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  • 1.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Cranfield University, UK.
    Grönstedt, Tomas
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Barbosa, Joao R.
    Instituto Technológico de Aeronáutica, São José dos Campos, Brazil.
    Lessons Learned From the Development of Courses on Gas Turbine Multidisciplinary Conceptual Design2013In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 135, no 7, p. Article number 072601-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the need for highly qualified experts, multidisciplinary gas turbine conceptual design has not been a common study topic in traditional postgraduate curriculums. Although many courses on specialized topics in gas turbine technology take place, limited attention is given on connecting these individual topics to the overall engine design process. Teaching conceptual design as part of a postgraduate curriculum, or as an intensive short course, may help to address the industrial need for engineers with early qualifications on the topic, i.e., prior to starting their careers in the gas turbine industry. This paper presents details and lessons learned from: (i) the integration of different elements of conceptual design in an existing traditional Master of Science (MSc) course on gas turbine technology through the introduction of group design tasks and (ii) the development of an intensive course on gas turbine multidisciplinary conceptual design as a result of an international cooperation between academia and industry. Within the latter course, the students were grouped in competing teams and were asked to produce their own gas turbine conceptual design proposals within a given set of functional requirements. The main concept behind the development of the new design tasks, and the new intensive course, has been to effectively mimic the dynamics of small conceptual design teams, as often encountered in industry. The results presented are very encouraging in terms of enhancing student learning and developing engineering skills.

  • 2.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Cranfield University, UK.
    Rolt, Andrew
    Rolls-Royce plc, UK.
    Grönstedt, Tomas
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Multidisciplinary Analysis of a Geared Fan Intercooled Core Aero-Engine2014In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 136, no 1, p. Article number 011203-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reduction of CO2 emissions is strongly linked with the improvement of engine specific fuel consumption, along with the reduction of engine nacelle drag and weight. One alternative design approach to improving specific fuel consumption is to consider a geared fan combined with an increased overall pressure ratio intercooled core performance cycle. The thermal benefits from intercooling have been well documented in the literature. Nevertheless, there is very little information available in the public domain with respect to design space exploration of such an engine concept when combined with a geared fan. The present work uses a multidisciplinary conceptual design tool to analyze the option of an intercooled core geared fan aero engine for long haul applications with a 2020 entry into service technology level assumption. With minimum mission fuel in mind, the results indicate as optimal values a pressure ratio split exponent of 0.38 and an intercooler mass flow ratio of 1.18 at hot-day top of climb conditions. At ISA midcruise conditions a specific thrust of 86 m/s, a jet velocity ratio of 0.83, an intercooler effectiveness of 56%, and an overall pressure ratio value of 76 are likely to be a good choice. A 70,000 lbf intercooled turbofan engine is large enough to make efficient use of an all-axial compression system, particularly within a geared fan configuration, but intercooling is perhaps more likely to be applied to even larger engines. The proposed optimal jet velocity ratio is actually higher than the value one would expect by using standard analytical expressions, primarily because this design variable affects core efficiency at mid-cruise due to a combination of several different subtle changes to the core cycle and core component efficiencies at this condition. The analytical expressions do not consider changes in core efficiency and the beneficial effect of intercooling on transfer efficiency, nor do they account for losses in the bypass duct and jet pipe, while a relatively detailed engine performance model, such as the one utilized in this study, does. Mission fuel results from a surrogate model are in good agreement with the results obtained from a rubberized-wing aircraft model for some of the design parameters. This indicates that it is possible to replace an aircraft model with specific fuel consumption and weight penalty exchange rates. Nevertheless, drag count exchange rates have to be utilized to properly assess changes in mission fuel for those design parameters that affect nacelle diameter.

  • 3.
    Luque, Salvador
    et al.
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Kanjirakkad, Vasudevan
    University of Sussex, United Kingdom.
    Aslanidou, Ioanna
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Lubbock, Roderick
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Rosic, Budimir
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Uchida, Sumiu
    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Japan.
    A New Experimental Facility to Investigate Combustor-Turbine Interactions in Gas Turbines With Multiple Can Combustors2015In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 137, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a new modular experimental facility that was purpose-built to investigateflow interactions between the combustor and first stage nozzle guide vanes (NGVs)of heavy duty power generation gas turbines with multiple can combustors. The first stageturbine NGV is subjected to the highest thermal loads of all turbine components andtherefore consumes a proportionally large amount of cooling air that contributes detrimentallyto the stage and cycle efficiency. It has become necessary to devise novel coolingconcepts that can substantially reduce the coolant air requirement but still allow theturbine to maintain its aerothermal performance. The present work aims to aid this objectiveby the design and commissioning of a high-speed linear cascade, which consists oftwo can combustor transition ducts and four first stage NGVs. This is a modular nonreactiveair test platform with engine realistic geometries (gas path and near gas path), coolingsystem, and boundary conditions (inlet swirl, turbulence level, and boundary layer).The paper presents the various design aspects of the high pressure (HP) blow down typefacility, and the initial results from a wide range of aerodynamic and heat transfermeasurements under highly engine realistic conditions.

  • 4.
    Rahman, Moksadur
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anders, Malmquist
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Modeling and Simulation of an Externally Fired Micro-Gas Turbine for Standalone Polygeneration Application2016In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 138, no 11, article id 112301Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Rossi, I.
    et al.
    University of Genoa, Genova, Italy.
    Zaccaria, Valentina
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Traverso, A.
    University of Genoa, Genova, Italy.
    Advanced Control for Clusters of SOFC/Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems2018In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 140, no 5, article id 051703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of model predictive control (MPC) in advanced power systems can be advantageous in controlling highly coupled variables and optimizing system operations. Solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrids are an example where advanced control techniques can be effectively applied. For example, to manage load distribution among several identical generation units characterized by different temperature distributions due to different degradation paths of the fuel cell stacks. When implementing an MPC, a critical aspect is the trade-off between model accuracy and simplicity, the latter related to a fast computational time. In this work, a hybrid physical and numerical approach was used to reduce the number of states necessary to describe such complex target system. The reduced number of states in the model and the simple framework allow real-time performance and potential extension to a wide range of power plants for industrial application, at the expense of accuracy losses, discussed in the paper. 

  • 6.
    Zaccaria, Valentina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Ferrari, Mario
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Adaptive Control of Micro Gas Turbine for Engine Degradation Compensation2019In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Zachos, Pavlos K.
    et al.
    Cranfield University, United Kingdom.
    Aslanidou, Ioanna
    Cranfield University, United Kingdom.
    Pachidis, Vassilios
    Cranfield University, United Kingdom.
    Singh, Riti
    Cranfield University, United Kingdom.
    A sub-idle compressor characteristic generation method with enhanced physical background2011In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 133, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sub-idle is a very challenging operating region as the performance of a gas turbineengine changes significantly compared with design conditions. In addition, the regulationsfor new and existing engines are becoming stricter and the prediction of enginerelight capability is essential. In order to predict the performance of an engine, detailedcomponent maps are required. The data obtained from rig tests are insufficient at lowspeeds, creating the need for generation of maps within the sub-idle regime. The first steptoward this direction is the use of an extrapolation process. This is a purely mathematicalprocess and the results are not usually of sufficient accuracy. In addition, this methoddoes not provide any insight on the physical phenomena governing the operation of thecompressor at low speeds. The accuracy of the resulting compressor map can be increasedwith a better low speed region definition; this can be achieved via the thoroughstudy of a locked rotor compressor, enabling the derivation of the zero rotational speedline and allowing an interpolation process for the generation of the low speed part of thecharacteristic. In this work, an enhanced sub-idle compressor map generation techniqueis proposed. The suggested methodology enables the generation of characteristics at faroff-design conditions with enhanced physical background. Alternative parameters formap representation are also introduced. Provided that the all the blade rows of thecompressor are of known geometry, a numerical analysis is used for the calculation of thecharacteristic of the half stage and a stage stacking method is employed to create theentire compressor characteristic. This way, the sub-idle region of the map can be calculatedthrough interpolation, which provides a more accurate and predictive technique.Application of the method for compressor map generation showed that the proposedinterpolation approach is robust and capable of enhancing any performance simulationtool used for the prediction of transient altitude relight or ground-starting maneuvers.

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