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  • 1.
    Anbalagan, Anbarasan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    A passage to wastewater nutrient recovery units: Microalgal-Bacterial bioreactors2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the microalgal–bacterial process has been considered to be a very attractive engineering solution for wastewater treatment. However, it has not been widely studied in the context of conventional wastewater treatment design under Swedish conditions. The technology holds several advantages: as a CO2 sink, ability to withstand cold conditions, ability to grow under low light, fast settling without chemical precipitation, and reducing the loss of valuable nutrients (CO2, N2, N2O, PO4). The process also provides the option to be operated either as mainstream (treatment of municipal wastewater) or side stream (treatment of centrate from anaerobic digesters) to reduce the nutrient load of the wastewater. Furthermore, the application is not only limited to wastewater treatment; the biomass can be used to synthesise platform chemicals or biofuels and can be followed by recovery of ammonium and phosphate for use in agriculture.

    In the present study, the feasibility of applying the process in Swedish temperature and light conditions was investigated by implementing microalgae within the activated sludge process. In this context, the supporting operational and performance indicators (hydraulic retention time (HRT), sludge retention time (SRT) and nutrients removal) were evaluated to support naturally occurring consortia in photo-sequencing and continuous bioreactor configuration. Furthermore, CO2 uptake and light spectrum-mediated nutrient removal were investigated to reduce the impact on climate and the technical challenges associated with this type of system.

    The results identified effective retention times of 6 and 4 days (HRT = SRT) under limited lighting to reduce the electrical consumption. From the perspective of nitrogen removal, the process demands effective CO2 input either in the mainstream or side stream treatment. The incorporation of a vertical absorption column demonstrated effective CO2 mass transfer to support efficient nitrogen and phosphorus removal as a side stream treatment. However, the investigation of a continuous single-stage process as the mainstream showed a requirement for a lower SRT in comparison to semi-continuous operation due to faster settlability, regardless of inorganic carbon. Furthermore, the process showed an effective reduction of influent phosphorus and organic compounds (i.e. COD/TOC) load in the wastewater as a result of photosynthetic aeration. Most importantly, the operation was stable at the temperature equivalent of wastewater (12 and 13 ˚C), under different lighting (white, and red-blue wavelengths) and retention times (6 and 1.5 d HRT) with complete nitrification. Additionally, the biomass production was stable with faster settling properties without any physiochemical separation.

    The outcomes of this thesis on microalgal–bacterial nutrient removal demonstrates that (1) photosynthesis-based aeration at existing wastewater conditions under photo-sequential and continuous photobioreactor setup, (2) flocs with rapid settling characteristics at all studied retention times, (3) the possibility of increasing carbon supplementation to achieve higher carbon to nitrogen balance in the photobioreactor, and (4) most importantly, nitrification-based microalgal biomass uptake occurred at all spectral distributions, lower photosynthetic active radiation and existing wastewater conditions.

  • 2.
    de Maré, L
    et al.
    Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Velut, S
    Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ledung, Erika
    Mälardalen University, Department of Biology and Chemical Engineering.
    Cimander, C
    Novozymes Biopharma AB, Lund, Sweden .
    Norrman, Bo
    Mälardalen University, Department of Biology and Chemical Engineering.
    Karlsson, E
    Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden.
    Holst, O
    Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagander, P
    Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    A cultivation technique for E. coli fed-batch cultivations operating close to the maximum oxygen transfer capacity of the reactor2005In: Biotechnology Letters, ISSN 0141-5492, Vol. 27, no 14, p. 983-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cultivation strategy combining the advantages of temperature-limited fed-batch and probing feeding control is presented. The technique was evaluated in fed-batch cultivations with E. coli BL21(DE3) producing xylanase in a 3 liter bioreactor. A 20% increase in cell mass was achieved and the usual decrease in specific enzyme activity normally observed during the late production phase was diminished with the new technique. The method was further tested by growing E. coli W3110 in a larger bioreactor (50 l). It is a suitable cultivation technique when the O2 transfer capacity of the reactor is reached and it is desired to continue to produce the recombinant protein.

  • 3.
    Jonfelt, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zambrano, Jesús
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Lindblom, Erik
    Stockholm Vatten, Sweden.
    Nehrenheim, Emma
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Key parameters for modelling Anammox process with N2O emissions2017In: French Federation of Biotechnology - Bioreactors Symposium 2017: Innovative approaches in bioreactors design and operation, France, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a sensitivity analysis and a calibration were applied to a recent published model used to replicate N2O emissions in an Anammox process of a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). The model used in this study was designed to replicate a one-stage nitrification-Anammox system in a MBBR at Hammarby-Sjöstad pilot plant (Stockholm, Sweden), whichtreats of anaerobic digestion liquor. The aeration was intermittently (45/15 minutes - on/off). During the aeration, a 1.5 mg/L DO set-point was set. Three main measurements wereobtained: NH4 in water, N2O in both water and gas phase.The sensitivity analysis was done via the one-at-a-time method, where one parameter at a timeis changed (in our case, 10%) from its nominal value and the model output is quantified. Next,the most sensitive parameters were used in the model calibration. Results indicate that the biofilm porosity (η [-]), biofilm density (ρ [gTS/m3]), maximum biofilmthickness (Lmax [mm]) and boundary layer thickness of the biofilm (L0 [μm]) were the mostsensitive parameters of the model. These parameters performed the model calibration.

  • 4.
    Nordlander, Eva
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH.
    Modeling of a full-scale biogas plant using a dynamic neural network2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Schwede, Sebastian
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Lindmark, Johan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Klintenberg, Patrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Jääskelainen, A
    Savonia Univ Appl Sci, Environm Engn, Kuopio, Finland.
    Suhonen, A.
    Savonia Univ Appl Sci, Environm Engn, Kuopio, Finland.
    Laatikainen, R.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Sch Pharm, Kuopio, Finland.
    Hakalehto, E.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Sch Pharm, Kuopio, Finland.
    Using slaughterhouse waste in a biochemical-based biorefinery – results from pilot scale tests2017In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, p. 1275-1284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel biorefinery concept was piloted using protein-rich slaughterhouse waste, chicken manureand straw as feedstocks. The basic idea was to provide a proof of concept for the production ofplatform chemicals and biofuels from organic waste materials at non-septic conditions. Thedesired biochemical routes were 2,3-butanediol and acetone–butanol fermentation. The resultsshowed that hydrolysis resulted only in low amounts of easily degradable carbohydrates.However, amino acids released from the protein-rich slaughterhouse waste were utilized andfermented by the bacteria in the process. Product formation was directed towards acidogeniccompounds rather than solventogenic products due to increasing pH-value affected by ammoniarelease during amino acid fermentation. Hence, the process was not effective for 2,3-butanediolproduction, whereas butyrate, propionate,γ-aminobutyrate and valerate were predominantlyproduced. This offered fast means for converting tedious protein-rich waste mixtures intoutilizable chemical goods. Furthermore, the residual liquid from the bioreactor showedsignificantly higher biogas production potential than the corresponding substrates. Thecombination of the biorefinery approach to produce chemicals and biofuels with anaerobicdigestion of the residues to recover energy in form of methane and nutrients that can beutilized for animal feed production could be a feasible concept for organic waste utilization.

  • 6.
    Skvaril, Jan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Applications of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in biomass energy conversion processes: A review2017In: Applied spectroscopy reviews (Softcover ed.), ISSN 0570-4928, E-ISSN 1520-569X, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 675-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomass used in energy conversion processes is typically characterized by high variability, making its utilization challenging. Therefore, there is a need for a fast and non-destructive method to determine feedstock/product properties and directly monitor process reactors. The near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique together with advanced data analysis methods offers a possible solution. This review focuses on the introduction of the NIRS method and its recent applications to physical, thermochemical, biochemical and physiochemical biomass conversion processes represented mainly by pelleting, combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, as well as biogas, bioethanol, and biodiesel production. NIRS has been proven to be a reliable and inexpensive method with a great potential for use in process optimization, advanced control, or product quality assurance.

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