harder, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Ranheim, Albertine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Being in care situations with young children presents ambigious challenges.2015In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 0, no 0, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 11 of 11
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