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  • 1.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Gustafsson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Jonsson, Gunnar
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Talking physics during small-group work with context-rich problems - Analysed from an ownership perspective2009In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 455-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study provides analyses of the conversations when university students work in small groups solving context-rich physics problems. We constructed context-rich, open-ended physics problems related to everyday life situations that lack some information required to solve and complete the tasks. The students' ownership of learning, their actions of choice and control, was analyzed in two dimensions: group and individual. Conversation analyses and flowcharts of the conversation were constructed from the complete transcripts of three groups. The theoretical framework for student ownership of learning demonstrated that it was possible to show that even if students have group ownership of the task, the individual student ownership of learning is not self-evident. The study also demonstrates the methodological power and value of the flowchart to identify conversation patterns in the groups that were effective in the search for exploratory talks and individual questions. We discuss implications for teacher development to enhance group work.

  • 2.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Niedderer, Hans
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Two Dimensions of Student Ownership of Learning During Small-Group Work in Physics2008In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 629-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The theoretical framework student ownership of learning is developed both theoretically and with qualitative research. The metaphor "ownership" is related to the process towards meaning making and understanding and is seen as relevant especially to improve physics instruction. The dimension group ownership of learning refers to the groups' actions of choice and control of the management of the task; how the task is determined, performed and finally reported. The other dimension, the individual student ownership of learning, refers to an individual student's own question/idea that comes from own experiences, interests or anomalies of understanding; an idea/question that comes back several times and leads to new insights. From literature and from our own data, we have developed categories for group and individual student ownership of learning, which were iteratively sharpened in order to identify ownership in the two dimensions. As a consequence, we argue for use of the framework student ownership of learning as a way to identify an optimal level of ownership for better learning and higher motivation in physics teaching.

  • 3.
    Engström, Susanne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Gustafsson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Niedderer, Hans
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    CONTENT FOR TEACHING SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS IN PHYSICS AT UPPER SECONDARY SCHOOL2011In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 1281-1304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding energy with a focus on sustainable development requires further knowledge beyond traditional conceptual understanding. This paper presents the result from one main investigation and two smaller follow-up studies. The main study (step 1) consists of an interpreting, iterative analysis of statements made by experts on contents for physics education on energy with focus on sustainable energy systems gathered from a questionnaire, which results in subject-specific contents for physics teaching presented as a category system of objectives. The categories from step 1 are used as means for analyses in steps 2 and 3, which involve the study of educational material and one physics class. The results show that the content of physics for upper secondary, in order for students to reach insight, should comprise certain physical concepts and relations not only in ‘limited contexts’ but also in relation to greater contextual connections, in which problematisation and insight in solutions for the future is necessary. These parts should have a similar weight according to the statements of the experts. This is not to be found in either the typical educational material (textbooks) or in one physics class, which has been studied.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • 4.
    Lindvall, Jannika
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Two large-scale professional development programs for mathematics teachers and their impact on student achievement2017In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 1281-1301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on two professional development programs for mathematics teachers and their effects on student achievement. The projects’ design and their implementation within a larger municipality in Sweden, working together with over 90 teachers and 5000 students in elementary school, are described by using a set of core critical features of teacher professional development as identified in the research literature. Data on student achievement were collected at the beginning of the projects as well as one year after their implementation. The results demonstrate a significant interaction effect between year and intervention for grades 2, 8, and 9. Upon a closer examination of the descriptive statistics, the first project points at slight improvements for students in grade 2, while the results for grades 8 and 9 indicate a declining trend. The results for the second project are markedly different and indicate an improvement for student achievement in grades 8 and 9, while the results for grade 2 suggest a deterioration. Considering that both projects are conducted within the same context and are very similar when it comes to several of the critical features of professional development as identified in the research literature, these variances in results are noteworthy. Therefore, building on a closer examination of the projects’ critical features, the Swedish educational context, and results from teacher evaluations, the article ends with a discussion of possible explanations for the variations found between, as well as within, the two projects’ differing impact on student achievement.

  • 5.
    Olsson, Jan
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    The Contribution of Reasoning to the Utilization of Feedback from Software When Solving Mathematical Problems2018In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 715-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how students’ reasoning contributes to their utilization of computer-generated feedback. Sixteen 16-year-old students solved a linear function task designed to present a challenge to them using dynamic software, GeoGebra, for assistance. The data were analysed with respect both to character of reasoning and to the use of feedback generated through activities in GeoGebra. The results showed that students who successfully solved the task were engaged in creative reasoning and used feedback extensively.

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