https://www.mdu.se/

mdu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123456 1 - 50 of 270
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Azimoh, Chukwuma Leonard
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Klintenberg, Patrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Karlsson, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Illuminated but not electrified: An assessment of the impact of Solar Home System on rural households in South Africa2015In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 155, p. 354-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of the off-grid electrification program in South Africa using the Solar Home System (SHS) was a central component of the government policy aimed at bringing development to un-electrified households. An assessment of the performance of SHS in many countries provided little evidence to support the development impact of the system. The general perception is that the SHS program is wasting government funds and has no hope of achieving the set objectives. Previous scientific reports have concluded that SHS is the most viable technology for bringing about socio-economic development to rural households. Most of these conclusions have been based on one sided arguments and largely on anecdotal evidence. This study provides a pluralistic view of the subject from the perspective of the energy service companies (ESCOs) and the households using the equipment. The development impact of SHS is subjected to scientific analysis by investigating the economic and social dimensions of the program. Additionally, the sustainability of the South African SHS program is assessed by investigating the challenges facing the ESCOs and the households. The study reveals that illumination provided by SHS electricity has profound impact on the livelihoods of rural households. Due to the limited capacity of SHS for productive and thermal use, there are limited direct economic benefits to the households. The associated economic impact is peripheral to the secondary usage of SHS electricity. SHS has improved the productivity of small scale business owners who utilize the light from SHS to do business at night. Irregularities in payment of subsidy funds and energy bills, high operation cost, non-optimal use of SHS, grid encroachment, and lack of customer satisfaction contribute to make the business unsustainable for the ESCOs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Azimoh, Chukwuma Leonard
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Klintenberg, Patrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Karlsson, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    An assessment of unforeseen losses resulting from inappropriate use of solar home systems in South Africa2014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 136, p. 336-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the challenges to the sustainability of the Solar Home System (SHS) electrification program in South Africa is equipment theft. In response to this, communities susceptible to solar panel theft resort to mounting their panels flat on the ground so they can be looked after during the day and taken indoors at night for safe keeping. Other households use their security lights to illuminate their environment and provide security for pole and roof mounted solar panels at night. These actions have consequential effects on the performance of the SHS. Several studies have detected resentment from households regarding the low power quality from these systems. Most scientific contributions on the issue of low power from SHS have focused on the challenges based on the technical designs of the systems. The power losses due to the usage pattern of the system has not received much attention. This study therefore reports on the technical losses as a result of the deviation from the designed and installed specification of the system by the users in order to protect their systems. It also investigates the linkage between the technical and economic losses which affects the sustainability of SHS program. A case study was performed in Thlatlaganya village within Limpopo province in South Africa. Technical analysis using PVSYST solar software revealed that the energy output and performance of the battery is compromised as a result of these practices. Economic analysis indicates that the battery life and the economics of owning and operating SHS are affected negatively. The study recommends solutions to mitigate these losses, and proposes a cost effective way of optimizing the operation of SHS using a Bench-Rack system for mounting solar panels.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Bao, Minglei
    et al.
    Zhejiang Univ, Coll Elect Engn, Hangzhou 310058, Peoples R China..
    Ding, Yi
    Zhejiang Univ, Coll Elect Engn, Hangzhou 310058, Peoples R China..
    Sang, Maosheng
    Zhejiang Univ, Coll Elect Engn, Hangzhou 310058, Peoples R China..
    Li, Daqing
    Beihang Univ, Sch Reliabil & Syst Engn, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Shao, Changzheng
    Zhejiang Univ, Coll Elect Engn, Hangzhou 310058, Peoples R China..
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Inst Technol, Sch Chem Sci & Engn, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Modeling and evaluating nodal resilience of multi-energy systems under windstorms2020In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 270, article id UNSP 115136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing frequency and extent of extreme weather events, the resilient operation of multi-energy systems (MESs) has drawn attention nowadays. However, there is little study on the methodology with a set of key indicators to quantify the resilience of MESs with the consideration of the impacts of extreme weather. To address the problem, this paper proposes a framework to evaluate the time-dependent resilience of MESs considering energy interactions during extreme weather events, such as windstorms. Firstly, the multi-phase performance curve is utilized to describe the response behavior of MESs at different phases under the impacts of windstorms. Secondly, a service-based optimal energy flow model is developed to minimize the consequences caused by windstorms through the coordination among different energy subsystems. In order to model the chaotic failures and restoration of components, the Monte-Carlo simulation technique is applied. Furthermore, nodal resilience metrics for different energy carriers are proposed to quantify the resilience in MESs. Numerical studies demonstrate the capability of the proposed technique to quantify the resilience of MESs under windstorms. The results show that the resilience performance level of MESs can differ in different regions with the impacts of windstorms. The findings can provide a useful reference for system operators to constitute targeted resilience improvement measures.

  • 4.
    Bao, Z.
    et al.
    School of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, China.
    Li, J.
    School of Transportation Engineering, Tongji University, China.
    Bai, X.
    Cockrell School of Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, United States.
    Xie, C.
    Urban Mobility Institute, Tongji University, China.
    Chen, Z.
    Division of Engineering and Computer Science, New York University Shanghai, China.
    Xu, M.
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China.
    Shang, W. -L
    College of Metropolitan Transportation, Beijing University of Technology, China.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    An optimal charging scheduling model and algorithm for electric buses2023In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 332, article id 120512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrification poses a promising low-carbon or even zero-carbon transportation solution, serving as a strategic approach to reducing carbon emissions and promoting carbon neutrality in the transportation sector. Along the transportation electrification pathway, the goal of carbon neutrality can be further accelerated with an increasing amount of electricity being generated from renewable energies. The past decade observed the rapid development of battery technologies and deployment of electricity infrastructure worldwide, fostering transportation electrification to expand from railways to light and then heavy vehicles on roadways. In China, a massive number of electric buses have been employed and operated in dozens of metropolises. An important daily operations issue with these urban electric buses is how to coordinate their charging activities in a cost-effective manner, considering various physical, financial, institutional, and managerial constraints. This paper addresses a general charging scheduling problem for an electric bus fleet operated across multiple bus lines and charging depots and terminals, aiming at finding an optimal set of charging location and time decisions given the available charging windows. The charging windows for each bus are predetermined in terms of its layovers at depots and terminals and each of them is discretized into a number of charging slots with the same time duration. A mixed linear integer programming model with binary charging slot choice and continuous state-of-charge (SOC) variables is constructed for minimizing the total charging cost of the bus fleet subject to individual electricity consumption rates, electricity charging rates, time-based charging windows, battery SOC bounds, time-of-use (TOU) charging tariffs, and station-specific electricity load capacities. A Lagrangian relaxation framework is employed to decouple the joint charging schedule of a bus fleet into a number of independent single-bus charging schedules, which can be efficiently addressed by a bi-criterion dynamic programming algorithm. A real-world regional electric bus fleet of 122 buses in Shanghai, China is selected for validating the effectiveness and practicability of the proposed charging scheduling model and algorithm. The optimization results numerically reveal the impacts of TOU tariffs, station load capacities, charging infrastructure configurations, and battery capacities on the bus system performance as well as individual recharging behaviors, and justify the superior solution efficiency of our algorithm against a state-of-the-art commercial solver. 

  • 5.
    Bartusch, Cajsa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Odlare, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Wester, Lars
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Exploring variance in residential electricity consumption: Household features and building properties2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 92, p. 637-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved means of controlling electricity consumption plays an important part in boosting energy efficiency in the Swedish power market. Developing policy instruments to that end requires more in-depth statistics on electricity use in the residential sector, among other things. The aim of the study has accordingly been to assess the extent of variance in annual electricity consumption in single-family homes as well as to estimate the impact of household features and building properties in this respect using independent samples t-tests and one-way as well as univariate independent samples analyses of variance. Statistically significant variances associated with geographic area, heating system, number of family members, family composition, year of construction, electric water heater and electric underfloor heating have been established. The overall result of the analyses is nevertheless that variance in residential electricity consumption cannot be fully explained by independent variables related to household and building characteristics alone. As for the methodological approach, the results further suggest that methods for statistical analysis of variance are of considerable value in indentifying key indicators for policy update and development.

  • 6. Beckinghausen, A.
    et al.
    Odlare, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Schwede, Sebastian
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    From removal to recovery: An evaluation of nitrogen recovery techniques from wastewater2020In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 263, article id 114616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nitrogen recovery is the next step in the improvement of the wastewater treatment process, utilizing this important nutrient for fertilizers to decrease use of energy, petrochemicals, and impact on the environment. The majority of wastewater treatment plants currently employ methods to remove nitrogen which are energy intensive and have no additional benefits besides complying with effluent concentration limits. Instead, recovering nitrogen allows simultaneous treatment of wastewater while collecting a concentrated ammonia product, creating a circular economy solution. This review acts to compile current research regarding nitrogen recovery and compare different techniques' recovery efficiencies and energy requirements. One outcome of this review is that more than one third of the techniques reviewed had little comments around the energy question, and thus more research needs to take place as these recovery systems continue to evolve towards full scale implementation. Additionally, a basic economic analysis was completed to demonstrate potential investment opportunities to implement these technologies. From this investigation, gas permeable membrane technology has the potential to recover ammonia from wastewater using little energy and may provide a small income with the sale of the product. Other techniques such as vacuum membrane distillation with acid absorption need further validation to determine the energy costs, as the amount of heat recycling has a great impact on the overall energy and economic balances. Finally, a discussion of the misalignment of products from recovery techniques and fertilizers in use today highlights the lack of communication and information sharing between the research community and the end users. 

  • 7.
    Beckinghausen, Aubrey
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Reynders, Jonathan
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Chem Engn, Hatfield, South Africa..
    Merckel, Ryan
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Chem Engn, Hatfield, South Africa..
    Wu, Yun Wen
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Chem Engn, Hatfield, South Africa..
    Marais, Heidi
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Schwede, Sebastian
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Post-pyrolysis treatments of biochars from sewage sludge and A. mearnsii for ammonia (NH4-n) recovery2020In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 271, article id UNSP 115212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NH4-N-loaded biochars are suitable candidates for soil amendment and fertilization. Sewage sludge-based biochar and biochar from the invasive species black wattle were used as sorbents for the adsorption of ammonia from a concentrated solution to mimic the wastewater treatment plant reject water stream. To increase ammonium recovery efficiency, two post-pyrolysis activation techniques were compared: steam activation and hydrogen peroxide treatment. It was found that the success of the treatment options was material dependent; therefore, post-pyrolysis treatments will require optimization for different applications based on feedstock. A simplified version of an adsorption process simulated in Aspen Tech predicts that NH4-N may be recovered at an energy cost lower than that of the Haber-Bosch process for black wattle biochar yields of below 19.5%. The biooil and syngas produced during pyrolysis can be used to lessen the energy requirements of the process, so that the solid portion may be utilized as an adsorbent and soil fertilizer. The energy-based sustainability of this technology warrants a more in-depth investigation for evaluation of the techno-economic feasibility for this class of loaded sorbents, and whether this method of nitrogen capture from wastewater is a suitable replacement of the costly Haber-Bosch process.

  • 8.
    Benavente, F.
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anders, Lundblad
    Division of Safety and Transport/Electronics, RISE, Research Institutes of Sweden, Borås, Sweden.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Department of Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhang, Y.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cabrera, S.
    Instituto de Investigaciones Químicas, Carrera de Ciencias Químicas, UMSA Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, Bolivia.
    Lindbergh, G.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Photovoltaic/battery system sizing for rural electrification in Bolivia: Considering the suppressed demand effect2019In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 235, p. 519-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rural electrification programs usually do not consider the impact that the increment of demand has on the reliability of off-grid photovoltaic (PV)/battery systems. Based on meteorological data and electricity consumption profiles from the highlands of Bolivian Altiplano, this paper presents a modelling and simulation framework for analysing the performance and reliability of such systems. Reliability, as loss of power supply probability (LPSP), and cost were calculated using simulated PV power output and battery state of charge profiles. The effect of increasing the suppressed demand (SD) by 20% and 50% was studied to determine how reliable and resilient the system designs are. Simulations were performed for three rural application scenarios: a household, a school, and a health centre. Results for the household and school scenarios indicate that, to overcome the SD effect, it is more cost-effective to increase the PV power rather than to increase the battery capacity. However, with an increased PV-size, the battery ageing rate would be higher since the cycles are performed at high state of charge (SOC). For the health centre application, on the other hand, an increase in battery capacity prevents the risk of electricity blackouts while increasing the energy reliability of the system. These results provide important insights for the application design of off-grid PV-battery systems in rural electrification projects, enabling a more efficient and reliable source of electricity.

  • 9.
    Birgersson, K. E.
    et al.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, Singapore 117576, Singapore..
    Balaya, P.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Mech Engn, Singapore 117576, Singapore..
    Chou, S. K.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Mech Engn, Singapore 117576, Singapore..
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Energy Solutions for a Sustainable World2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Budt, M.
    et al.
    Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental Safety, Germany.
    Wolf, D.
    Heliocentris Industry GmbH, Germany.
    Span, R.
    Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    A review on compressed air energy storage: Basic principles, past milestones and recent developments2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 170, p. 250-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decades a variety of different approaches to realize Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) have been undertaken. This article gives an overview of present and past approaches by classifying and comparing CAES processes. This classification and comparison is substantiated by a broad historical background on how CAES has evolved over time from its very beginning until its most recent advancements. A broad review on the variety of CAES concepts and compressed air storage (CAS) options is given, evaluating their individual strengths and weaknesses. The concept of exergy is applied to CAES in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of CAES. Furthermore, the importance of accurate fluid property data for the calculation and design of CAES processes is discussed. In a final outlook upcoming R&D challenges are addressed. 

  • 11.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    Univ So Queensland, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia; Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chen, Guangnan
    Univ So Queensland, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia.
    Yusaf, Talal
    Univ So Queensland, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia.
    Chen, Shulin
    Washington State Univ, Pullman, WA 99164 USA.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sustainable energy and climate protection solutions in agriculture2014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 114, p. 735-736Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Cabeza, Luisa F.
    et al.
    GREA Innovació Concurrent, Universitat de Lleida, Edifici CREA, Pere de Cabrera s/n, 25001 Lleida, Spain.
    Martin, Viktoria
    Royal Institute of Technology,.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Advances in energy storage research and development: The 12th International Conference on Energy Storage Innostock 20122013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 109, p. 291-292Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Jige Quan, S.
    Georgia Institute of Technology, US.
    Robbio, F.I.
    ABB AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lundblad, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Zhang, Y.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ma, Tao
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China.
    Karlsson, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Optimization of a residential district with special consideration on energy and water reliability2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 194, p. 751-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cities around the world have reached a critical situation when it comes to energy and water supply, threatening the urban sustainable development. From an engineering and architecture perspective it is mandatory to design cities taking into account energy and water issues to achieve high living and sustainability standards. The aim of this paper is to develop an optimization model for the planning of residential urban districts with special consideration of renewables and water harvesting integration. The optimization model is multi-objective which uses a genetic algorithm to minimize the system life cycle costs, and maximize renewables and water harvesting reliability through dynamic simulations. The developed model can be used for spatial optimization design of new urban districts. It can also be employed for analyzing the performances of existing urban districts under an energy-water-economic viewpoint.

    The optimization results show that the reliability of the hybrid renewables based power system can vary between 40 and 95% depending on the scenarios considered regarding the built environment area and on the cases concerning the overall electric load. The levelized cost of electricity vary between 0.096 and 0.212 $/kW h. The maximum water harvesting system reliability vary between 30% and 100% depending on the built environment area distribution. For reliabilities below 20% the levelized cost of water is kept below 1 $/m3 making competitive with the network water tariff.

  • 14.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Dynamic modelling of a PV pumping system with special consideration on water demand2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 112, p. 635-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exploitation of solar energy in remote areas through photovoltaic (PV) systems is an attractive solution for water pumping for irrigation systems. The design of a photovoltaic water pumping system (PVWPS) strictly depends on the estimation of the crop water requirements and land use since the water demand varies during the watering season and the solar irradiation changes time by time. It is of significance to conduct dynamic simulations in order to achieve the successful and optimal design. The aim of this paper is to develop a dynamic modelling tool for the design of a of photovoltaic water pumping system by combining the models of the water demand, the solar PV power and the pumping system, which can be used to validate the design procedure in terms of matching between water demand and water supply. Both alternate current (AC) and direct current (DC) pumps and both fixed and two-axis tracking PV array were analyzed. The tool has been applied in a case study. Results show that it has the ability to do rapid design and optimization of PV water pumping system by reducing the power peak and selecting the proper devices from both technical and economic viewpoints. Among the different alternatives considered in this study, the AC fixed system represented the best cost effective solution.

  • 15.
    Cantore, N.
    et al.
    Department of Policy Research and Statistics, UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization), Austria.
    Schlör, H.
    Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-STE), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany.
    Voegele, S.
    Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-STE), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany.
    Kuckshinrichs, W.
    Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-STE), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany.
    Haraguchi, N.
    Department of Policy Research and Statistics, UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization), Austria.
    Nussbaumer, P.
    Climate Technology and Innovations Division, UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization), Austria.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Inclusive and sustainable industrial development: Measurement approaches for energy transformation2021In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 299, article id 117277Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Chen, Haoqian
    et al.
    Qingdao Univ, Coll Comp Sci & Technol, Ningxia Rd 308, Qingdao 266071, Peoples R China..
    Sui, Yi
    Qingdao Univ, Coll Comp Sci & Technol, Ningxia Rd 308, Qingdao 266071, Peoples R China.;Univ Tokyo, Ctr Spatial Informat Sci, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 2778568, Japan..
    Shang, Wen-long
    Beijing Univ Technol, Coll Metropolitan Transportat, Beijing Key Lab Traff Engn, Beijing 100124, Peoples R China.;Beijing Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Traff & Transportat, Beijing 100044, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Rencheng
    Qingdao Univ, Coll Comp Sci & Technol, Ningxia Rd 308, Qingdao 266071, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Zhiheng
    Univ Tokyo, Ctr Spatial Informat Sci, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 2778568, Japan..
    Wang, Changying
    Qingdao Univ, Coll Comp Sci & Technol, Ningxia Rd 308, Qingdao 266071, Peoples R China..
    Han, Chunjia
    Birkbeck Univ London, Dept Management, London WC1E 7HX, England..
    Zhang, Yuqian
    China Inst Marine Human Factors Engn, Yingshanhong Rd 117, Qingdao 266400, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Haoran
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Univ Tokyo, Ctr Spatial Informat Sci, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 2778568, Japan.
    Towards renewable public transport: Mining the performance of electric buses using solar-radiation as an auxiliary power source2022In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 325, article id 119863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming the road public transport to run on renewable energy is vital solution to achieve carbon neutral and net zero goals. This paper evaluates the potential of using solar radiation-generated electricity as an auxiliary power supplementary for the battery of electric buses, based on a developed framework that using publicly street-view panoramas, GPS trajectory data and DEM data as input parameters of solar radiation model. A case study of Qingdao, China with 547 bus routes, 28,661 street-view panoramas shows that the solar-radiation electricity generated at noon during the operation accounts for about one-fifth, one-eighth of the total elec-tricity consumption of a bus traveling one kilometer in a sunny day and a cloudy day, respectively. Spatial variability shows significant solar-radiation power generation advantages in newly-launched areas and expressway. The solar power generated in a sunny day can make a bus half of passengers and with air conditioner off at least one extra trip in 2:1 replacement schedule, and nearly close to one extra trip in 4:3 replacement schedule. A correlated relation between the solar-radiation power generation benefit and the operation schedule of electric buses is observed, implying that the high cost of 2:1 replacement schedule for long-distance routes during summer or winter can be reduced. The proposed framework can help us evaluate and understand the feasibility of solar radiation-generated electricity energy of electric bus fleets covering the large-scale urban areas at different times, locations, and weather conditions, so as to support effective decisions at better planning of PV-integrated electric buses.

  • 17.
    Chen, S.
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangdong, Peoples R China.
    Kharrazi, A.
    CMCC Fdn Euromediterranean Ctr Climate Change, Venice, Italy.
    Liang, S.
    Beijing Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Fath, B. D.
    Int Inst Appl Syst Anal, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Lenzen, M.
    Univ Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Advanced approaches and applications of energy footprints toward the promotion of global sustainability2020In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 261, article id 114415Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever-increasing energy demands pose huge environmental challenges globally. The strategies and methods that are chosen to address the energy crisis will, in part, determine the possibility of fulfilling the 1.5-degree global warming target set by the Paris Agreement, and of achieving the United Nations Sustainable Developmental Goals, two vital and ambitious objectives for humans in the coming decades. While numerous inventory and modelling approaches have been developed to evaluate direct and indirect energy requirements at multiple scales from industries to cities and to the global economy, a discussion on their implications for environmental sustainability is long overdue. In this study, we provide an overview of the research paradigm and the important approaches that have been developed to address energy sustainability and review the papers included in this Special Issue, which are representative of some of the major advancements in energy, carbon, and other hybrid footprint approaches. This Special Issue aims to gather and harmonize state-of-the-art energy accounting frameworks, models, and metrics that benefit the promotion of global sustainability. 

  • 18.
    Chen, S.
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Smart Grid of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
    Li, P.
    Key Laboratory of Smart Grid of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
    Ji, H.
    Key Laboratory of Smart Grid of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
    Yu, H.
    Key Laboratory of Smart Grid of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Wu, J.
    Institute of Energy, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Wang, C.
    Key Laboratory of Smart Grid of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
    Operational flexibility of active distribution networks with the potential from data centers2021In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 293, article id 116935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the development of information technology, the scale and quantity of internet data centers (IDCs) are expanding rapidly. IDCs have emerged as the major electricity consumers in active distribution networks (ADNs), which dramatically increase the electricity load and have a significant impact on the operational flexibility of ADNs. Geographically distributed IDCs can participate in the operation of ADNs with the potential for spatio-temporal load regulation. This paper proposes flexible dispatch strategies of data centers to improve the operational flexibility of ADNs. First, a data-power model of IT equipment is proposed based on piecewise linearization to describe the power consumption characteristics of data centers. The flexible dispatch strategies for the delay-tolerant workload are further proposed from two aspects of temporal transfer and spatial allocation. Then, considering the potential for spatio-temporal load regulation, the operational flexibility analysis model with data centers is formulated to adapt to the operational requirements of ADNs in complex environments. Case studies show that through the spatio-temporal regulation of workload, the energy efficiency of IDCs can be effectively improved. The flexible dispatch of IDCs can also reduce the voltage violation and feeder load imbalance of ADNs, which can facilitate providing the high-quality power supply for IDCs.

  • 19.
    Chen, S.
    et al.
    China University of Petroleum-Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Q.
    China University of Petroleum-Beijing, China.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Tianjin University of Commerce, China.
    Mclellan, B.
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Zhang, T.
    China University of Petroleum-Beijing, China.
    Tan, Z.
    Investment decision on shallow geothermal heating & cooling based on compound options model: A case study of China2019In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 254, article id 113655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing shallow geothermal energy is expected to play an important role to supply affordable, clean and reliable heating by many countries in the world. However, the development is mainly hindered by the high upfront investment costs and various risks involved in the exploration, construction and operation phases. The present study proposed a compound options model to explore the optimal investment timing and value based on the consideration of both investment and operational flexibilities. The Least Square Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods were employed in the model to find the solutions. A case study was carried out for China, and five scenarios were simulated to understand the effects of different policies including subsidy, carbon trading mechanism, preferential taxation and preferential electricity price. The obtained results show that, (i) the incentive policies are essential for the development of shallow geothermal energy, which can attract more investment before 2030; (ii) the government is suggested to carry out a preferential electricity price for shallow geothermal development, rather than increase the subsidy; (iii) the application of compound options method increases the investment value in all five scenarios, but its impact on investment timing varies.

  • 20.
    Chiaramonti, D.
    et al.
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Liden, G.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Advances in sustainable biofuel production and use: The XIX international symposium on alcohol fuels2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 102, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Chiaramonti, D.
    et al.
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Maniatis, K.
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Tredici, M.R
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Verdelho, V.
    EABA, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Life Cycle Assessment of Algae Biofuels: Needs and challenges2015In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 154, p. 1049-1051Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Chisti, Yusuf
    et al.
    Massey University.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Energy from algae: Current status and future trends: Algal biofuels – A status report2011In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 88, no 10, p. 3277-3279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Choi, Byungchul
    et al.
    Chonnam Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Su Han
    Chonnam Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Chiarmonti, David
    RE CORD Renewable Energy COnsortium R&D, Garbagnate Monastero, LC, Ital.
    Bae, Hyeun-Jong
    Chonnam Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sustainable alcohol fuels promoting mobility and climate stabilization: The 21st International Symposium on Alcohol Fuels2015In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 160, p. 561-565Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Chua, K. J.
    et al.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Mech Engn, Singapore.
    Chou, S. K.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Mech Engn, Singapore .
    Yang, W. M.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Mech Engn, Singapore .
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Achieving better energy-efficient air conditioning - A review of technologies and strategies2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 104, p. 87-104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air conditioning is essential for maintaining thermal comfort in indoor environments, particularly for hot and humid climates. Today, air conditioning, comprising cooling and dehumidification, has become a necessity in commercial and residential buildings and industrial processes. It accounts for a major share of the energy consumption of a building or facility. In tropical climates, the energy consumed by heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) can exceed 50% of the total energy consumption of a building. This significant figure is primarily due to the heavy duty placed on cooling technologies to remove both sensible and latent heat loads. Therefore, there is tremendous potential to improve the overall efficiency of the air-conditioning systems in buildings. Based on today's practical technology for cooling, the major components of a chiller plant are (I) compressors, (2) cooling towers, (3) pumps (chilled and cooling water) and (4) fans in air handling units. They all consume mainly electricity to operate. When specifying the kW/R ton of a plant, there are two levels of monitoring cooling efficiency: (1) at the efficiency of the chiller machines or the compressors which consume a major amount of electricity; and (2) at the overall efficiency of cooling plants which include the cooling towers, pumps for moving coolant (chilled and cooling water) to all air-handling units. Pragmatically, a holistic approach is necessary towards achieving a low energy input per cooling achieved such as 0.6 kW/R ton cooling or lower by considering all aspects of the cooling plant. In this paper, we present a review of recent innovative cooling technology and strategies that could potentially lower the kW/R ton of cooling systems - from the existing mean of 0.9 kW/R ton towards 0.6 kW/R ton or lower. The paper, broadly divided into three key sections (see Fig. 2), begins with a review of the recent novel devices that enhances the energy efficiency of cooling systems at the component level. This is followed by a review of innovative cooling systems designs that reduces energy use for air conditioning. Lastly, the paper presents recent developments in intelligent air-control strategies and smart chiller sequencing methodologies that reduce the primary energy utilization for cooling. The energy efficient cooling technology, innovative systems designs, and intelligent control strategies described in the paper have been recently researched or are on-going studies. Several have been implemented on a larger scale and, therefore, are examples of practical solutions that can be readily applied to suit specific needs. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Cuneo, A.
    et al.
    Thermochemical Power Group, Università di Genova, Italy.
    Zaccaria, Valentina
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Tucker, D.
    U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, United States.
    Sorce, A.
    Thermochemical Power Group, Università di Genova, Italy.
    Gas turbine size optimization in a hybrid system considering SOFC degradation2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 230, p. 855-864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coupling of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a gas turbine has been proven to result in extremely high efficiency and reduced emissions. The presence of the gas turbine can improve system durability compared to a standalone SOFC, because the turbomachinery can supply additional power as the fuel cell degrades to meet the power request. Since performance degradation is an obstacles to SOFC systems commercialization, the optimization of the hybrid system to mitigate SOFC degradation effects is of great interest. In this work, an optimization approach was used to innovatively study the effect of gas turbine size on system durability for a 400 kW fuel cell stack. A larger turbine allowed a bigger reduction in SOFC power before replacing the stack, but increased the initial capital investment and decreased the initial turbine efficiency. Thus, the power ratio between SOFC and gas turbine significantly influenced system economic results.

  • 26.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Naqvi, Muhammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hartwell, Philip
    BioRegional MiniMills Ltd, UK.
    Experimental and numerical investigation of pellet and black liquor gasification for polygeneration plant2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 204, p. 1066-1064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is vital to perform system analysis on integrated biomass gasification in chemical recovery systems in pulp and paper and heat and power plants for polygeneration applications. The proposed integration complements existing pulp and paper and heat and power production systems with production of chemicals such as methane and hydrogen. The potential to introduce gasification-based combined cycles comprising gas turbines and steam turbines to utilize black liquors and wood pellets also merits investigation. To perform such analysis, it is important to first build knowledge on expected synthesis gas composition by gasifying at smaller scale different types of feed stock. In the present paper, the synthesis gas quality from wood pellets gasification has been compared with black liquor gasification by means of numerical simulation as well as through pilot-scale experimental investigations. The experimental results have been correlated into partial least squares models to predict the composition of the synthesis gas produced under different operating conditions. The gas quality prediction models are combined with physical models using a generic open-source modelling language for investigating the dynamic performance of large-scale integrated polygeneration plants. The analysis is further complemented by considering potential gas separation using modern membrane technology for upgrading the synthesis gas with respect to hydrogen content. The experimental data and statistical models presented in this study form an important literature source for future use by the gasification and polygeneration research community on further integrated system analysis.

  • 27.
    Daianova, Lilia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Evaluation of a regional bioenergy system with local production of biofuel for transportation, integrated with a CHP plant2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 92, p. 739-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The share of renewable liquid fuels (ethanol, fatty acid methyl ester, biogas, and renewable electricity) in the total transportation fuel in Sweden, has increased by the end of 2009 to such level that e.g. domestic bioethanol production is unable to satisfy current ethanol fuel demand. Regional small-scale ethanol production can assist the region in covering the regional needs in transport fuel supply.

    Current case study system includes the production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power from locally available cereals straw. A mixed integer programming (MIP) model is developed for cost optimization of regional transport fuel supply (ethanol, biogas and petrol). The model is applied for two cases, one when ethanol production plant is integrated with an existing CHP plant (polygeneration), and one with a standalone ethanol production plant.

    The optimization results show that for both cases the changes in ethanol production costs have the biggest influence on the costs for supplying regional passenger car fleet with transport fuel. Petrol fuel price and straw production costs have also a significant effect on costs for supplying cars with transport fuel for both standalone ethanol production and integrated production system.

    By integrating the ethanol production process with a CHP plant, the costs for supplying regional passenger car fleet with transport fuel can be cut by 31%, from 150 to 104 €/MW h fuel, which should be compared with E5 costs of 115 €/MW h (excl VAT).

  • 28.
    Daraei, Mahsa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Avelin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Evaluation of biofuel production integrated with existing CHP plants and the impacts on production planning of the system – A case study2019In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 252, article id 113461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration has caused a transformative shift in global energy systems, which is contributing to an increased use of renewables. Sweden is among the countries trying to shift to a fossil-fuel-free system in all energy sectors. This paper addresses the fuel demand and supply in the transportation sector in the county of Västmanland in Sweden. A Mixed Integer Linear Programming optimization model is developed to minimize cost in the studied system. The model is further used to investigate the influence of three different scenarios on production planning of regional Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plants: (1) straw-based biofuel production integrated with existing CHP plants to fuel combustion engine vehicles, (2) use of electric vehicles, and (3) use of hybrid vehicles fueled by both electricity and bioethanol. Potential solar power generation from rooftop solar cells is also included in the model. The energy system in scenario 2 is found to have the highest overall system efficiency; however, a large amount of power needs to be imported to the system. Hybrid vehicles can potentially reduce the electricity import and CO2 emissions compared to the current situation. Electricity production from rooftop solar collectors could provide the energy needs of the vehicles during summer, while regionally produced straw-based bioethanol integrated with CHP plants can satisfy the fuel needs of the vehicles in winter. This approach could affect the production planning of CHP plants, result in less fuel use and increase the share of renewable resources in the regional transportation system. 

  • 29.
    Daraei, Mahsa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Corrigendum to “Power-to-hydrogen storage integrated with rooftop photovoltaic systems and combined heat and power plants”. [Appl. Energy 276 (2020) 115499] (Applied Energy (2020) 276, (S0306261920310114), (10.1016/j.apenergy.2020.115499))2021In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 281, article id 116079Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors regret that there is a typo mistake in Table 3 in the paper. The value of “Hydropower” in the table was incorrectly written 831 GWh; however, it shall be 83 GWh. The revised table is as follows: The authors would like to apologize for any inconvenience caused. 

  • 30.
    Daraei, Mahsa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Power-to-hydrogen storage integrated with rooftop photovoltaic systems and combined heat and power plants2020In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 276, article id 115499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing share of intermittent renewable energy sources for power generation indicates an increasing demand for flexibility in the energy system. Energy storage technologies ensure a balance between demand and supply and increase the system flexibility. This study investigates increased application of renewable energy resources at a regional scale. Power-to-gas storage that interacts with a large-scale rooftop photovoltaic system is added to a regional energy system dominated by combined heat and power plants. The study addresses the influence of the storage system on the production planning of the combined heat and power plants and the system flexibility. The system is modeled and the product costs are optimized using the Mixed Integer Linear Programming method, as well as considering the effects on CO2 emissions and power import into the regional system. The optimization model is investigated by developing different scenarios for the capacity and cost of the storage system. The results indicate that the proposed storage system increases the system flexibility and can reduce power imports and the marginal emissions by around 53%, compared with the current energy system. There is a potential to convert a large amount of excess power to hydrogen and store it in the system. However, because of low efficiency, a fuel cell cannot significantly contribute to power regeneration from the stored hydrogen. Therefore, for about 70% of the year, the power is imported to the optimized system to compensate the power shortfalls rather than to use the fuel cell. 

  • 31.
    Desideri, U.
    et al.
    Università di Perugia.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Analysis and comparison between a concentrating solar and a photovoltaic power plant2014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 113, p. 422-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar energy is a source, which can be exploited in two main ways to generate power: direct conversion into electric energy using photovoltaic panels and by means of a thermodynamic cycle. In both cases the amount of energy, which can be converted, is changing daily and seasonally, causing a discontinuous electricity production. In order to limit this drawback, concentrated solar power plants (CSP) and photovoltaic plants (PV) can be equipped with a storage system that can be configured not only for covering peak-loads but also for the base-load after the sunset or before the sunrise. In CSP plants it is the sun's thermal energy to be stored, whereas in PV applications it is the electrical energy to be stored in batteries, although this is not economically and environmentally feasible in large-scale power plants.The main aim of this paper is to study the performance of concentrated solar power plants equipped with molten salts thermal storage to cover a base load of 3MWel. In order to verify the possibility of storing effectively the thermal energy and to design a plant for base load operation, two locations were chosen for the study: Gela in southern Italy, and Luxor in Egypt. The electricity production of the CSP facilities has been analyzed and then compared with the electricity production of PV plants. Two different comparisons were done, one by sizing the PV plant to provide the same peak power and one using the same collectors surface. This paper has also highlighted some important issues in site selection and in design criteria for CSP plants used for base load operation.The high variability of the direct normal radiation during the year in southern Italy may cause several problems in CSP facilities, mainly related to the wide range of energy input from the sun. The more uniform and higher values of the solar radiation in the Egyptian location mitigates this problem and allows achieving higher efficiencies than in southern Italy. In most cases the electricity produced by the CSP plant is higher than that produced by a similar PV plant, because the presence of the storage system guarantees the continuity of electricity production even without solar radiation. An economic analysis based on the estimation of the levelized electricity cost (LEC) for both CSP and PV power plants located both in south of Italy and Egypt was carried out in order to investigate which is the most cost effective solution. In all the cases considered, the CSP facilities resulted the best option in terms of cost of electricity produced due to the continuity of energy production during the night hours.

  • 32.
    Desideri, U
    et al.
    Univ Perugia, Italy.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Clean energy technologies and systems for a sustainable world2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 97, no SI, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Ding, Jing
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Du, Lichan
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Pan, Gechuanqi
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Lu, Jianfeng
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Wei, Xiaolan
    South China Univ Technol, Sch Chem & Chem Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Li, Jiang
    Natl Supercomp Ctr Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Weilong
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Inst Technol, Energy Proc Div, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Molecular dynamics simulations of the local structures and thermodynamic properties on molten alkali carbonate K2CO32018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 220, p. 536-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molten carbonate salts have received particular attention for high-temperature thermal energy storage and heat Molecular dynamics simulation transfer applications due to desirable thermal characteristics, such as wide operating temperature range, low Molten alkali carbonates causticity and excellent thermal stability. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed Local structures on molten alkali carbonate K2CO3 based on an effective pair potential model, a Born-Mayer type combined with Thermodynamic properties a Coulomb term. The radial distribution functions (RDF) and coordination number curves of the molten salt were characterized to explore the temperature dependences of macroscopic properties from microscopic view. The results suggest that the distance between K2CO3 particles is getting larger with temperature increasing, resulting in the increase of molar volume and the diminished ability of resistance to shear deformation and heat transfer by vibration between ions. Besides, it can be concluded that the structure of CO32- is inferred reasonably to be ortho-triangular pyramid from the comprehensive analysis of local structures including the angular distribution functions (ADF). Moreover, the thermodynamic properties were simulated in detail from 1200 to 1600 K including the density, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat capacity, sheer viscosity, thermal conductivity and ion self-diffusion coefficient, which was hard to be measured from experiments under high-temperature extreme conditions, All the simulation results are in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data with high accuracy, and the minimum simulation error is as low as 1.42%.

  • 34.
    Ding, Y.
    et al.
    College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Shao, C.
    College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Division of Energy Processes, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Song, Y.
    College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Zhang, C.
    Division of Energy Processes, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guo, C.
    College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Economical flexibility options for integrating fluctuating wind energy in power systems: The case of China2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 228, p. 426-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inherent stochastic nature of wind power requires additional flexibility during power system operation. Traditionally, conventional generation is the only option to provide the required flexibility. However, the provision of the flexibility from the conventional generation such as coal-fired generating units comes at the cost of significantly additional fuel consumption and carbon emissions. Fortunately, with the development of the technologies, energy storage and customer demand response would be able to compete with the conventional generation in providing the flexibility. Give that power systems should deploy the most economic resources for provision of the required operational flexibility, this paper presents a detailed analysis of the economic characteristics of these key flexibility options. The concept of “balancing cost” is proposed to represent the cost of utilizing the flexible resources to integrate the variable wind power. The key indicators are proposed respectively for the different flexible resources to measure the balancing cost. Moreover, the optimization models are developed to evaluate the indicators to find out the balancing costs when utilizing different flexible resources. The results illustrate that exploiting the potential of flexibility from demand side management is the preferred option for integrating variable wind power when the penetration level is below 10%, preventing additional fuel consumption and carbon emissions. However, it may require 8% of the customer demand to be flexible and available. Moreover, although energy storage is currently relatively expensive, it is likely to prevail over conventional generation by 2025 to 2030, when the capital cost of energy storage is projected to drop to approximately $ 400/kWh or lower.

  • 35.
    Du, F.
    et al.
    Department of Electronic and Electric Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Zhang, J.
    Department of Electronic and Electric Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Galloway, S.
    Department of Electronic and Electric Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Lo, K. L.
    Department of Electronic and Electric Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Modelling the impact of social network on energy savings2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 178, p. 56-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is noted that human behaviour changes can have a significant impact on energy consumption, however, qualitative study on such an impact is still very limited, and it is necessary to develop the corresponding mathematical models to describe how much energy savings can be achieved through human engagement. In this paper a mathematical model of human behavioural dynamic interactions on a social network is derived to calculate energy savings. This model consists of a weighted directed network with time evolving information on each node. Energy savings from the whole network is expressed as mathematical expectation from probability theory. This expected energy savings model includes both direct and indirect energy savings of individuals in the network. The savings model is obtained by network weights and modified by the decay of information. Expected energy savings are calculated for cases where individuals in the social network are treated as a single information source or multiple sources. This model is tested on a social network consisting of 40 people. The results show that the strength of relations between individuals is more important to information diffusion than the number of connections individuals have. The expected energy savings of optimally chosen node can be 25.32% more than randomly chosen nodes at the end of the second month for the case of single information source in the network, and 16.96% more than random nodes for the case of multiple information sources. This illustrates that the model presented in this paper can be used to determine which individuals will have the most influence on the social network, which in turn provides a useful guide to identify targeted customers in energy efficiency technology rollout programmes.

  • 36.
    Duic, Neven
    et al.
    Univ Zagreb, Croatia.
    Guzovic, Zvonimir
    Univ Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kafarov, Vyatcheslav
    Ind Univ Santander, Ctr Sustainable Dev Ind & Energy, Bucaramanga, Colombia.
    Klemes, Jiri Jaromir
    Univ Pannonia, Hungary.
    Mathiessen, Brian vad
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Sustainable development of energy, water and environment systems2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 101, p. 3-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 6th Dubrovnik Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES Conference), attended by 418 scientists from 55 countries representing six continents. It was held in 2011 and dedicated to the improvement and dissemination of knowledge on methods, policies and technologies for increasing the sustainability of development, taking into account its economic, environmental and social pillars, as well as methods for assessing and measuring sustainability of development, regarding energy, transport, water and environment systems and their many combinations.

  • 37.
    Elkadeem, M. R.
    et al.
    Electrical Power and Machines Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt.
    Younes, A.
    Geography and GIS department, Faculty of Arts, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafrelsheikh, Egypt.
    Mazzeo, D.
    Department of Mechanical, Energy and Management Engineering (DIMEG), University of Calabria, Arcavacata of Rende, Italy.
    Jurasz, J.
    Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Wrocław, Poland.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Sharshir, S. W.
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafrelsheikh, 33516, Egypt.
    Alaam, M. A.
    Electrical Power and Machines Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt.
    Geospatial-assisted multi-criterion analysis of solar and wind power geographical-technical-economic potential assessment2022In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 322, article id 119532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amid the increasing electricity demand, energy crisis and pollution, the transition to renewable energy (RE) is becoming a preoccupation and major global challenge due to the multidimensional and intricate problem of RE planning. In Egypt, about 90% of gross power generation comes from carbon-intensive power plants (natural gas and coal). Here, we propose a novel geospatial-decision-making model aimed at geographical-technical–economic potential mapping and assessment of solar photovoltaic (PV) and onshore wind turbine (WT) power plants at a high level of resolution (1 km2) in Egypt. We identify the locations suitable for PV and WT development considering sixteen restrictive and contradictory evaluation criteria. These locations have been further analyzed to estimate how much energy generation is available and at what energy cost. The analysis identifies Middle-Upper Egypt and Suez Canal as hosting the majority of highly suitable locations for PV and WT power plants, respectively. Our finding reveals that the proper planning on RE projects at the proposed optimum locations could support the country's energy mix with a sizable 32% share of the projected country's electricity consumption from PV and 50% share from WT, by 2030. Furthermore, we show that the investment opportunities of PV and WT generation are potentially attractive with affordable competitive prices estimated at 57.84 $/MWh and 32.36 $/MWh, respectively, against conventional generation for today and the future. We anticipate that our results will provide valuable support in realizing Egypt's vision for sustainable electricity generation and in keeping abreast of the global transformation in power systems being witnessed. Ultimately, the method's relevance extends beyond the geographical boundaries of the present territory; it features a strategic, clear and reproducible approach that may be applied to a larger area or continent, provided the necessary input data and criteria are introduced.

  • 38.
    Elkadeem, M. R.
    et al.
    School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan, China.
    Younes, A.
    Geography and GIS department, Faculty of Arts, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafrelsheikh 33516, Egypt.
    Sharshir, S. W.
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Kafrelsheikh University, 33516 Kafrelsheikh, Egypt.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Wang, S.
    School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan, China.
    Sustainable siting and design optimization of hybrid renewable energy system: A geospatial multi-criteria analysis2021In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 295, article id 117071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of hybrid renewable energy system (HRES) holds great promise for sustainable electrification and support countries reaching their energy access goals. The site selection and design of HRES are strategic stages towards ensuring an affordable, sustainable, and well-performing project. However, both are multidimensional and intricate issues that involve multiple conflicting assessment criteria and alternatives, which are not yet investigated comprehensively and simultaneously in many of the existing literature. In this context, the paper aims to develop a systematic and conceptual decision-making framework for site suitability and optimal design of HRESs, with an application on a regional scale in Kenya, Sub-Saharan Africa. The suggested framework is applied through three consecutive phases. First, a geographical information system (GIS) is combined with Best Worst Method (BWM) decision-making approach to spatially investigate and analyze the potential sites of solar, wind, and hybrid solar/wind systems. Within the spatial investigation, 9 different climatology, environment, location, and orography criteria are considered. Second, energy-economy-ecology (E3) design optimization is conducted to determine the list of feasible alternatives among grid-extension, autonomous HRES, and stand-alone diesel genset electrification schemes for powering a representative remote rural village in Kenya. Third, a post-optimality multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) analysis is applied to decide and assess the optimal energy access design against 12 key sustainability indicators. In the third phase, the BWM is employed to define the weights of each indicator. Then, the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and the VIšekriterijumsko KOmpromisno Rangiranje (VIKOR) decision making approaches are used for the final ranking of feasible alternatives. The obtained site suitability maps of Kenya show that 0.91% (5322 km2) and 1.5% (8828.4 km2) of the land is highly suitable, 10.25% (59687 km2) and 33.04% (192360 km2) is suitable, and 80.5% (470313 km2) and 65% (378407 km2) is permanently unsuitable for establishing solar and wind systems, respectively. Also, E3-MCDM results indicate that the development of solar/wind/diesel/battery HRES is the best sustainable solution to supply the studied region as compared to other feasible alternatives. The system does not only guarantee a reliable operation with an unmet load of 552 kWh/yr, but it also has the lowest net present and energy costs at 2.6 M$ and 0.28 $/kWh, respectively, meanwhile avoiding annual CO2 of 804 tons compared with diesel system.

  • 39.
    Elkadeem, M. R.
    et al.
    Interdisciplinary Research Center for Renewable Energy and Power Systems (IRC-REPS), King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.
    Zainali, Sebastian
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Lu, Silvia Ma
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Younes, A.
    Geography and GIS Department, Faculty of Arts, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafrelsheikh, Egypt.
    Abido, M. A.
    SDAIA-KFUPM Joint Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.
    Amaducci, S.
    Department of Sustainable Crop Production, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza, Italy.
    Croci, M.
    Department of Sustainable Crop Production, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza, Italy.
    Zhang, J.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landelius, T.
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Stridh, Bengt
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Agrivoltaic systems potentials in Sweden: A geospatial-assisted multi-criteria analysis2024In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 356, article id 122108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agrivoltaic systems represent an intelligent solution combining electricity production from solar photovoltaic technology with agricultural production to avoid land use conflicts. Geographic Information System technologies can support the implementation and spread of agrivoltaic systems by identifying the most suitable areas using useful spatially explicit information concerning techno-agro-socio-economic criteria. In this study, we have developed a procedure to identify and classify suitable areas for agrivoltaic systems in Sweden. An Ordinal Priority Approach based multi-criteria decision-making algorithm is established to calculate the weights of the selected evaluation criteria through expert interviews. The land use data refers to the Corine Land Cover 2018 product. The results show that about 8.6% of the Swedish territory, approximately 38,485 km2, is suitable for installing agrivoltaic systems. Among this area, about 0.2% is classified as “excellent”, about 15% as “very good”, about 72% as “good”, about 13% as “moderate”, and about 0.1% as “poor”. Most “excellent”-classified areas are in Kalmar, Skåne, and Gotland. In contrast, most “very good” sites are in Skåne, Kalmar, and Östergötland. By deploying vertically mounted agrivoltaic systems with bifacial photovoltaic modules, the total potential installed capacity for “excellent” areas is about 2.5 GWp, while for areas classified “excellent” and “very good” is about 221 GWp. The total “excellent” areas can potentially supply about 2.4 TWh of electricity against the electricity consumption in 2021 of about 143 TWh. On the other hand, the land classified as “excellent” and “very good” could potentially provide about 207 TWh. The County of Västra Götaland shows the greatest potentials in terms of total potential electricity supply from agrivoltaic systems with about 227 TWh, followed by Skåne with a total potential of 206 TWh. 

  • 40.
    Epple, B.
    et al.
    Technische Universität Darmstadt.
    Lyngfelt, A.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Adanez, J.
    Department of Energy and Environment, Miguel Luesma Castán .
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    The 2nd International Conference on Chemical Looping 20122014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 113, p. 1827-1829Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Feng, J. -C
    et al.
    School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 42, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yu, Z.
    School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Zeng, X.
    School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Xu, W.
    School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Case study of an industrial park toward zero carbon emission2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 209, p. 65-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial park shoulders heavy responsibilities for economic development, and in the meantime, acts the role as energy consumer and carbon emitter. Under the background of holding the average global temperature increase limited in 2 °C compared to the pre-industrial level, which was proposed in the Paris Agreement, the development of zero carbon emission at the industrial park level is of great importance. This study investigated how to realize zero carbon emission at an industrial park level. In addition, a practical case study of the Southern China Traditional Chinese Medicine Industrial Park located in the Zhongshan City, Guangdong Province of China was conducted. Scenario analyses were projected to realize zero carbon emission in this industrial park and the results show that zero carbon emission can be realized under all the three scenarios. Economic assessments found that purchasing carbon offsets get the minimum cost effectiveness under current market situation. However, purchasing carbon offset may not be the best choice from the aspect of absolute reduction. Sensitivity analyses illustrate that the cost effectiveness of carbon reduction is remarkably influenced by the carbon price and solar energy cost reduction ratio. Meanwhile, applying large-scale renewable energy and producing more carbon offset can harvest more economic and carbon reduction benefits when the current solar energy cost has been reduced by 90%. Moreover, challenges of building zero-carbon industrial park as well as the corresponding solution schemes were discussed.

  • 42.
    Gao, Shuang
    et al.
    School of Business, Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden;School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Tianjin University, China.
    Jurasz, J.
    Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Wrocław, Poland.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Corsetti, E.
    Generation Technologies and Materials Department, RSE, Milan, Italy.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Potential benefits from participating in day-ahead and regulation markets for CHPs2022In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 306, no A, article id 117974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A combined heat and power plant (CHP) has the ability to provide ancillary services and therefore, can contribute to the improvement of flexibility and reliability of the power system. To motivate CHPs to provide flexibility services, this work investigated the potential benefit for CHPs from participating simultaneously in day-ahead and frequency regulation markets. A new CHP model was proposed, which considers both heat recovery from flue gas condensation and thermal energy storage. Based on the multi-market optimization using real market prices, it can be concluded that providing the frequency regulation service in addition to day-ahead trading can increase the annual profit of CHPs, which was 2.75% for the studied CHP. Meanwhile, the benefit was clearly affected by the heat demand as both high and low heat demand seasons (e.g. in winter and summer) can limit the flexibility provided by the CHP. In addition, the sensitivity analysis was carried out to assess the impacts of key factors, including electricity price, heat demand, cost of electricity, and bid size for frequency reserve services, on the benefit from the participation in both markets. The price difference between the day-ahead and frequency regulation markets and the cost of electricity generation were found to have clear impacts on the benefit of the CHP. 

  • 43.
    Gao, Shuang
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Tianjin University, China.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hou, Y.
    School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Tianjin University, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Benefits of integrating power-to-heat assets in CHPs2023In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 335, article id 120763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating power-to-heat (P2H) assets in combined heat and power plants (CHPs) is an attractive option, which can improve the flexibility in CHPs. This paper compares the potential benefits of integrating an electrical boiler (EB) and a heat pump (HP) in a CHP from providing flexibility services in both the day-ahead market and the frequency regulation market. An optimization model is developed for the operation of P2H assets and the CHP to maximize the profit. A case study is carried out using the data of a real CHP and electricity prices of Nord Pool. It is found that when an EB or a HP is integrated, the annual profit of the studied CHP from providing frequency regulation can be increased by 3.1 % (EB) or 27.7 % (HP) respectively compared to the CHP without P2H. Despite the high capital cost, a HP can increase the net present value up to 21.8 %, and achieve a payback period of 3 year, which are better than an EB (0.8 % and 5 year). Sensitivity analysis shows that prices of fuel and electricity have significant impacts on the net present value and payback period for the integration of P2H assets. Even though the increase of the fuel price decreases the NPV, it can lead to a decline in the payback period. Meanwhile, the increase of the electricity price results in a large growth in the profit and NPV, but a big reduction in payback period. 

  • 44.
    Geng, Y.
    et al.
    Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China .
    Wei, Y. -M
    Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China.
    Fischedick, M.
    Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment, Germany.
    Chiu, A.
    De La Salle University, Philippines .
    Chen, B.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Recent trend of industrial emissions in developing countries2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 166, p. 187-190Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from industrial sectors are increasing, particularly in the developing world where pursuing industrialization has been highly addressed. This calls for further studies to learn and share experiences for developing countries. In order to fill in such a research gap, this special issue focuses on examining the recent trend of industrial emissions in developing countries. Among the manuscripts submitted to the Special Issue, twelve papers have been accepted after review, covering assessment indicators, tools and methods, and policies. Key industrial sectors, including cement, lime, aluminum, coal, mining, glass, soda ash, etc, have been investigated. Valuable policy insights have been raised, including wide scale upgrading, replacement and deployment of best available technologies, integrated information platforms, cross-cutting technologies and measures, a shift to low carbon electricity, radical product innovations, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), demand on new and replacement products, systematic approaches and collaboration among different industries. These useful suggestions could be shared or learned by industrial policy makers or managers in the developing world so that the overall GHG emissions from their industrial sectors can be mitigated by considering the local realities.

  • 45.
    Goldberg, C.
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.
    Nalianda, D.
    Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.
    Sethi, V.
    Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.
    Pilidis, P.
    Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.
    Singh, R.
    Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Assessment of an energy-efficient aircraft concept from a techno-economic perspective2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 221, p. 229-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increase in environmental awareness in both the aviation industry and the wider global setting has led to large bodies of research dedicated to developing more sustainable technology with a lower environmental impact and lower energy usage. The goal of reducing environmental impact has necessitated research into revolutionary new technologies that have the potential to be significantly more energy efficient than their predecessors. However, for innovative technologies in any industry, there is a risk that adoption will be prohibitively expensive for commercial application. It is therefore important to model the economic factors of the new technology or policy at an early stage of development. This research demonstrates the application of a Techno-economic Environmental Risk Assessment framework that may be used to identify the economic impact of an energy-efficient aircraft concept and the impact that environmental policy would have on the viability of the concept. The framework has been applied to a case study aircraft designed to achieve an energy saving of 60% in comparison to a baseline 2005 entry-into-service aircraft. The model compares the green aircraft concept to a baseline conventional aircraft using a sensitivity analysis of the aircraft direct operating cost to changes in acquisition and maintenance cost. The research illustrates an economically viable region for the technology. Cost margins are identified where the increase in operating cost due to expensive novel technology is counterbalanced by the reduction in cost resulting from low energy consumption. Viability was found to be closely linked to fuel price, with a low fuel price limiting the viability of energy-efficient aviation technology. In contrast, a change in environmental taxation policy was found to be beneficial, with the introduction of carbon taxation incentivising the use of an environmentally optimised aircraft.

  • 46.
    Gorjian, Shiva
    et al.
    Biosystems Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Tarbiat Modares University (TMU), Tehran, Iran; Renewable Energy Department, Faculty of Interdisciplinary Science & Technology, Tarbiat Modares University (TMU), Tehran, Iran.
    Jalili Jamshidian, Farid
    Water Resources Management and Engineering, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University (TMU), Tehran, Iran.
    Gorjian, Alireza
    Electrical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, 6516738695, Iran.
    Faridi, Hamideh
    Biosystems Engineering Department, University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Vafaei, Mohammad
    Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran.
    Zhang, Fangxin
    Optic and Optical Engineering Department, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), Hefei City, China.
    Liu, Wen
    Optic and Optical Engineering Department, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), Hefei City, China.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Technological advancements and research prospects of innovative concentrating agrivoltaics2023In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 337, article id 120799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agrivoltaic is a strategic and innovative approach that combines photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion with agricultural production, enabling synergies in the production of food, energy, and water, as well as the preservation of the ecological landscape. Shading management, intensity adjustment, and spectral distribution allow innovative PV systems to generate significant amounts of electricity without affecting agricultural production. Demonstration projects have already been developed around the world and there is a wealth of experience with various design solutions for commercial use. One of these new technologies is concentrator photovoltaics (CPV). The CPV has excellent spectral processing capabilities and highly concentrated power generation efficiency, which makes it a perfect solution for integrating with photosynthesis. This study aims to present the working principle of CPV modules considering agricultural applications and discuss the recent advancements in concentrating agrivoltaics. In this method, the problem of shading is mitigated by two main strategies: (i) parabolic glasses covered with a multilayer dichroic polymer film that reflects near-infrared (NIR) radiation onto the solar cells installed at the focal area and transmits photons in the range of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and (ii) highly transparent sun-tracking louvers or Fresnel lenses that concentrate direct sunlight onto the solar cells to generate electricity. In the latter solution, the remaining diffuse sunlight is directed to the ground for use by growing plants. Although the CPV development trend has been slow due to the lower cost of crystalline silicon, the development of CPV for agriculture with accurate spectral separation could revitalize this industry. In this regard, more research and development are needed to evaluate the suitability of materials that split solar radiation and their impacts on the electrical performance of CPV modules, taking into account the physiology of plants.

  • 47.
    Guo, S.
    et al.
    Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou, China.
    Zhao, J.
    Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
    Wang, W.
    Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jin, G.
    Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou, China.
    Zhang, Z.
    Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou, China.
    Gu, J.
    Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou, China.
    Niu, Y.
    Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou, China.
    Numerical study of the improvement of an indirect contact mobilized thermal energy storage container2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 161, p. 476-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the melting and solidification behaviours of the PCM in an indirect contact mobilized thermal energy storage (ICM-TES) container were numerically investigated to facilitate the further understanding of the phase change mechanism in the container. A 2D model was built based on the simplification and assumptions of experiments, which were validated by comparing the results of computations and measurements. Then, three options, i.e., a high thermal conductivity material (expanded graphite) addition, the tube diameter and the adjustment of the internal structure of the container and fin installation, were analyzed to seek effective approaches for the improvement of the ICM-TES performance. The results show that the optimal parameters of the three options are 10vol.% (expanded graphite proportion), 22mm (tube diameter) and 0.468m2 (fin area). When the three options are applied simultaneously, the charging time is reduced by approximately 74% and the discharging time by 67%.

  • 48.
    Guo, Shaopeng
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Zhao, J.
    Tianjin University, China .
    Li, Xun
    Tianjin University, China .
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Numerical simulation study on optimizing charging process of the direct contact mobilized thermal energy storage2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 112, p. 1416-1423Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobilized thermal energy storage (M-TES) system is considered as an attractive alternative to supply heat to distributed heat users, especially when the waste heat from industries is used as a heat source. From our previous study it was known that the charging time of M-TES system was more than four times of the discharging time, which was a critical issue for the application of M-TES. To improve the charging performance of the system and further understand the mechanism of melting process, a 2-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation model was developed in ANSYS FLUENT. The model was validated by the experimental measurements. The results showed that the model could be used for the engineering analysis. With the validated model, different options to shorten the charging time were investigated including increasing flow rate of thermal oil, creating channels before charging and adding wall heating. Correspondingly, around 25%, 26% and 29% of the charging time could be reduced respectively compared to the experiment with a thermal oil flow rate of 9.8 L/min, according to the numerical simulation. In addition, if the last two options could be applied simultaneously, more than half of the melting time might be shortened without changing the flow rate of thermal oil. 

  • 49.
    Guo, Shaopeng
    et al.
    Inner Mongolia Univ Sci & Technol, China.
    Zhao, Jun
    Tianjin Univ, China..
    Wang, Weilong
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, China..
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Jin, Guang
    Inner Mongolia Univ Sci & Technol, China..
    Wang, Xiaotong
    Inner Mongolia Univ Sci & Technol, China..
    Techno-economic assessment of mobilized thermal energy storage for distributed users: A case study in China2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 194, p. 481-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mobilized thermal energy storage (M-TES) system is a promising alternative to conventional heating systems to meet the heat demand for distributed users. This paper provided a techno-economic assessment of the M-TES system based on a case study in China. According to the analysis of the design specifications of the heating system, the suitability of matching the M-TES with existing heating systems was analyzed. The results show that the M-TES is appropriate for use with heating systems with a fan-coil unit and under-floor pipe. Containers and operating strategies for the M-TES with different transportation schemes were also designed. The maximum allowed load of the M-TES container is 39 t according to the discussion of transportation regulations on the road. The cost and income of the M-TES in the study case were estimated, and the net present value (NPV) and payback period (PBP) were also calculated. The best operating strategy is the use of 2 containers and 4 cycles of container transportation per day, with a PBP of approximately 10 years. The M-TES is applicable for middle and small-scale heat users in China. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Gustafsson, M.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Swing Gustafsson, Moa
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Myhren, J. A.
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Bales, C.
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Holmberg, S.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Techno-economic analysis of energy renovation measures for a district heated multi-family house2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 177, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Renovation of existing buildings is important in the work toward increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. The present paper treats energy renovation measures for a Swedish district heated multi-family house, evaluated through dynamic simulation. Insulation of roof and façade, better insulating windows and flow-reducing water taps, in combination with different HVAC systems for recovery of heat from exhaust air, were assessed in terms of life cycle cost, discounted payback period, primary energy consumption, CO2 emissions and non-renewable energy consumption. The HVAC systems were based on the existing district heating substation and included mechanical ventilation with heat recovery and different configurations of exhaust air heat pump.Compared to a renovation without energy saving measures, the combination of new windows, insulation, flow-reducing taps and an exhaust air a heat pump gave up to 24% lower life cycle cost. Adding insulation on roof and façade, the primary energy consumption was reduced by up to 58%, CO2 emissions up to 65% and non-renewable energy consumption up to 56%. Ventilation with heat recovery also reduced the environmental impact but was not economically profitable in the studied cases. With a margin perspective on electricity consumption, the environmental impact of installing heat pumps or air heat recovery in district heated houses is increased. Low-temperature heating improved the seasonal performance factor of the heat pump by up to 11% and reduced the environmental impact. 

123456 1 - 50 of 270
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf