mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Johansson, K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, P.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Advice to patients in Swedish primary care regarding alcohol and other life style habits: How patients report the actions of GPs in relation to their own expectations and satisfaction with the consultation2005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 615-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Lifestyle advice given by general practitioners (GPs) may be a cost-effective means of health promotion; however, it is not fully put into routine practice. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent GPs' patients expect and receive advice concerning alcohol, tobacco, exercise and diet in relation to sociodemographic characteristics, type of visit and patient satisfaction. METHODS: A postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9750) of patients who had consulted GPs in a county in Sweden. The response rate was 69% (n = 6734). RESULTS: Exercise was the most (16%) and alcohol the least (5%) common type of advice. The patients received advice more often than they expected in all areas except alcohol. The patients reported the highest rate of unfulfilled advice expectation and the lowest rate of unexpected advice in the case of alcohol. Male gender, poorer self-rated health and scheduled appointment were independent predictors of all types of advice. Continuity of GP contact was only favourable for exercise and diet advice. The patients who received advice were more satisfied with their visit to the doctor. CONCLUSIONS: A tertiary preventive perspective guides GPs' practice of giving advice. Male patients with advanced illnesses are given priority. Women and patients with long-term risk habits are more neglected. The GPs tend to misjudge the expectations and needs of their patients and are too restrained in their counselling practice. Alcohol is the most disregarded area of advice in proportion to the patients' expectations and needs.

  • 2. Mårdby, AC
    et al.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Hedenrud, T
    Differences in general beliefs about medicines among doctors and nurses in out-patient care.2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Mårdby, AC
    et al.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Hedenrud, T
    General beliefs about medicines among doctors and nurses in out-patient care: a cross-sectional study2009In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 10, no article number: 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Doctors and nurses are two natural partners in the healthcare team, but they usually differ in their perspectives on how to work for increased health. These professions may also have different beliefs about medicines, a factor important for adherence to medicines. The aim was to explore general beliefs about medicines among doctors and nurses.

    Methods: Questionnaires were sent to 306 private practitioners (PPs), 298 general practitioners (GPs) and 303 nurses in the county of Västra Götaland, Sweden. The questionnaire included sociodemographic questions and the general part of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), which measures the beliefs people have about medicines in general. General beliefs about medicines in relation to background variables were explored with independent t-tests and ANOVA analyses. Differences between occupations and influences of interaction variables were analysed with multiple linear regression models for general beliefs about medicines.

     

     

    Results: The data collection resulted in 616 questionnaires (62.1% PPs; 61.6% GPs; 80.5% nurses). The majority of the PPs and 40% of the GPs were male but most of the nurses were female. The GPs' mean age was 47 years, PPs' 60 years and nurses' 52 years. Few nurses originated from non-Nordic countries while 15% of the PPs and 25% of the GPs did. Nurses saw medicines as more harmful and less beneficial than did PPs and GPs. These differences could not be explained by the included interaction variables. GPs with a Nordic background saw medicines as more beneficial and less harmful than did GPs with a non-Nordic background. 

    Furthermore, GPs of non-Nordic origin were most likely to believe that medicines were  overprescribed by doctors.

    Conclusion: Doctors were more positive about medicines than nurses. The differences in beliefs about medicines found between doctors and nurses could not be explained by any of the included interaction variables. These differences in beliefs may be useful in discussions among future and practising doctors and nurses to enhance understanding of each other's profession and teamwork.

     

  • 4.
    Mårdby, A-C
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences.
    Jörgensen, T
    Beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients2007In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, Vol. 69, p. 158-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse any association between general beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients. Further, to examine general beliefs about medicines by background variables. METHODS: The data were collected by questionnaires including the general section of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), the self-reporting Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and the following background variables: gender, age, education, country of birth and medicine use. The General BMQ measures beliefs about medicines as something harmful (General-Harm), beneficial (General-Benefit) and beliefs about how doctors prescribe medicines (General-Overuse). RESULTS: Of the 324 participating pharmacy clients, 54% were considered non-adherent. An association was found between General-Harm and adherence. Adherent behaviour and higher level of education were associated respectively with more beneficial and less harmful beliefs about medicines. Those born in the Nordic countries regarded medicines as more beneficial. Current users of herbal medicines and non-users of medicines were more likely to believe that doctors overprescribed medicines. CONCLUSIONS: General-Harm was associated with adherence to medication among Swedish pharmacy clients. Country of birth, education and medicine use influenced beliefs about medicines. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Increased awareness of the patient's beliefs about medicines is needed among healthcare providers. We should encourage patients to express their views about medicines in order to optimize and personalize the information process. This can stimulate concordance and adherence to medication.

  • 5.
    Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Dept. of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Hedenrud, Tove
    Dept. of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Different development of general beliefs about medicines during undergraduate studies in medicine, nursing and pharmacy2009In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 283-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Objective: To analyze differences in general beliefs about medicines between healthcare students and to see if health education was of importance to general beliefs about medicines.

    Method: The participants were students of medicine, pharmacy, pharmaceutical bioscience, dispensing pharmacy, nursing and economics (comparison group) at the University of Gothenburg. Data were collected twice in 2003 and 2005. A questionnaire was used comprising background questions and the general part of Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire.

    Results: The questionnaire was completed by 460 of 642 (71.7%) first-year and 293 of 398 (73.6%) thirdyear students. Over 70% were women and two-thirds were under 25 years of age. Medical and pharmacy students saw medicines as less harmful than nursing students did. Stage of education was also important: third-yearmedical and pharmacy students saw medicines as more beneficial and less harmful than firstyear students did. Experience of medicine use was relevant to general beliefs about medicines.

    Conclusion: Different beliefs exist between healthcare professions owing to different types and stages of education, which could result in different messages being given to the patient.

    Practice implications: It is important to educate future healthcare professionals about the potential effect  of beliefs on communication.

  • 6.
    Wanger, Peter
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Martin, Lene
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy.2004In: BMC medical informatics and decision making, ISSN 1472-6947, Vol. 4, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Drug therapy has become increasingly efficient, with more drugs available for treatment of an ever-growing number of conditions. Yet, drug use is reported to be sub optimal in several aspects, such as dosage, patient's adherence and outcome of therapy. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibility to optimize drug therapy using computer programs, available on the Internet. METHODS: One hundred and ten officially endorsed text documents, published between 1996 and 2004, containing guidelines for drug therapy in 246 disorders, were analyzed with regard to information about patient-, disease- and drug-related factors and relationships between these factors. This information was used to construct algorithms for identifying optimum treatment in each of the studied disorders. These algorithms were categorized in order to define as few models as possible that still could accommodate the identified factors and the relationships between them. The resulting program prototypes were implemented in HTML (user interface) and JavaScript (program logic). RESULTS: Three types of algorithms were sufficient for the intended purpose. The simplest type is a list of factors, each of which implies that the particular patient should or should not receive treatment. This is adequate in situations where only one treatment exists. The second type, a more elaborate model, is required when treatment can by provided using drugs from different pharmacological classes and the selection of drug class is dependent on patient characteristics. An easily implemented set of if-then statements was able to manage the identified information in such instances. The third type was needed in the few situations where the selection and dosage of drugs were depending on the degree to which one or more patient-specific factors were present. In these cases the implementation of an established decision model based on fuzzy sets was required. Computer programs based on one of these three models could be constructed regarding all but one of the studied disorders. The single exception was depression, where reliable relationships between patient characteristics, drug classes and outcome of therapy remain to be defined. CONCLUSION: Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy can, with presumably rare exceptions, be developed for any disorder, using standard Internet programming methods.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf