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  • 1.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping.
    Granlund, Mats
    Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication. Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping.
    Engagement in family activities: A quantitative, comparative study of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and children with typical development2013In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 523-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Participation is known to be of great importance for children's development and emotional well-being as well as for their families. In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth version participation is defined as a person's 'involvement in a life situation'. Engagement is closely related to involvement and can be seen as expressions of involvement or degree of involvement within a situation. This study focuses on children's engagement in family activities; one group of families with a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and one group of families with children with typical development (TD) were compared. Methods: A descriptive study using questionnaires. Analyses were mainly performed by using Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test. Results: Engagement in family activities differed in the two groups of children. The children with PIMD had a lower level of engagement in most family activities even though the activities that engaged the children to a higher or lesser extent were the same in both groups. Child engagement was found to correlate with family characteristics mostly in the children with TD and in the children with PIMD only negative correlations occurred. In the children with PIMD child engagement correlated with cognition in a high number of listed family activities and the children had a low engagement in routines in spite of these being frequently occurring activities. Conclusions: Level of engagement in family activities in the group of children with PIMD was lower compared with that in the group of children with TD. Families with a child with PIMD spend much time and effort to adapt family living patterns to the child's functioning

  • 2.
    Christensen, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Patterns of support to adolescents related to disability, family situation, harassment and economy2019In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 644-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents need support from family, friends, and teachers to increase their involvement in everyday life. Their environment and their own characteristics also influence their ability to participate in an everyday supportive environment. Aim The aim of the study was to investigate patterns of support from parents, teachers, and very important persons such as peers to the ability of adolescents to participate in everyday life, as well as the importance of interpersonal relations as experienced by the adolescents. Method The study has a cross-sectional design. The data compiled and analysed in this study are part of a longitudinal study of adolescents and their development into adults-LoRDIA (Longitudinal Research on Development In Adolescence). A combination of person- and variable-oriented design was used to capture patterns of support. Results Adolescents with a complicated home situation and low economic prerequisites who received little support from parents and friends participated to a lower degree in home activities. A substantial number of these adolescents had self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders and, as a group, were more often exposed to harassment. However, these adolescents participated to a higher extent in school activities, although they received little support from the teachers. The adolescents who received most support from parents and teachers were those with a country of origin other than Sweden and those who lived with both of their parents and had more siblings than average. However, this did not mean that they participated to a higher extent in home and school activities.

  • 3.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Granlund, Mats
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Alderman, I.
    Kottorp, A.
    Development of a new assessment of time processing ability in children, using Rasch analysis2008In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 771-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Children with disabilities like ADHD, Autism or Intellectual Disabilities may have problems with everyday functioning related to time management and hence there is a need to develop systematic methods for evaluation of the ability to understand and use time information. The purpose of this study was to examine aspects of construct validity of a new instrument, KaTid, for assessing time processing ability (TPA) in children. Methods Data from 144 typically developing, 5-10-years-old typically developing children, were analysed with Rasch analysis. Instruments used were the KaTid, a self-rating scale measuring autonomy in daily routines and a parent scale measuring daily time management. Results Fifty-one items in KaTid, initially defined in three subcategories: time perception, time orientation and time management, all demonstrated acceptable goodness-of-fit to a Rasch model, indicating evidence of internal scale validity. Performance of the children on the KaTid also provided evidence for validity in response processes and that it may discriminate among children with different levels of TPA. Relationships between the KaTid measures and the parents' ratings of the child's daily time management indicated further evidence of construct validity. Conclusions The results of this study supports evidence of construct validity in the KaTid when used with typically developing 5-10 years-old children. Further research is needed to evaluate the validity of KaTid in children with known time processing difficulties.

  • 4.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Imms, C.
    Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
    Anaby, D.
    School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
    Kramer, J. M.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States.
    Girdler, S.
    Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Gorter, J. W.
    Department of Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy Science and Sports, UMC Utrecht Brain Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Ketelaar, M.
    Utrecht, Brain Center and De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Jahnsen, R. B.
    Beitostølen Healthsports Center, Beitostølen, Norway.
    Elliott, C.
    Telethon Kids Institute, Perth Children's Hospital, School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Granlund, M.
    Department of Social Work, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    How can we reach long-lasting inclusive participation for all?: A vision for the future2024In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 50, no 2, article id e13249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2022, an international conference was held focusing on ‘participation’. We shared current evidence, identified knowledge gaps and worked together to understand what new knowledge and community and practice changes were needed. This brief communication is a summary of the conference delegates' discussions. We present the key assumptions we make about participation and propose what is needed to create change for societies, communities, families and individuals. While we have some robust evidence to support participation approaches, more is needed, and it is everyone's responsibility to build an inclusive society where participation for all is the reality.

  • 5.
    Wallin Ahlström, Sara
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Falun Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna Uppsala University Falun Sweden;School of Health and Welfare Dalarna University Falun Sweden;Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.
    Harder, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare (HVV) Mälardalen University Västerås Sweden.
    The experiences and the meaning of using MyTime in the preschool context from the perspective of children in need of special support, 5–6 years of age2023In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Children in need of special support often display delays in time processing ability, affecting everyday functioning. MyTime is an intervention programme for systematic training of time processing ability. To support preschool children's development of time processing ability and everyday functioning, it is necessary to include their perspectives of the MyTime intervention programme. A previous study shows that MyTime is feasible with children in the preschool setting and shows positive effects on time processing ability for older children in special schools. Yet, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how preschool children experience the intervention programme and how they understand its meaning. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and the meaning of using MyTime from the perspective of children with informal needs of special support (INS) 5–6 years of age in the preschool context.

    Methods

    To explore the children's perspectives, video-recorded interviews with 21 children were analysed hermeneutically. To facilitate the interview situation with the children in need of special support, the Talking Mats© was used. Both body and spoken languages were analysed.

    Results

    The results reveal children as active participants, willing to share their experiences of using the MyTime intervention in the preschool context. The conceptualization of the children's experiences and expressions uncovers their meaning of using the MyTime intervention as to know and to understand time by doing.

    Conclusions

    When children are given the opportunity to use concrete tools to understand and measure time, they experience themselves as active participants involved and engaged in the intervention. They reveal meaningful experiences to be able to manage time that facilitate their everyday functioning and participation in the preschool context.

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