mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ.
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Bellaagh, Katalin
    Minist Hlth & Social Affairs Sweden.
    Patterns of contract motives and work involvement in temporary work: Relationschips to work-related and general well-being2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 565-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary work is characterized by heterogeneity, and contract motives and work involvement are believed to differentiate temporary workers, which may explain their divergence in terms of subjective well-being. Applying a person-oriented approach using questionnaire data from a sample of Swedish temporary workers (N = 184), this study identified six patterns, characterized by distinct combinations of voluntary and involuntary contract motives and work involvement. While controlling for demographics, comparative analyses found differences between these patterns in terms of work-related and general well-being. These findings indicate that knowledge about temporary work and its various consequences is enhanced by considering whole patterns instead of single variables in a person-oriented approach.

  • 2.
    Guest, D. E.
    et al.
    King’s College London, United Kingdom.
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Temporary employment contracts and employee well-being during and after the financial crisis: Introduction to the special issue2019In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 165-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary employment has become a feature of the contemporary labour market, although its extent varies considerably across European countries. It is widely assumed that the experience of temporary work is likely to lower worker well-being. However, a major European study in 2005 found that temporary workers reported higher well-being than permanent workers. Since then, the financial crisis of 2008 and the resulting shedding of labour seems likely to have had a damaging effect on the well-being of temporary workers. The introductory article outlines these issues and introduces the subsequent articles in this special issue which explore the well-being and employment security of temporary workers in the aftermath of the financial crisis. In drawing them together, it is noted that temporary workers appear to have fared no worse than permanent workers. Indeed, job insecurity seems to have spread to permanent workers, particularly in the Mediterranean countries, creating a renewed emphasis on the role of employability.

  • 3.
    Papahristodoulou, Christos
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Is Lean Production the Solution?1994In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 457-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Japanese system of lean production is the most efficient way for manufacturing cars argue Womack et al. in their MIT study The Machine that Changed the World (1990). They strongly recom- mend Western companies to learn and adapt to it, if they want to survive in the 1990s. This paper shows that lean production per se is not sufficient to explain the Japanese superiority unless favourable macroeconomic and microeconomic conditions prevail (precisely as for mass production). It also points to some methodological and analytical deficits in the MIT study.

  • 4.
    Rigotti, Thomas
    et al.
    Universität Mainz Germany.
    Mohr, Gisela
    Universität Leipzig.
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Job insecurity among temporary workers: Looking through the gender lens2015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 523-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the gender model and the life context model, the financial and domestic responsibilities and expectations associated with getting a new assignment are tested as potential gender specific moderators of the link between job insecurity and commitment, performance, and depressive moods. In a cross-sectional international questionnaire study of 1981 temporary workers’ three-way interactions between job insecurity, gender, and the moderators were tested. Expectations play a moderating role for women only, intensifying the negative relationship between job insecurity and commitment. Financial responsibility strengthened the negative relationship of job insecurity with commitment, as well as its positive relationship with depressive moods for women and men alike. Domestic responsibility plays a moderating role in the link between job insecurity and depressive moods and performance for women, aggravating depressive moods and reducing performance. For men, domestic responsibility had a buffering effect on the relationship between job insecurity and commitment.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf