https://www.mdu.se/

mdu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Guo, Yangyi
    et al.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Precision Instruments and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, China.
    He, Xiaohe
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Precision Instruments and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, China.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Liu, Bin
    Tianjin Key Laboratory of Refrigeration Technology, Tianjin University of Commerce, China.
    Liu, Shengchun
    Tianjin Key Laboratory of Refrigeration Technology, Tianjin University of Commerce, China.
    Qi, Hongzhi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Precision Instruments and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, China; Academy of Medical Engineering and Translational Medicine, Tianjin University, China.
    The use of the general thermal sensation discriminant model based on CNN for room temperature regulation by online brain-computer interface2023In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 241, article id 110494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology can realize dynamic room temperature adjustment based on individual real-time thermal sensation, which can provide the basis for future intelligent buildings. However, the generalization ability of previous thermal sensation discrimination model (TSDM) is limited, which is a serious obstacle to the application. In this paper, a general TSDM was developed by using convolutional neural network (CNN), which can be well applied to new subjects. In the study, the CNN-TSDM was established and evaluated based on the offline experimental data, and then the BCI closed-loop online room temperature control experiment was carried out based on this CNN-TSDM to further verify. The offline analysis results show that the recognition performance of CNN-TSDM in new subjects is significantly higher than that of typical shallow learning algorithms, and its area under the ROC curve (AUC) value reaches 0.789. In the online experiments of the two simulated environments, BCI using the CNN-TSDM dynamically controlled the air conditioning to improve the room temperature to the comfortable level according to the subjects' thermal sensation. The subjective score of subjects decreased from 3.1 to 3.0 for the hot uncomfortable to 1.1 and 1.2 for the cool comfortable (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Moreover, in a hotter simulated experimental environment, BCI automatically controlled the air conditioner for longer cooling to obtain a same degree of thermal comfort. The total cooling time (p < 0.05) and the single cooling time (p < 0.05) of the air conditioner were significantly increased. This further confirmed the effectiveness and robustness of the general CNN-TSDM.

  • 2.
    Hu, N.
    et al.
    Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Lans, J.
    Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands. Reinier de Graaf Hospital, Delft, Netherlands.
    Gram, A.
    Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Luscuere, P.
    Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Sadrizadeh, Sasan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ventilation performance evaluation of an operating room with temperature-controlled airflow system in contaminant control: A numerical study2024In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 259, article id 111619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the efficacy of temperature-controlled airflow systems in modern operating rooms for contaminant control, a critical factor in preventing surgical site infections. We have conducted experimental measurements in an operating room equipped with temperature-controlled ventilation to map the airflow field and contaminant dispersion (airborne particles with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 1 μm). The results were used to validate the computational fluid dynamics code, which was then employed to simulate and examine different conditions, including contaminant release locations and air supply rates. Realizable k-epsilon and passive scalar models were utilized to simulate airflow and airborne particle phases. We assessed the airflow distribution and contaminant dispersion, utilizing indices such as ventilation and air change efficiency scales. The analysis provided quantitative insights into the distribution and removal of contaminants, as well as the speed at which the room air was replaced. Contamination was found to be effectively reduced when contaminants were released near exhaust outlets or under central unidirectional inlets. The presence of the operating table caused a big distortion of the central downward airflow, forming a horizontal air barrier at the periphery. Under this unique interior configuration, an appropriate air supply ratio between central and periphery zones was required to achieve optimal overall ventilation performance.

  • 3.
    Hu, N.
    et al.
    Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yuan, F.
    Joint International Research Laboratory of Green Buildings and Built Environments (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University, Chongqing, China.
    Gram, A.
    Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yao, R.
    Joint International Research Laboratory of Green Buildings and Built Environments (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; National Centre for International Research of Low-Carbon and Green Buildings (Ministry of Science and Technology), Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; School of the Built Environment, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom.
    Sadrizadeh, Sasan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Review of experimental measurements on particle size distribution and airflow behaviors during human respiration2024In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 247, article id 110994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, pandemic outbreaks have raised concerns about the spread of respiratory infections and their impact on public health. Since the pathogen emission during human respiration is recognized as the primary source, characterizing the physical properties of exhaled particles and airflow has become a crucial focus of attention. This article critically reviews experimental studies in exhaled particles and airflow, examines the uncertainty introduced by different measurement methods, analyzes how it is reflected in measurement outcomes, and provides an in-depth understanding of particle size distribution and airflow behaviors of human respiration. The measurement techniques assessment highlights the variability among particle sizing techniques in detection size range, collection efficiency, hydration status of captured particles, and experimental protocols. A combination of sampling-based instruments and laser imaging systems is recommended for particle sizing to cover a wider detection range, with refined setups in thermal conditions, sampling distance, volume, and duration. Meanwhile, it identifies the complementary nature of qualitative and quantitative measurements of airflow characterization techniques. Image recording systems plus data reconstruction programs are suggested to capture dynamic airflow features while accuracy validation by other techniques is required at the same time. Subsequent analysis of the measurement data showed that the various experimental measurements provided substantial information, but they also revealed disagreements and challenges in quantification. The dominance of submicron aerosols in exhaled particles and jet-like transport in exhaled airflow is obvious. More efforts should be made to measure particles larger than 20 μm, capture airflow dynamics in a high temporal and spatial resolution, and quantify the impact of face coverings to improve the understanding of human respiratory emissions.

  • 4.
    Nourozi, B.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Wierzbicka, A.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Yao, R.
    Chongqing University, Chongqing, China.
    Sadrizadeh, Sasan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    A systematic review of ventilation solutions for hospital wards: Addressing cross-infection and patient safety2024In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 247, article id 110954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite various preventive interventions, nosocomial cross-infection remains a significant challenge in healthcare facilities worldwide. Consequently, prolonged hospitalization, elevated healthcare costs, and mortality rates are major concerns. Proper ventilation has been identified as one of the possible interventions for reducing the risk of cross-infection between patients and healthcare workers in hospital wards by diluting infectious agents and their carrying particles. The use of air cleaners in conjunction with the ventilation system further reduces the concentration of indoor pathogens. This article presents a systematic review of the ventilation solutions employed in hospital wards where pathogen removal performance can be enhanced using air-cleaning techniques while maintaining the thermal comfort of patients and healthcare staff. We provide a comparative analysis of the performance of different ventilation strategies adopted in one-, two-, or multi-bed hospital wards. Additionally, we discuss the parameters that influence the aerosol removal efficiency of ventilation systems and review various air-cleaning technologies that can further complement the ventilation system to reduce contaminant concentrations. Finally, we review and discuss the impact of different ventilation strategies on the perceived thermal comfort of patients and healthcare workers. This study provides insights into the cross-contamination risks associated with various hospital ward setups and the vital role of the ventilation system in reducing the adverse effects of infection risk. The findings of this review will contribute to the development of effective ventilation solutions that ensure improved patient outcomes and the well-being of healthcare workers.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf