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  • 1.
    Baaz, Felicia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Åkesson, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    UX-metoder som kompletterar användbarhetstest genom att mäta tillfredsställelse: En fallstudie för att validera identifierade metoder2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study has been carried out in collaboration with the company RISE and the group UX Insights, who works with methods to test a product’s usability and ergonomics. The purpose of the study was to find complementary UX methods for usability tests, and to test the methods for verifying whether the selected methods really generate complementary information, as it was requested by the UX Insights group.

    The goal was to identify three methods which could provide information about the user’s feelings, since emotions are linked to the factor satisfaction as opposed to usability tests that generate performance metrics. The goal was also to achieve a better product through tests and concept development, based on the selected methods, through a case study.

    The study was based on two research questions;RQ1. Which evaluation methods can be used to complement usability tests in work with UX and what supplementary information do the methods generate? RQ2. How can evaluation methods for UX be used in the product development process to effectively draw attention to emotional reactions in the interaction between product and human?

    To answer the research questions, a literature study and a case study were conducted. The literature study aimed at identifying complementary methods for usability testing, which resulted in the methods Emocards, semantic differential scale and interview. The identified methods wereused together with usability tests during two tests in the case study. Test one was carried out on two air conditioners that Electrolux assisted with, and test two was carried out on a concept of a new control panel that was developed after product development of the product that was in greatest need of improvement.

    The study resulted in a developed concept that generated better results from the tests, compared to the standard product. The concept received 18 percentage points higher effectiveness and an increase in efficiency as all tasks required at least 40 percentage points less effort. The movement in the circumplex model was 14 and 13 steps for the concept, compared to 32 and 15 steps for the standard product. The concept improved based on the semantic differential scale, where the average value decreased by 1.3 units. The result also showed that usability tests can be complemented by the methods Emocards, semantic differential scale and interview, which means that the whole aspect of UX is measured as the methods together generate both performance-based data and self-reporting data, which generates information on both performance and satisfaction.

    The conclusion of the study showed that all three complementary methods provided information that could be used in the development of the product in the case study. However, all three methods provided similar information and therefore do not need to be used together. For this reason, it is recommended to either complement usability tests with Emocards and interviews or with semantic differential scale and interview. This is because interviews can deepen the information that selected methods generates.

  • 2.
    Balaman, Ufuk
    et al.
    Hacettepe Univ, English Language Teaching, Fac Educ, Ankara, Turkey.
    Sert, Olcay
    Hacettepe Univ, English Language Teaching, Fac Educ, Ankara, Turkey.
    Development of L2 interactional resources for online collaborative task accomplishment2017In: Computer Assisted Language Learning, ISSN 0958-8221, E-ISSN 1744-3210, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 601-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology-mediated task environments have long been considered integral parts of L2 learning and teaching processes. However, the interactional resources that the learners deploy to complete tasks in these environments have remained largely unexplored due to an overall focus on task design and outcomes rather than task engagement processes. With this gap in mind, we set out to describe the emergence, development, and diversification of L2 (English) interactional resources oriented to task completion using conversation analysis for the examination of 13hours of screen-recorded online task-oriented interactions collected over 18 weeks. The focal tasks in the study have been designed as emergent information-gap tasks that require the participants to maintain progressivity by both displaying their own and converging with their co-participants’ dynamic knowledgeability for task completion purposes. A longitudinal investigation into task engagement processes has demonstrated that the participants fail to display their knowledge congruently and they repeatedly disrupt the progressivity of task-oriented interaction in earlier weeks. However, an observable diversification of interactional resources for collaborative task accomplishment has been recorded in later weeks, which demonstrates the development of interactional competence over time. These findings bring insights into interactional competence, epistemics, and CALL with special reference to technology-mediated TBLT.

  • 3.
    Balaman, Ufuk
    et al.
    Hacettepe Üniversitesi, Ankara, Turkey.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Hacettepe Üniversitesi, Ankara, Turkey.
    The coordination of online L2 interaction and orientations to task interface for epistemic progression2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 115, p. 115-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of knowledge in social interaction has been a recent research concern across several fields and the emergence of epistemics as a concept to understand information exchanges has been facilitated mainly through conservation analytic investigations (Heritage, 2012a,b). Relative epistemic status of speakers (Heritage, 2012a) has appeared to be a layer in the multidimensional body of action and knowledge co-construction (Goodwin, 2013). Although the nature of knowledge exchange processes in mundane talk and learning settings has been described in a number of studies, such an understanding has been explored to a lesser extent in technology-mediated and online interactional environments. With this in mind,, we draw on multimodal conversation analysis to describe online video-based interactions based on a single case analysis that represents a larger corpus of 70 h of screen recordings. The findings reveal the incorporation of online interaction, screen orientations, and knowledge co-construction for task accomplishment purposes. The participants coordinate their interactions with their orientations to the task interface to enact epistemic progression, which consequently turns the interface into a layer, a semiotic field, and a screen-based resource in the course of knowledge co-construction. The results have important implications for research on online interaction and epistemics as well as for an understanding of coordination of multiple actions in geographically dispersed settings.

  • 4.
    Blom, Daniel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jarju, Kebba
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Utvecklandet av en idégenereringsprocess: Att genom mångfald öka kvalitén på idén och dess implementering2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Frågeställning: Vilka faktorer har möjlighet att underlätta för både idégenereringsprocesser samt implementeringen utav idéer?

    Problemformulering: Problemet som det kontaktade företaget har är att de har svårt att få sina genererade idéer att verkligen implementeras på avdelningar. I dagsläget får platscheferna välja om de ska implementera idéer i de respektive avdelningar som de är ansvariga över. Många idéer sällan genomförda, vilket är något de vill förbättra. Den problematik som författarna står inför är att försöka skapa en lösning, eller förslag på hur denna process samt förslagens hållbarhet kan förbättras.

    Syfte: Syftet är att hitta faktorer som kan utgöra hinder, vad som kan göras för att åtgärda dessa hinder samt vilka faktorer som kan underlätta processen i sin helhet, från idé till implementering.

    Metod: Bygger på en kvalitativ ansats

    Slutsats: Resulterar i en modell som ska bidra till en ökad förståelse. Denna modell har skapats genom att se över de förutsättningar hos det kontaktade företaget som finns i dagsläget, kombinerat med tidigare forskning som stöd för de förslag som författarna står för. Den ökade förståelsen består bland annat av hur ledarskap kan bidra till idégenerering, eller hur en organisation kan dra nytta utav organisatoriskt lärande.

  • 5.
    Celik, Sercan
    et al.
    TED University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Baran, Evrim
    Iowa State University, Ames, USA.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    The Affordances of Mobile-App Supported Teacher Observations for Peer Feedback2018In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 36-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technologies offer new affordances for teacher observation in teacher education programs, albeit under-examined in contrast to video technologies. The purpose of this article is to investigate the integration of mobile technologies into teacher observation. Using a case study method, the authors compare the traditional narrative paper-pen, mobile app-supported, and video observation methods. Participants included 2 experienced teachers of English as a Foreign Language who were selected as the observers and observees in a higher education institutional context. The data was collected in three different teaching sessions over 4 weeks. Data sources included lesson observation notes and semi structured interviews conducted with teachers after each session. Results suggest recommendations for the integration of mobile and video based observation tools into teacher professional development programs, pre-service and in-service teacher education programs, as well as teacher certificate programs.

  • 6.
    Cozza, Michela
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Doing (Open) Innovation through Networking2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    University of Trento, Italy.
    De Angeli, Antonella
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Infrastructuring diversity in stereotypes2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. University of Trento, Italy.
    De Angeli, Antonella
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Scaling up participatory design2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Tonolli, Lista
    University of Trento, Italy.
    D'Andrea, Vincenzo
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Subversive Participatory Design: Reflections on a case-study2016In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, volume 2: PDC '16 Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Interactive Exhibitions, Workshops, 2016, Vol. 2, p. 53-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    his paper grounds in a research experience for engaging older people as co-designers of several wearable and in-house technologies. We start by describing a case study that is a pre-commercial procurement aimed at developing innovative services for the welfare of citizens, with a focus on older people. We present and discuss the qualitative data gathered on the occasion of a bodystorming with two groups of participants. The analysis led to the identification of the "aesthetic appropriateness", the "social sensitivity", and the "gender awareness" as three different dimensions that affected the acceptability of the technological devices. This approach created the conditions for instantiating the subversive power of participation. At the same time, such a subversion proved the authenticity of the participatory process. By drawing on this project, the purpose of the paper is to further our understanding of the conditions for Participatory Design.

  • 10.
    De Angeli, Antonella
    et al.
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Cozza, Michela
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Jovanovic, Mladjan
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Tonolli, Linda
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Mushiba, Mark
    University of Trento, Italy.
    McNeill, Andrew
    Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.
    Coventry, Lynne
    Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.
    Understanding Motivations in Designing for Older Adults2016In: Understanding Motivations in Designing for Older Adults, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tactile reading: Tactile understanding2012In: Assistive Technology for Blindness and Low Vision, CRC Press , 2012, p. 193-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As pointed out already by the French philosopher Dennis Diderot in the late 18th century, sight is a very efficient and elegant sense (Diderot, 1749). It is possible to see great distances and very close-up views. By looking, we can quickly get an idea of an environment or a specific milieu. Through pictures on the Internet, nonfiction books, storybooks for children or magazines, we get information about, for example, different parts of the world or fashion. Sight is used to orient us in many different ways, socially and geographically. It is possible to perceive space entirely from vision, but it could be apprehended from haptic experience as well as hearing. For sighted people, hearing and haptic understanding support the visual impression, while people with visual impairment have to depend on them. This chapter will address questions about how blind children learn to use touch for a better understanding of the environment. I will here focus on how tactile pictures in storybooks can support further discussions about everyday objects and episodes, and more abstract conversations. I will also address theories about tactile and multimodal reading processes that are involved in tactile decoding, and how they relate to visual perception and visual literacy. 

  • 12.
    Hedberg, Erika
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Meningen med meningsförändrande innovation inom robotikbranschen: En explorativ fallstudie2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 13.
    Kade, Daniel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ürey, H.
    Koç University, Turkey.
    Özcan, O.
    Koç University, Turkey.
    Supporting motion capture acting through a mixed reality application2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Current and future animations seek for more human-like motions to create believable animations for computer games, animated movies and commercial spots. A technology widely used technology is motion capture to capture actors’ movements which enrich digital avatars motions and emotions. However, a motion capture environment poses challenges to actors such as short preparation times and the need to highly rely on their acting and imagination skills. To support these actors, we developed a mixed reality application that allows showing digital environments while performing and being able to see the real and virtual world. We tested our prototype with 6 traditionally trained theatre and TV actors. As a result, the actors indicated that our application supported them getting into the demanded acting moods with less unrequired emotions. The acting scenario was also better understood with less need of explanation than when just discussing the scenario, as commonly done in theatre acting. 

  • 14.
    Karlsson, Linda
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Från bok till dataspel - Digital transformering för främjandet av läsförståelse hos barn2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 15.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    A review of mobile robotic telepresence2013In: Advances in Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1687-5893, E-ISSN 1687-5907, Vol. 2013, p. 902316-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile Robotic Telepresence (MRP) systems incorporate video conferencing equipment onto mobile robot devices which can be steered from remote locations. These systems, which are primarily used in the context of promoting social interaction between people, are becoming increasingly popular within certain application domains such as health care environments, independent living for the elderly and office environments. In this review, an overview of the various systems, application areas and challenges found in literature concerning mobile robotic telepresence is provided. The survey also proposes a set terminology for the field as there is currently a lack of standard terms for the different concepts related to MRP systems. Further, this review provides an outlook on the various research directions for developing and enhancing mobile robotic telepresence systems per se, as well as evaluating the interaction in laboratory and field settings. Finally, the survey outlines a number of design implications for the future of mobile robotic telepresence systems for social interaction.

  • 16.
    Kumlin, Tomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Biosignal Augmented Embodied Performance2017In: Proceedings of AudioMostly AM, 2017, article id a19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the phenomenology of embodiment based on research through design and reflection on the design of artefacts for augmenting embodied performance. We present three designs for musicians and a dancer; the designs rely on the artists’ mastery acquired from years of practice. Through the knowledge of the living body, their instruments —cello, flute and dance —are extensions of themselves; thus, we can explore technology with rich nuances and precision in corporeal schemas. With the help of Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of embodiment we present two perspectives for augmented embodied performance: the interactively enacted teacher, and the humanisation of technology.

  • 17.
    Lantz, Annika
    et al.
    University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Brav, Agneta
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Job Design for Learning in Work Groups2007In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 269-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - What is required of job design and production planning, if they are to result in a work group taking a self-starting approach and going beyond what is formally required of it? This paper aims to contribute to group research by testing a theoretical model of relations between job design on the one hand (captured as completeness, demand on responsibility, demand on cooperation, cognitive demand, and learning opportunities), and reflexivity and learning processes within natural work groups in industry on the other hand. Design/methodology/approach - The results are based on detailed task analyses and questionnaires from 40 work groups at the shop-floor level in manufacturing industry in Sweden. Findings - Job design and work routines show strong effects on reflexivity and learning processes. Four dimensions of job design - completeness, demand on cooperation, cognitive demand and learning opportunities - impact on reflexivity and learning processes. Job design correlates with social routines, and social routines with work routines. Practical implications - It is crucial to create a job design that putschallenging demands on the group if group processes are to be characterized by reflexivity and learning. Managers have a challenging task to provide both a space and a climate that supports reflexivity and learning. All functions affected by production planning need to be involved in job design to balance conflicts between productivity and innovation. Originality/value - Detailed task analysis is worthwhile as it captures aspects that are prerequisites for innovative groups not previously accounted for.

  • 18.
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Pining for the Materiality of Code2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new ubiquitous assistive devices have increased design space for innovative highly interactive design. Designers can no longer rely on a design process based on the known interaction idioms. This impedes the design process because the non-interactive material - sketches, scenarios, storyboards - does not provide designers the essential talk-backs needed to be able to make reliable assessments of the design characteristics. However, the interactive prototypes provide these talk-backs. How can we think of code as a design material? And how can the designer's repertoire expanded to include materials familiarity even to code?

  • 19.
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Surface Interaction to Support Collaborative Multimedia Live Performances2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes surface interaction applied to a research prototype used in real world longitudinal studies of collaborative multimedia live performance and rehearsal.

  • 20.
    Lindell, Rikard
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Kumlin, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Augmented Embodied Performance2017In: New Interfaces for Musical Expression NIME, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the phenomenology of embodiment based on research through design and reflection on the design of artefacts for augmenting embodied performance. We present three designs for highly trained musicians; the designs rely on the musicians’ mastery acquired from years of practice. Through the knowledge of the living body their instruments —saxophone, cello, and flute — are extensions of themselves; thus, we can explore technology with rich nuances and precision in corporeal schemas. With the help of Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of embodiment we present three hypotheses for augmented embodied performance: the extended artistic room, the interactively enacted teacher, and the humanisation of technology.

  • 21.
    Macchia, Teresa
    et al.
    University of Trento, Italy.
    D'Andrea, Vincenzo
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Mazzini, Roberto
    Giolli Cooperative, Italy.
    Di Fiore, Angela
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Exploring Theater of the Oppressed for Participatory Design2016In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2016, Vol. 2, p. 125-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design challenges refer to a difficulty of corresponding human and contextual complexity (i.e. needs, roles, and resources) in design practices. Such an issue calls for combining deep investigations with relevant design experiences. We propose a workshop for disentangling and discussing design practices by adopting the Theatre of the Oppressed techniques. These techniques allow enacting personal performances as well as the construction of a shared narrative about the participants' roles, needs, and resources. By this workshop, we aim to improve the participants' competence in understanding people's needs and developing a design solution accordingly. Finally, possible outcomes are: a special issue of an international peer reviewed journal, and/or a live performance that the conference attendees can enjoy as an experiential design occasion.

  • 22.
    Olby, Ida
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Nej, men vad dålig jag känner mig nu!: En studie om att utforma ett användarvänligt arbetsflöde för elektronisk signering2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A continuous increase of the accessibility to the Internet has lead to several instances where errands previously performed outside the home now can be carried out online as well, such as purchases of books, movies and clothes. Today, several companies offer services for the electronic signing of documents. In this thesis, I have chosen to study the workflow for such electronic signatures.

    The focus of the study is the company Comfacts solution, which uses SMS as part of the identification process. The steps that users go through to sign a document are not clearly defined. By studying the workflow of the system Comfact uses for electronic signage, I hope to bring insight of how to design a flow where users understand the process and feel that signing electronic documents online is a simple and straightforward process.

    The preliminary study consisted of a heuristic evaluation of the service, a competitor analysis of similar services and usability tests. The result showed that the main problem with the current solution is that certain words and sentences are structured in a way that the participants feel they don’t understand. This, combined with poor information on how the signing process works results in an overall unclear workflow. An unclear workflow will, in turn, cause the users to reflect upon the process itself more than should be necessary.

    By using the knowledge gained though theoretic studies and the preliminary study I developed a proposal for a new user interface. This interface was then tested by a new group of users, and I was able to demonstrate measurable improvements from the previous user interface.

    The conclusion of my study is that a workflow should be designed with the following aspects in mind, in order to better guide the users through the signing process:

    1) Design with the users in mind, not the underlying technology

    2) Provide clear information about what is going on

    3) Different elements should be visible

    4) The design should be consistent

    5) Use functions familiar to the users

    By designing according to these principles in the future, users exclaiming “Oh, I feel so stupid!” can be avoided, and more users feel “Aha, I understand!”

  • 23.
    Poderi, Giacomo
    et al.
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. University of Trento, Italy.
    Infrastructuring Collaboration2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Vahlstedt, Robin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Design av en interaktiv tjänst för en bred målgrupp2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    When you as a designer is commissioned to design a system where there are several different groups of users a complex situation emerge that the designer must handle. In this report,such a situationis derivedfrom start to finish where I as a designer,with the help of the method mock up,createsa system to Fagersta Golfclub, where the reader can follow along and learn how people thought about the design and see step by step how I as a designer has interpreted the users' reflections to achieve a suitable design. Also, an empirical study has been carriedout,where the target groups which are used during the design processare defined. After doing several tests on people who may use the system, I can conclude that the design does not at all look like the design I myself thought out from the beginning. It was challenging that the different target groups had such different views on how the design will look and work, and that I as a designer had to customize the design according to everyone's needs. When thedesignerwork with respect to several target groups, there are severalexperiences that the designer must take into accountin order to make the design well-made and appropriatefrom many different angles. If I compare the user side to the administrative side, the administrative side was considerably easier to design,since it was only one much more uniform target group concerned. Finally, the report ends with the results I got frommy work,which I hope may be helpful forsomeone who will build a system where there are several target groups involved.

  • 25.
    von Axelson, Jens
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Using concept modelling enables improvement system development2013In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Manufacturing Engineering and Technologies: Vol. 2 / [ed] Dr. Andreas Archenti & Dr. Antonio Maffei, 2013, p. 329-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many enterprises adapt new approaches, methods and tools in their improvement

    and development processes in their improvement system as a response to the

    increasing global competition. A problem is that terms and concepts mean different

    things to different people and in different contexts. Concept models could here serve

    as shared mental models and facilitates understanding, development and later

    implementation of a new present state of an improvement system. The objective has

    been to explore the concept modelling method in an operations management context.

    This paper presents two different cases on how to use concept models in research

    and development activities for improvement method and improvement system

    development. It is concluded that concept modelling seems to be a fruitful method of

    support in an improvement system development context.

  • 26.
    Whitaker, Jonathan
    et al.
    University of Richmond, USA.
    Ekman, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Thompson, Steven
    University of Richmond, USA.
    How Multinational Corporations Use Information Technology to Manage Global Operations2017In: Journal of Computer Information Systems, ISSN 0887-4417, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 112-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a generally acknowledged importance of information technology (IT) in enabling global strategy and a broad understanding of the manner in which IT enhances coordination and reduces cost, few studies have focused precisely on how multinational corporations (MNCs) use IT to facilitate globalization. To address this gap in the literature, we conduct a case study across four large MNCs, and use primary data to develop predictive propositions on the characteristics of products, processes, and customers that impact the ways in which MNCs use IT to manage their global operations.

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