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  • 1.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Organizational presence and place: Sociomaterial place work in the Swedish outdoor industry2019In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 389-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore the relation between organizational presence and the place in which such a presence is enacted. To this end I mobilize Doreen Massey’s processual conceptualization of place as an event consisting of a bundle of trajectories. By following the presentification of a Swedish company, Fjällräven, in the natural environment in the North of Sweden during Fjällräven Classic, I show that the organization is not made present in place, but through place production. I propose the concept of place work to express the work done by representatives of the organization, but also by other humans and nonhumans, to make the throwntogetherness of the place result in a rather coherent and stable construction through which the organization is made present. Place work is therefore work through which organizational presence and place are recursively co-creating. The concept of place work expands what we can learn about the “where” of an organization when building on an ontology of performativity.

  • 2.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Performative narcissism: When organizations are made successful, admirable, and unique through narcissistic work2017In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 431-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dramatic stories of corporate crises appear in newspapers and magazines all over the world; one explanation offered by scholars has been that the affected organization suffered (literally) from narcissism. As responsible, ethical, non-narcissistic behavior is claimed to be crucial for management, the purpose of this article is to advance our knowledge about narcissism in organizations by developing an understanding of which organizational work enacts organizations as successful, admired, and unique. The dominant use of narcissism as a pathological condition limits the possibility to learn about organizing processes since it provides simplistic explanations. By introducing the notion of performative narcissism, we re-focus attention from the pathological condition of organizations to potentially pervasive organizational practices. Thus, we see that narcissistic work is a sociomaterial process not limited to organizational borders, but connecting and enrolling people, artifacts, animals, and places into mutually dependent, shifting, and composite assemblages that emerge through practices reproducing the organization as successful and unique.

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  • 3.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    Univ Trento, Via Verdi 28, I-38122 Trento, Italy.;Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    One turn ... and now another one: Do the turn to practice and the turn to affect have something in common?2017In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 345-358Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The turn to practice has been prominent in the community of Management Learning and still occupies an important place in the debate that approaches practice from the standpoint of learning and knowing. On considering how the turn to practice contributes to the ongoing conversation on post-epistemologies, one notes a convergence with another turn'. The turn to affect started more or less in the same years as the turn to practice, but the conversation between the two has not yet been fully articulated. I argue that both share a concern for (1) a relational epistemology, (2) the body and (3) sociomateriality. To show how they may interact, three vignettes are presented to illustrate their commonalities and how they try to produce in the reader an affective reaction. This article is also the outcome of an experimentation conducted with a visual writer during the Organizational Learning, Knowledge and Capabilities conference in Milan, and it proposes a reflection on the limits of representationalism.

  • 4.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    et al.
    Univ Trento, I-38122 Trento, Italy..
    Murgia, Annalisa
    Univ Trento, I-38122 Trento, Italy..
    Imagine being asked to evaluate your CEO ...: Using the constructive controversy approach to teach gender and management in times of economic crisis2015In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 6-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the relationship between gender and management as intertwined discursive practices. Following a constructive controversial approach, we proposed to the students to complete a short story in which they have to give a feedback either to a fictitious female or to a male boss. The article has a dual aim since it offers a reflection on a teaching methodology suited to foster critical thinking in the classroom and analyzes the narratives so produced in search of what constitutes the students' idea of good management. In positioning men/women CEO within a narrative, students enact a moral order that evaluates management in society. Their narratives reveal how the economic crisis has undermined the positive image of the male manager, while femaleness is emphasized for its anti-managerial imaginary. Moreover, the idea of what constitutes good management is constructed around an idea of care for both male and female CEOs.

  • 5.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    et al.
    Univ Trento, I-38122 Trento, Italy..
    Rodeschini, Giulia
    Univ Trento, I-38122 Trento, Italy..
    Caring as a collective knowledgeable doing: About concern and being concerned2016In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 266-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Care is not an innate human capacity; rather, it is an organizational competence, a situated knowing that a group of professionals enact while attending to their everyday tasks. We propose a post-humanist practice approach to reading care as a matter of concern for those producing care and for society at large. Care is framed as a collective knowledgeable doing', it is not an object or a quality that is added to work; rather, it is caring', an ongoing sociomaterial accomplishment. Through an ethnography in a nursing home for the elderly, we describe: (a) how caring was collectively performed in keeping a common orientation, (b) how caring was inscribed in a texture of practices, and (c) how a technological change in nutrition practice mobilized ethics as practice in situated decision-making. Since natural nutrition is being increasingly replaced by artificial feeding, we describe how the collective and organizational ethic of care with tube feeding is talked about in practice, in a front-stage situation and in the back-stage one. In this process, the duality of care as a matter of concern and as the process of being concerned by caring becomes visible.

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