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  • 1.
    Danish, M.
    et al.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China .
    Gu, X.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China .
    Lu, S.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China .
    Ahmad, A.
    Muhammad Nawaz Sharif University of Engineering and Technology, Multan, Pakistan.
    Naqvi, Muhammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Farooq, U.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China .
    Zhang, X.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China .
    Fu, X.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China .
    Miao, Z.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China .
    Xue, Y.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China .
    Efficient transformation of trichloroethylene activated through sodium percarbonate using heterogeneous zeolite supported nano zero valent iron-copper bimetallic composite2017In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 308, p. 396-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zeolite supported nano zero valent iron copper bimetallic composite (Z-nZVFe-Cu) was synthesized using an ion exchange method. The morphology and physico-chemical properties of the Z-nZVFe-Cu composite were determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET), energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The results showed that iron and copper nano particles were well dispersed on the zeolite sheet. The degradation efficiency of trichloroethylene (TCE) achieved was more than 95% using Z-nZVFe-Cu as a heterogeneous Fenton like catalyst. An efficient removal of total organic carbon (TOC) was promoted as compared to zeolite supported iron nano composite (Z-nZVFe) and unsupported nano iron (nZVFe). Electron spin resonance (ESR) detection confirmed the intensity of hydroxyl radicals (OH[rad]) in the system. While benzoic acid (BA), a probe indicator for the quantification of OH[rad], demonstrated the higher intensity of hydroxyl radicals in Z-nZVFe-Cu as compared to Z-nZVFe and nZVFe. The less iron and copper leaching of from Z-nZVFe-Cu presented its higher stability and better catalytic activity, displaying its potential long term applications for TCE degradation in groundwater. 

  • 2.
    Farooq, U.
    et al.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China.
    Danish, M.
    University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Faisalabad Campus, Pakistan.
    Lu, S.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China.
    Naqvi, Muhammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Qiu, Z.
    East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China.
    Sui, Q.
    Shanghai Institute of Pollution Control and Ecological Security, Shanghai, China.
    A step forward towards synthesizing a stable and regeneratable nanocomposite for remediation of trichloroethene2018In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 347, p. 660-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthesizing supported heterogeneous catalysts is always considered as a persistent approach for degradation of contaminants. However, the stability of these nanocomposites and improvement of process conditions influencing target pollutants degradation are still limited. Herein, on the basis of self-adhesive nature of polydopamine (PDA) and its strong electrostatic interaction with metallic ions, we synthesized a facile, stable, magnetically separable, and environmentally benign PDA decorated, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) supported Fe nanocatalyst (PDA@Fe/rGO). The effects of process variables (pH, PDA@Fe/rGO, and persulphate (PS) dose) on the degradation performance of trichloroethene (TCE), a model chlorinated organic pollutant selected in this study, were investigated. PDA not only encapsulated the host Fe/rGO magnetic particles but also exhibited high magnetization. PDA wrapping tremendously enhanced the thermal stability of nanocatalyst with just 24.1% weight loss at elevated temperature compared to solo Fe/rGO (40.2%). Moreover, TCE degradation mechanism was interpreted by ESR and radical scavenger tests, validating OH[rad], SO4 [rad]− and O2 [rad]− radicals being responsible for TCE degradation. Considering its eminent catalytic activity, simple synthesis approach and excellent kinetics, this recyclable and improved PDA assisted Fe/rGO nanocatalyst further opens a door for practical implementation in the field of contaminated groundwater remediation. 

  • 3.
    Punzi, M.
    et al.
    Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Anbalagan, Anbarasan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Aragão Börner, R.
    Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Svensson, B. -M
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden .
    Jonstrup, M.
    Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; VA SYD, Malmö, Sweden .
    Mattiasson, B.
    Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Degradation of a textile azo dye using biological treatment followed by photo-Fenton oxidation: Evaluation of toxicity and microbial community structure2015In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 270, p. 290-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many commercial dye preparations are cocktails of active dyes and various by-products that are recalcitrant to biological degradation and end up in significant amounts in the effluent after the dyeing process. Conventional wastewater treatment processes are not able to degrade such compounds and detoxify the effluent, thus alternative treatments should be developed.In our work we suggest to use photo-Fenton oxidation as post-treatment after an anaerobic biofilm process, in a way to minimize the reagents needed. This process was used for treatment of synthetic textile wastewater containing the commercial azo dyestuff Remazol Red, starch and sodium chloride. The treated textile effluent had COD lower than 18. mg/l even when using initial Fenton reagents concentration as low as 1. mM ferrous ions and 10. mM hydrogen peroxide. The acute toxicity was higher in the biologically treated than in the untreated effluent. Photo-Fenton oxidation successfully reduced the toxicity and the final effluent was non-toxic to Artemia salina and Microtox, with the exception of the effluent containing high concentration of sodium chloride, which was moderately toxic to Microtox. For the first time the presence of algae was detected in a reactor treating textile wastewater using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE); bacteria and fungi were also abundant.The results of this study suggest that using advanced oxidation after biological treatment is an effective way to degrade the organic compounds and remove toxicity from textile effluents.

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