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  • 1.
    Asztalos Morell, Ildikó
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Urban & Rural Dev, Umea, Sweden..
    The Role of Public Private Partnership in the Governance of Racialised Poverty in a Marginalised Rural Municipality in Hungary2019In: Sociologia Ruralis, ISSN 0038-0199, E-ISSN 1467-9523, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 494-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the local governance of poverty alleviation in a marginalised Hungarian rural community, with over 50 per cent Roma inhabitants, most of whom were either unemployed or participated in public work projects. Kisbalog is among those marginalised rural communities which are characterised by increasing social polarisation and ethnic cleavages as a result of selective outmigration and a municipal leadership which negotiates access to public work along racialised notions of deservingness. Hungary follows the EU concept of public private partnerships for local governance. This article unravels the room for manoeuvre for NGOs working for poverty alleviation in the context of the racialised narratives of a paternalistic local welfare state. Utilising Young's notions of social justice it explores the complicit nature of recognitional, associative and distributional justice in order to understand the interplay in partnerships between public and private agencies. From among three types of strategies, coercive, isolated and deliberative, the last one has the potential to bring about transformative changes.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Funcke, Alexander
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Stockholm University, Sweden; Harvard University, United States .
    A Below-Average Effect with Respect to American Political Stereotypes on Warmth and Competence2015In: Political Psychology, ISSN 0162-895X, E-ISSN 1467-9221, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "above-average effect" is the phenomenon that people tend to judge themselves above average on desirable traits. Based on social identity theory, we propose that a "below-average effect" may arise when individuals rate themselves and the average ingroup member on traits stereotypically associated with the ingroup. In two studies, Republican and Democrat participants rated themselves and the average political ingroup member on possession of desirable traits related to warmth and competence. Current political stereotypes in America associate the former dimension with Democrats and the latter with Republicans. Consistent with our hypothesis, the above-average effect was moderated by political group and dimension in interaction. In particular, Democrats rated themselves below the average Democrat on warmth and Republicans rated themselves below the average Republican on competence. 

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Strimling, P.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Andersson, P. A.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Aveyard, M.
    American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.
    Brauer, M.
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States.
    Gritskov, V.
    Saint Petersburg State University, Russian Federation.
    Kiyonari, T.
    Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan.
    Kuhlman, D. M.
    University of Delaware, United States.
    Maitner, A. T.
    American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.
    Manesi, Z.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Molho, C.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Peperkoorn, L. S.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Rizwan, M.
    Delve Pvt Ltd, Pakistan.
    Stivers, A. W.
    Gonzaga University, United States.
    Tian, Q.
    Shandong Normal University, China.
    Van Lange, P. A. M.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Vartanova, I.
    National Research University, Higher School of Economics, Russian Federation.
    Wu, J.
    Beijing Normal University, China.
    Yamagishi, T.
    Hitotsubashi University, Japan.
    Cultural Universals and Cultural Differences in Meta-Norms about Peer Punishment2017In: Management and Organization Review, ISSN 1740-8776, E-ISSN 1740-8784, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 851-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violators of cooperation norms may be informally punished by their peers. How such norm enforcement is judged by others can be regarded as a meta-norm (i.e., a second-order norm). We examined whether meta-norms about peer punishment vary across cultures by having students in eight countries judge animations in which an agent who over-harvested a common resource was punished either by a single peer or by the entire peer group. Whether the punishment was retributive or restorative varied between two studies, and findings were largely consistent across these two types of punishment. Across all countries, punishment was judged as more appropriate when implemented by the entire peer group than by an individual. Differences between countries were revealed in judgments of punishers vs. non-punishers. Specifically, appraisals of punishers were relatively negative in three Western countries and Japan, and more neutral in Pakistan, UAE, Russia, and China, consistent with the influence of individualism, power distance, and/or indulgence. Our studies constitute a first step in mapping how meta-norms vary around the globe, demonstrating both cultural universals and cultural differences. 

  • 4.
    Redmalm, David
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    A bifocal perspective on the riding school: On Lévinas and equine faces2019In: Equine Cultures in Transition: Ethical Questions / [ed] Jonna Bornemark, Petra Andersson, Ulla Ekström von Essen, London: Routledge , 2019, p. 193-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Redmalm’s chapter, “A Bifocal Perspective on the Riding School: On Lévinas and Equine Faces” draws on Emmanuel Lévinas’ ethics to study the ambiguous relationship between horses and leisure riders in riding schools. For Lévinas, ethics begins in the face-to-face relationship. Being bifocal, horses do not “face” humans in an anthropomorphic sense; however, deeply meaningful relationships emerge from the embodied horse-human reciprocity. The encounters at the riding school opens up the possibility of recognizing a Lévinasian “face” in horses in a wide sense of the term, but the prevalent instrumental approach towards horses as learning tools obscures horses’ status as possible ethical others. The riding school thus creates a bifocal view of horses as both partners in embodied emphatic entanglement, and instruments that riders must learn to handle and control. The riding school as such works as an environment where these two opposing versions of the horse are accommodated so that the potential tension between the two perspectives is alleviated. Nevertheless, it is possible to imagine alternative human-horse relationships by focusing on the situations at riding schools where equine faces are allowed to emerge.

  • 5.
    Redmalm, David
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Gränsdjur: Om konsten att balansera på gränsen mellan natur och kultur med människor, hundar, hästar och andra djur2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktionstext till Korpo filosofidagar 2019, tema "En gemensam värld: Djur och kultur" 

    Människan och djur är en tematik som genomsyrar filosofin, där idéer om det mänskliga ofta uttrycks i kontrast till natur eller djur. Under Korpo filosofidagar undersöks människans relationer till djur som en öppen fråga: vilka olika innebörder kan djur få i våra liv? Djur finns på olika platser: i våra hem, på laboratorier, i lantbruket, i naturen och på djurparker. Vilka samhälleliga, etiska, politiska och filosofiska frågeställningar väcks i dessa sammanhang?

    Samtida diskussioner om djuren i kulturen sitter ofta fast i bilder av djur som tidlösa naturvarelser medan människan ses som dynamisk, kulturell och föränderlig. Denna bild har i allt högre grad ifrågasatts i diskussioner om ”det antropocena” och ”det posthumana”, som strävar att ifrågasätta vanemässiga tankesätt och uppdelningar mellan ”djur och människa”, och granskar hur människor och djur skapar praktiker och gemenskaper tillsammans. Under Korpo filosofidagar diskuterade vi denna tematik ur olika synvinklar, med en strävan till att få en klarare bild av djuren i kulturen.

  • 6.
    Redmalm, David
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Holy Bonsai Wolves: Chihuahuas and the Paris Hilton Syndrome2019In: On Dogs: An Anthology, Kendal, Cumbria: Notting Hill Editions , 2019, 1, p. 147-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the reasons for the Chihuahua breed’s popularity in contemporary western society by looking at two sets of data: Chihuahua handbooks and The Simple Life show, starring Paris Hilton and her Chihuahua Tinkerbell. The article argues that the Chihuahua is a holy anomaly: a creature which can be used in myths and rituals to temporarily alleviate the tension-filled binary oppositions and stereotypes inherent in a particular culture, in order to celebrate and reinforce that culture’s categories and social order. The Chihuahua – or the bonsai wolf – transcends two binary oppositions fundamental to contemporary westerners: subject/object and nature/culture. Although the Chihuahua challenges a number of related binary oppositions, it is generally dismissed as a matter for humor, low-brow entertainment or expressions of sentimentality, rendering ritual encounters with Chihuahuas harmless. The article concludes by asking: what would happen if humans actually started listening to what the Chihuahua is telling them?

  • 7.
    Redmalm, David
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Liminanimals: Celebrity Chihuahuas, Presidential Pets and Riding School Horses2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n this lecture sociologist David Redmalm will talk about companion animals and their liminal status in human society. He will show how thinking with companion animals can challenge ingrained stereotypical ideas about the distinction between nature and culture, and how this distinction shapes interspecies relationality. To show how "liminanimals" can enable a more nuanced understanding of what we think of as nature and culture, David Redmalm will draw on a number of examples from his own research: Chihuahuas and their symbolic and material role in Western society, the media narrative of Obama family’s dog Bo Obama, and the disciplining of human and equine bodies in riding schools.

  • 8.
    Redmalm, David
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    The Topsy-Turvy Centaur: The Production of Human Bodies and Equine Minds in Riding Schools2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation is based on preliminary findings from an ethnographic study of adult pupils at riding schools. The study is part of the research project Intimate Sociality: Practice and Identity in Collective Housing, Human-Animal Relations and Couple Dancing, based at The Institute for Future Studies (project leader: Maria Törnqvist). The study explores the kind of intimacy that pupils strive for and often find at riding schools in relation to human and equine animals. Intimate sociality at riding schools is brief and momentary: during and in connection to riding classes the participants share experiences of a wide range of events and emotions, but the discussions and social relations at the schools are generally left behind when the pupils return home. Nevertheless, riding school interactions between humans and horses have a deeper resonance in the lives of the pupils. As part of their education, the pupils learn to control their bodies. This control means that the pupils start to pay attention to their own physical being, rather than their thoughts, in contrast to the usual emphasis on the cerebral in their everyday lives. In this way, the riders let their bodies take control of their minds, rather than the other way around. Further, to attune their bodies to the horses they ride, it becomes crucial to ascribe a mind and personhood to the horses. This turns the widespread idea of the horse and rider as a centaur with a horse’s body and a human mind literally upside down. In the empirical material—both during observations and in interviews—the rider is emphasized as body, while the horse is emphasized as a minded being. I discuss this peculiar creature—the topsy-turvy centaur—in relation to Michel Foucualt’s conceptualization of power and Charlotte Perkin Gilman’s use of the figure of the horse in her theorization of inequality, and suggest that this figure challenges not only ideals related to contemporary capitalist society, but also ideals associated with being human. However, while leisure riding opens up for certain subversive possibilities for the riding human, it is not necessarily the same for the horses involved. This is also recognized by the pupils in the study: they continuously orient to the inequality between humans and horses in the way they talk about themselves, other humans, and the horses they ride.

  • 9.
    Redmalm, David
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    To make pets live, and to let them die: The biopolitics of pet keeping2019In: Death Matters: Cultural Sociology of Mortal Life / [ed] Tora Holmberg, Annika Jonsson, Fredrik Palm, London: Palgrave Macmillan , 2019, 1, p. 241-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pets are often considered to be friends or part of the nuclear family, and many pets are grieved when they die. But pets are also routinely bred in abundance, bought, sold, and euthanized when they are unwanted. The aim of this chapter is to suggest a way of understanding pet keeping in the light of pets’ paradoxical status between “grievable” and “killable.” It argues that the ambiguous conceptualization of the pet as an irreplaceable individual and as a consumable resource corresponds to a biopolitical rationale for breeding, buying, selling and killing pets. The chapter suggests that pet keeping can be regarded as a demarcated zone where biopolitical norms surrounding life and death can be played with, managed and reproduced.

  • 10.
    Redmalm, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Tora
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Stable Genius?: The making of “good riders” and “good horses” at the riding school2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do riders valuate human and equine psyches and bodies?  The paper builds on a study in which riding groups are followed before, during and after riding lessons. The analysis shows that early career riders view horses partly as passive tools and partly as threatening adversaries. After a while, riding school pupils come to see horses’ vulnerable position—more experienced riders explain that they try to understand the horses’ perspective of the riding school, which includes long days, difficult pupils and sometimes violent treatment. While riders increasingly come to think of horses as persons, they begin thinking of themselves as human animals—as corporeal rather than cerebral beings. The riding school is thus a place where humans are becoming horse, and the horses emerge as human-like creatures. But while most riders contrast the liberating environment of the riding school to the alienating conditions of the work-week, some also recognize that the riding school requires that the horses are alienated from their own equine selves. Ultimately, “good horses” are the ones seen as willing to accept these conditions. “Good riders” learn to benefit from those same conditions.

  • 11.
    Schuurman, Nora
    et al.
    Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Redmalm, David
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    My Friend Who Never Let Me Down: Ambiguous Emotions at Pet Cemeteries2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pets are liminal creatures: they are regarded as friends and family while they are, at the same time, considered to be belongings. Violence against pets is highly socially stigmatizing in most contexts, but at the same time, owners of companion animals may chose to end their pets’ lives without facing legal charges. There is a general idea, present both in research and popular culture, of a widespread norm against strong emotional responses to the passing of a pet. The reason would be that pets are not considered fully human, and grieving pets in a way similar to human mourning would challenge the boundary between humans and other animals. Yet, there are numerous products and services specifically designed for bereaved pet owners: condolence cards, bereavement counseling, popular psychology books—and pet cemeteries. Through an ethnographic study of pet cemeteries in Sweden, Finland and Norway, we show how pets’ ambiguous status is conveyed through tombstones, decorations and the practices of cemetery visits. Relying on photographs, field notes, interviews with key informants, and the studied pet cemetery organizations’ documentation, we explore the material and meaning-making practices that make these places possible. We suggest that these spaces enable a double sense of pets’ life: pets are simultaneously grieved as human-like friends and family members through anthropocentric gestures, and as nonhuman others through innovative and norm-challenging ways of grieving. Drawing on Judith Butler’s writing on grief, and Giorgio Agambens’ conceptualization of “the animal,” we discuss how practices at pet cemeteries convey abstract and sometimes ambiguous understandings of what life is.

  • 12.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Redmalm, David
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    The Biopolitics of Bo and Barack2011In: The Radical Foucault Conference / [ed] Gilbert, Jeremy;Shaw, Debra, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The optimization of the population as vital has been remolded with recent expressions of multispecies living, a rejuvenation of Environmentalism, the inception of ecology into politics and conceptualizations of post-human society. In this paper we address this re-establishment of government by analyzing the portraits of, and everyday discussions on and with, the First dog Bo Obama. The question we pose is how the First dog is constituted as a true family accessory, well behaved and in extension, an authority who can call upon the presidential subject and the ideal caring citizen? This also requires that the presidential family and staff occasionally walk in the other end of a leash, cuddle with and are companions to, the dog. Equally is the dog shaped to behave in a certain manner coupled with a specific mode of speech, representative of our time. By analyzing the imagery around, and peripheral statements on Bo and his relation to Barack Obama, the First family, the White House and in particular, interactive people, such as animal rights activists, we scrutinize the capillary workings of power. By intertwining Animal Studies with Governmentality theory we illustrate that the discourse around Bo produces him as a neo-liberal social being, offered to speak his own opinion in front of journalists’ microphones and TV cameras, obliged to express taste and distaste, seduced to exercise and keep his body fit, all furthered at internet forums by human animals pretending to be dogs. The imagery around Bo produces a specific reality of not only a legitimate presidential family life filled with standardized leisure time, but also of new possibilities for how to govern the population. As people voluntarily engage in seeing through the eyes of the dog, evaluating their president in relation to the dog, and speaking on behalf of the dog, new power relations arise that utilize this engagement. This exemplifies how a governmental rationality evolves, by how it increasingly takes the life of the non-human animal as its objective whilst people are rendered governable, rationalized to be calculated upon, to be optimized at an aggregate level.

  • 13.
    Söderbäck, Maja
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Care of hospitalized children in Mozambique: nurses' beliefs and practice regarding family involvement2007In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 53-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to describe nurses' beliefs and practice regarding family involvement in the care of hospitalized children in Mozambique. Ethnographic fieldwork was used. The data production consisted of field descriptions from observations and interviews with 36 nurses. Through qualitative content analysis the findings show that nurses' practice of family involvement reflects a society that is poor, hierarchical, family-oriented but at the same time still adaptive. Four themes are identified: family members' presence in order to assist the nurses in care; nurses' support and education of family members to be involved in care; nurses' shielding of family members from family involvement; difficulties and conditional dilemmas in the nurses' involvement of families. It is concluded that emphasizing culturally congruent nursing care is necessary if families' way of life is to be accommodated. However, to empower family involvement in everyday practice, the Mozambican nurses themselves need to be empowered.

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