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  • 1.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Dehghanpour Farashah, Ali
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Thomas, Janice
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Feeling good, being good and looking good: motivations for, and benefits from, project management certification2018In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 498-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project management (PM) is one of many occupations following a path to professionalization that includes voluntary certification. It has been said that certification, and especially voluntary certification, can be seen as an approach to being good by improving our competence in the profession, or a means to looking good, essentially signaling the capabilities of the holder. Based on self-determination theory, we contribute to this discussion the notion of feeling good whereby certification provides a way to challenge one’s capabilities, provide self-actualization, and a sense of worth. Using two sets of survey responses, collected 10 years apart (2004 and 2014), we assess whether there are differences in the demographics of those seeking voluntary project management certification, and the motivations (expected benefits), and realized benefits associated with this certification, at these two points in time. Demographically, the people with certification and those not pursuing certification did not exhibit any significant differences in either time period. Analyses indicate that feeling good and being good are the main motivators but participants pursuing certification in 2014 reported lower levels of motivations and received more benefit than those in 2004. Comparing responses as to why professionals pursue voluntary PM certification across a decade span, gives us an indication of how these perceptions may be changing with the increased popularity of the certification. We compare these findings to similar studies examining other volunteer certifications and conclude by discussing the potential impact of these changes from the perspective of the individuals seeking certification, the occupation, and certifying organizations.

  • 2.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå university, Sweden.
    Dehghanpour Farashah, Ali
    Umeå university, Sweden.
    Thomas, Janice
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Project management self-efficacy as a predictor of project performance: Constructing and validating a domain-specific scale2016In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 1417-1432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measures of self-efficacy beliefs have been shown to be the best predictor of individual performance in many disciplines over 30 years. This makes measures of perceived self-efficacy a good indicator for those interested in hiring for, or improving specific skill sets. In project management, measuring the skill level of project managers is an important practical and academic question. Practically, hiring managers and program managers, needs an indicator of performance to help select the most appropriate project managers for each project. Academically, a common, established scale to measure project management self-efficacy would provide a tool for improving project management training and education, and increasing the comparability of research results across samples, industries and project results. This paper presents the construction and validation of a set of domain-specific, project management self-efficacy scales and provides evidence of its ability to predict project performance.

  • 3.
    Dehghanpour Farashah, Ali
    et al.
    Umeå university, Sweden.
    Thomas, Janice
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå university, Sweden.
    Exploring the value of project management certification in selection and recruiting2019In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 14-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many years project management has been moving toward professionalization through voluntary certification. Simultaneously, recruiters increasingly use voluntary professional certification as a signal of applicant competencies and likely future performance, to increase the efficiency of the selection process. This practice increases the value of certification to holders and leads to the growth of certification. However, despite significant research into the value of voluntary certification in numerous occupations, results linking certification with performance are tentative at best. We contribute to the growing body of research exploring the performance signaling ability of certification by empirically examining the case of project management professional certification using survey responses from 452 (certified (370), and uncertified (82)) international project managers. Our findings provide some support for this recruitment and selection practice, not through a direct relationship between certification and performance but by showing that self-efficacy mediates the relationship. Certification also relates to higher levels of professionalism. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings for recruiters, project management professionals, and professional associations.

  • 4.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Rethinking dichotomization: A critical perspective on the use of “hard” and “soft” in project management research2014In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 568-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on the categorization – dichotomization – between “hard” and “soft” in project management research. This categorization is becoming more increasingly used in project management research for example by stating that some projects are “hard”, while other projects are “soft”, that some project skills are “hard”, while other project skills are “soft” etc. The aim is to discuss this dichotomization as an example of hierarchization – a power struggle between opposites – within project management research and literature and acknowledge the effects for project management research and practice of unreflective upholding of this dichotomy. We provide a critical review and discussion of stage-gate models as an example of “hard” project management approaches, and agile methods as an example of “soft” approaches to project management and acknowledge that in project management practice, it seems as if “hard” and “soft” approaches are most often combined. Hence, this dichotomy seems to be upheld by the research community while practitioners show a more holistic perspective to project management.

  • 5.
    Olsson, R
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    In search of opportunity management: is the risk management process enough?2007In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 745-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of risk has always been present in the industrial environment. However, not until recent years has it been actively managed for products, in projects, and, as a consequence, for the organization. Project risk management has been in focus within different organizations, and has proven its value in reducing risks in projects. Risk, however, could be described as the negative outcome of an uncertainty. The opposite of risk would then be opportunity. The aim of this paper is to find empirical evidence supporting a theory that current methodologies for risk management focus mainly on risk. If the results of this study show that methodologies in practice actually focus more on risk, the need to enhance opportunity management would be apparent. Based on interviews with people who actively work with project management and who also seek continuous improvements by being active members of project management networks, this study presents three major factors needed for managing opportunities: the ability of the project manager to develop a holistic view within the project, the organizational support and interest, and the ability to understand how other organizations affect the project objectives. Furthermore, this paper explores the perception of opportunity as it shifts between organizations and levels within the organization.

  • 6.
    Olsson, R
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Deleryd, Mats
    Organizational Cultural Change Through the Use of Project Risk ManagementIn: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
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