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  • 1.
    Gynne, Annaliina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro universitet.
    Languaging in the twenty-first century: exploring varieties and modalities in literacies inside and outside learning spaces2015In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 509-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presented in this paper focuses on young people’s languaging, or ways-with-being-with-words, including literacies, in everyday practices that stretch across formal and informal learning spaces. Taking sociocultural and ethnographic points of departure, the aim of the study is to investigate aspects of young people’s situated and distributed ways of engaging in knowledge production in academic “writing” genres, as well as their agency in relation to pedagogic goals as administered by teachers in these practices. Through analysis of data sets consisting of field notes, video recordings and particularly literacy data, the study presents analysis of three cases of students’ work in project-based learning and instructional tasks inside and outside a ‘bilingual-bicultural’ school setting. The paper puts forth a multi-dimensional analysis of communicative and learning practices and suggests refocusing scholarly interests of ‘multilingualism’ towards an examination of different dimensions of modalities and language varieties in languaging practices. The findings indicate that student agency is central in contributing to the shaping of the nature of their languaging across the interrelated dimensions of time and space. Furthermore, this study suggests that pedagogical practices in language, including literacy, classes need to be transformed and recontextualized in order to embrace student agency.

  • 2.
    Sert, Olcay
    et al.
    Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Walsh, Steve
    Newcastle University, UK.
    The interactional management of claims of insufficient knowledge in English language classrooms2013In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 542-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper primarily investigates the interactional unfolding and management of claims of insufficient knowledge’ (Beach and Metzger 1997) in two English language classrooms from a multi-modal, conversation-analytic perspective. The analyses draw on a close, micro-analytic account of sequential organisation of talk as well as on various multi-semiotic resources the participants enact including gaze, gestures, body movements and orientations to classroom artefacts. The research utilises transcriptions of 16 (classroom) hours of video recordings, which were collected over a six-week period in 2010 in a public school in Luxembourg. The findings show that establishing recipiency through mutual gaze and turn allocation practices have interactional and pedagogical consequences that may lead to claims of insufficient knowledge. Furthermore, the findings illustrate various multi-modal resources the students use (e.g. gaze movements, facial gestures and headshakes) to initiate embodied claims of no knowledge and to show specific exchange structures. Finally, we suggest that certain interactional resources, including embodied vocabulary explanations and Designedly Incomplete Utterances (Koshik 2002), deployed by the teacher after a student’s claim of insufficient knowledge may lead to student engagement, which is a desirable pedagogical goal. Our findings have implications for the analysis of insufficient knowledge, for teaching, teacher education and in particular for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence (Walsh 2006).

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