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  • 1.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Johansson, Anders W
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Entrepreneurship and Conscientization on Processes of Regional Development2007In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 499-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based upon a regional development project in a 'vulnerable' Swedish region consisting of three municipalities. At a first glance, this is a region in decline that is lacking in entrepreneurial initiatives. During a crucial time period the project 'Diversity in Entrepreneurship' (DiE) was launched to help the region to become more entrepreneurial and inclusive. An underlying logic was built into the project, which is associated with the critical pedagogy of Paolo Freire. From a Freirean perspective regions lacking in entrepreneurship could be reconsidered emphasizing that the entrepreneurial initiatives are always there - latent - however restrained by certain discourses; in this case a dominant enterprise discourse. Above all the enterprise discourse suppresses the ability for particular groups in society to view themselves as entrepreneurs. The purpose of this paper is to introduce Freire's critical pedagogical perspective to entrepreneurship and regional development. An episode illustrating how the enterprise discourse suppresses an equality discourse, introduced by way of the DiE-project, makes the point of departure for discussing the process of 'conscientization', which refers to a type of learning that is focused on perceiving and exposing contradictions and to take action against the oppressive elements of reality (Freire 1970). Some key Freirean ideas or concepts are explained, first as they were expressed by Freire and then applied to entrepreneurship and regional development. It is then discussed how these concepts found their expressions in the project. The critical pedagogic perspective not only emphasizes an entrepreneurial potential in every individual, but it also gives an idea of what kind of processes could release entrepreneurial initiatives among those who do not view themselves as entrepreneurs.

  • 2. Book, Tommy
    et al.
    Stier, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ghettot som geografisk, historisk och sociologisk företeelse2004Book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Jonasson, Mikael
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centrum för samhällsanalys (CESAM).
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Stockholm University.
    Smith, Phil
    Plymouth University.
    Performing Guided Tours: Editorial2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 85-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Redmalm, David
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Review of Humans, Animals and Biopolitics: The More-than-Human Condition, Edited by Kristin Asdal, Tone Druglitrö and Steve Hinchliffe2017In: Nordic Journal of Science and Technology Studies, ISSN 1894-4647, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 38-39Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Michel Foucault’s concept of biopolitics captures the way a decentralized form of governing measures and mobilizes life itself through a number of technologies, such as demographics, surveillance and health initiatives, with the aim to prolong and enhance the lives of a population. According to Foucault, this biopolitical form of governing characteristic of modernity implies a detached and technical stance towards individual lives. In short, biopolitics turns individual lives into life as a mass noun. Interestingly, when human life is treated as a resource, human’s self-proclaimed position as the crown of creation is unsettled and humans find themselves part of the same biopolitical nexus as many other animals. The technologies and consequences of the biopolitization of humans and other animals is the subject of the volume Humans, Animals and Biopolitics, edited by Kristin Asdal, Tone Druglitrö and Steve Hinchliffe. It is a book that should be required reading for Foucauldian theorists and human-animal studies scholars alike.

  • 5.
    Redmalm, David
    HumAnimal Group, Cultural Matters Group.
    Sharing the condition of abandonment: The beastly topology of condolence cards for bereaved pet owners2017In: Animal Places: Lively Cartographies of Human-Animal Relations / [ed] Jacob Bull, Tora Holmberg and Cecilia Åsberg, London and New York: Routledge , 2017, 1, p. 89-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on spatiality in representations of the loss of and grief for companion animals. Giorgio Agamben’s theorization of the distinction between political and bare life is used to analyse around 350 condolence cards for bereaved pet owners. It is shown that the visual emplacement of pets in different contexts in the collection of cards underlines that pets are worth grieving, while at the same time a distance is maintained between humans and other animals. In spite of this distancing, it is argued that the cards have the potential to challenge the normative boundary between grievable and ungrievable life. 

  • 6.
    Redmalm, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Schuurman, Nora
    Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Scandinavian pet cemeteries as shared spaces of companion animal death2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pets are animals included in the cultural realm, they are often considered family members and, to some extent, the rituals surrounding their death resemble those of human death. Yet, pet owners also conceive of their pets as animals who are guided by their instincts and belong to the realm of nature. Special cemeteries for pets, for instance, have been established in many Western countries since the 19th century. Pet cemeteries are often located in natural environments in rural or peri-urban areas, with a suggested association between animals and nature. These spaces present a specific culture of petkeeping, where remembrance and different material and visual expressions of grief for the death of a companion animal are allowed, encouraged and shared.

    In this presentation, we explore the ways in which companion animal death is performed in pet cemeteries in Scandinavia. Drawing from photographic data collected at selected pet cemeteries in Finland and Sweden, supported by interviews with key informants and information published by cemetery organizations on websites and in newsletters, we explore the material practices and shared spaces of mourning and remembrance. In Scandinavia, the popularity of second homes is high, which means that many owners choose to bury their animal companion on private land. Cremation services for pets are also widely used by owners. In this context, pet cemeteries can be understood as spaces where the mourning is shared between pet owners. The grave of a pet is individually marked and has an identity that makes it both similar to and different from other graves. 

    In our study, we investigate different practices and rituals related to animal death at pet cemeteries. We focus on the use of items such as headstones, statues, and pictures, with attached verses and other verbal remembrance at the grave. We also pay attention to rules and norms prevalent at the cemeteries, as well as to the role of religion and related use of the cross and figures such as angels. We suggest that in these spaces pets are simultaneously grieved as human-like friends and family members, and as nonhuman others. Pet cemeteries thus mirror humans’ ambivalent status to nonhuman animals and to the idea of nature.

  • 7.
    Schuurman, Nora
    et al.
    Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Redmalm, David
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    My Friend Who Never Let Me Down: Ambiguous Emotions at Pet Cemeteries2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pets are liminal creatures: they are regarded as friends and family while they are, at the same time, considered to be belongings. Violence against pets is highly socially stigmatizing in most contexts, but at the same time, owners of companion animals may chose to end their pets’ lives without facing legal charges. There is a general idea, present both in research and popular culture, of a widespread norm against strong emotional responses to the passing of a pet. The reason would be that pets are not considered fully human, and grieving pets in a way similar to human mourning would challenge the boundary between humans and other animals. Yet, there are numerous products and services specifically designed for bereaved pet owners: condolence cards, bereavement counseling, popular psychology books—and pet cemeteries. Through an ethnographic study of pet cemeteries in Sweden, Finland and Norway, we show how pets’ ambiguous status is conveyed through tombstones, decorations and the practices of cemetery visits. Relying on photographs, field notes, interviews with key informants, and the studied pet cemetery organizations’ documentation, we explore the material and meaning-making practices that make these places possible. We suggest that these spaces enable a double sense of pets’ life: pets are simultaneously grieved as human-like friends and family members through anthropocentric gestures, and as nonhuman others through innovative and norm-challenging ways of grieving. Drawing on Judith Butler’s writing on grief, and Giorgio Agambens’ conceptualization of “the animal,” we discuss how practices at pet cemeteries convey abstract and sometimes ambiguous understandings of what life is.

1 - 7 of 7
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