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  • 1.
    Boren, T.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, M.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Oslo University, Oslo, Norway .
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Axelsson, A. K.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sweden's LSS and Social Integration: An Exploration of the Relationship between Personal Assistant Type, Activities, and Participation for Children with PIMD2016In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 50-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish personal assistance system, facilitated through Swedish legislation (known as the LSS), allows children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) to receive subsidized personal assistance. This assistance may be either a hired professional from outside the family or a parent paid as a personal assistant. The type of personal assistant can impact activity selection. As noted by bio-ecological systems theory, participation in "systems" beyond the household is important for a child's cognitive and social development, including the development of children with disabilities. The authors explored whether children's personal assistant type (i.e., external or parental) is related to their presence in socially integrative activities (SIAs) versus non-socially integrative activities (NSIAs). The relationship between children's activity engagement and their personal assistant type was examined via a descriptive, comparative study based on a questionnaire. Sixty families answered, providing quantitative data about personal assistance type across 56 common family activities. Children's external assistants showed a greater presence in SIAs than children's parental assistants, who showed a greater presence in NSIAs. The level of activity engagement between personal assistant type, however, had a less direct relationship. In accordance with bio-ecological systems theory, activity selection can influence the child's cognitive and social development. Ultimately, this study suggests that external assistants partake in more SIAs than parental assistants, likely as a function of providing respite for families. This respite stems from the LSS's implicit role for external personal assistants to also serve as relief for parents. In turn, by facilitating exposure to broader systems, these external assistants can play a critical role in children's social and cognitive development.

  • 2.
    Ramsten, Camilla
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Dag, Munir
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna Univ, Falun, Sweden.
    A Balance of Social Inclusion and Risks: Staff Perceptions of Information and Communication technology in the Daily Life of Young Adults with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disability in a Social Care Context2019In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Information and communication technology (ICT) has increased in importance and facilitates participation in several life areas throughout society. However, young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability make less use ICT than the general population. Disability services staff play a central role in supporting and enabling service users in daily life, and their perceptions of ICT are important to their role in service provision.

    Aim: To describe staff perceptions of the role of ICT and how it affects daily life in young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability living in residential homes.

    Method: Focus group interviews and individual interviews were conducted with staff working in residential homes in which young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability live. All materials were transcribed verbatim and analysed using latent content analysis.

    Findings: Staff perceived ICT and, more specifically, the Internet as being supportive of both daily life and social relationships of these young adults, but they also viewed ICT as posing social risks. Perceptions of and support for ICT were related to staff perceptions about what is appropriate and manageable in relation to an individual resident’s functioning level. Staff members also considered the views of parents about appropriate content when providing support.

    Discussion: Staff in residential homes for young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability use their implicit moral judgement about the use of ICT by residents. Their enablement of and support for ICT are not primarily based on the service user’s wishes or interests. This finding implies a risk that the organization of a conflict-free service provision is a higher priority than service users’ participation in social life.

  • 3.
    Wallén, Eva Flygare
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Marcus, C.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Eating patterns among students with intellectual disabilities after a multifactorial school intervention using the plate model2013In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) have an increased prevalence of being overweight and having cardiometabolic diseases as adults, in part due to poor eating habits with an inadequate intake of vegetables. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a multifactorial school intervention using the "Plate Model" results in improved healthy food choices with recommended ≥37.5% of vegetables. Participants with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities from an intervention school (n=27) were compared with controls (n=62) from two other upper secondary schools for students with ID. All were offered a test buffet lunch with meatballs, potatoes, sauce, and eight different vegetables presented in identical bowls. Their servings and food intake were evaluated from digital images and video films. The majority (88%) of the total group filled their plate with ≥37.5% of vegetables. The mean energy intake did not differ between the groups (576kcal (min 196-max 1444)). The intervention participants had a lower intake of fat (21% (SD 6) vs. 24% (SD 7), p=031), a higher intake of carbohydrates (57% (SD 7) vs. 53% (SD 8), p=035), less plate waste (5 (SD 10) grams vs. 25 (SD 43) grams, p=021), and more participants took only one portion (56% vs. 32%, p=039) compared with the control group. The participants from the intervention school made healthier food choices. In this setting, most adolescents with ID ate a sufficient amount of vegetables.

  • 4.
    Ylvén, Regina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Granlund, Mats
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Literature Review of Positive Functioning in Families With Children With a Disability2006In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 253-270Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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