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  • 1.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Wolff, Rolf
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Eco-efficiency and dematerialization: Scenarios for new industrial logics in recycling industries, automobile and household appliances1999In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 31-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental field has been continuously overloaded with new concepts in the area of environmental impact such as environmental space, ecological backpack, carrying capacity, ecological footprint, dematerialization and eco-efficiency. The latter two concepts have a particular relevance to corporate environmental management. This article discusses the concepts of dematerialization and eco-efficiency with respect to their implications for industry logics. It is based on a project that was initiated by the Swedish EPA. Within the project we used the scenario technique to explore the future industry logics of recycling industries related to the automobile industry and household appliances. One scenario, 'business as usual', indicates a focus on products with incremental improvements and a stepwise departure from today's practices. The other scenario, 'dematerialization', indicates a focus on functions and needs, and a significant departure from today's practices. Concluding from the empirical analysis of present industry logics, based on interviews and data analysis in specific industries, we realized that changes in industry logics and business systems are inevitable, if industry takes a responsibility for the whole life cycle seriously. Accordingly, we propose the transformation of business systems as a research agenda for the future. Such-an agenda follows ecologically motivated transformation andtranslation processes throughout the whole system of actor networks and action nets of society and creates an enhanced understanding of the emerging processes of corporate environmental management. It also considers different institutional arrangements between those actors that constitute the system as a whole.

  • 2.
    Hellstrand, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    On the value of land2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of sustainable development is once again moving the production factor land into the focus of economic theory and practise. There are three production factors, capital, labour and land. Land is a synonym to ecosystems. During the major part of the 20th century land in economic theory has been handled as a peripheral issue. The sustainability context implies a challenge to take land in proper consideration. That means to in an adequate way consider system characteristics that result in complex systems, such as thresholds, resilience, irreversibilities, and interdependencies between systems and system levels.

     The thesis examines

    • how land can be understood and handled in the context of a sustainable development,
    • the relations between land and society on a conceptual level and in operative terms,
    • the relations between system levels and between the three sustainability dimensions ecological, economic and social,
    • the importance of agriculture and animal production in a sustainable development. 

    The major findings are that in contexts such as economically profitable and natural resource-efficient milk production; methods to measure sustainability performance of production systems generally; and societal strategies for management of natural resources that support economic and social development within ecological sustainability limits, three “laws” need to be handled appropriate: Liebig’s “Law” of the minimum, Shelford´s “Law” of tolerance, and the “Law” of diminishing return in biological-ecological productions systems.

    The thesis identifies examples within dairy sciences, systems ecology, and engineering sciences that affect or may affect policies in real world systems from local to global level that can be substantially improved. In order to suggest relevant measures a tool-kit supporting a sustainable development have been generated, integrating contributions from agricultural sciences, systems ecology, economic theory, economic geography, applied environmental sciences and theories of complex systems. The thesis summarises around 30 years of professional experiences mainly within advanced consultancy, during which this tool-kit has been developed and applied. Evaluation of some applications afterwards shows relevance. For some of the examples analysed in the thesis, found weaknesses are such that global food security literally is threatened within one to twenty years.

  • 3.
    Johnstone, L.
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet, Sweden.
    Svärd-Sandin, E.
    Lindh, Cecilia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    The Scandinavian cooperative advantage?: A mixed method approach to highlight the influence of contextual conditions for environmental CSR uptake2017In: International Journal of Environment and Sustainable Development (IJESD), ISSN 1474-6778, E-ISSN 1478-7466, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 336-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multilateral actor-to-actor (A2A) networks, exhibited and commonplace in Scandinavia, are considered key to effective environmental CSR implementation and organisational success. This research investigates the proposed Scandinavian cooperative advantage within the construction industry in order to better understand: A) if the contextual conditions of a country affect environmental CSR uptake; b) if construction companies exhibit environmental CSR-practices differently in discrete contexts; c) the role of stakeholder collaborations for explicit (soft-law) environmental CSR uptake and competitive advantage. With Sweden and Scotland as representative examples of two different contexts within and beyond Scandinavia, the results indicate that the contextual conditions of a country affect the perceptions, and likelihood, of environmental CSR uptake from both organisational and customer perspectives. However, it remains unclear as to whether stakeholder collaborations and A2A networks, traditional within Scandinavian societies, actually influence environmental CSR uptake more so than in external contexts. © 2017 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 4.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Development of collaborative green lean production systems2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with development of lean and green production systems from an action research point of view. The studies focus on Swedish-based automotive and vehicle industries and their aims to integrate sustainable thinking and environmental care into their operations management.

    Starting from operations management in manufacturing and corporate sustainable development, the research is built on how to integrate these two views into one production system. The systematic structure of a multiple-target improvement process with methodologies and tools designed to achieve the sustainability vision has been studied. Since lean as well as green production is based on the entire value chain, the research has gone beyond legal company limits and included the collaborative efforts between suppliers and customers in the value chain.

    The thesis includes six papers and describes approaches on how to implement integration, how to structure and integrate improvement management systems, how to set up an integrated monitoring and control system for the business and how to organise and redesign green lean tools and methodologies to support collaboration towards common targets.

    The results can be used for exploration and hypothesis formulation for further studies and development of integrated production systems and collaboration systems. The thesis helps answering how to integrate and implement company-specific green lean production systems.

  • 5.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Amprazis, Pernilla
    Waste flow mapping: Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Lean and green integration into production system models – experiences from Swedish industry2014In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 85, p. 180-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on integration of operations management, specifically production system models with environmental management and related issues such as quality and safety. Based on knowledge concerning lean-based improvement programmes for company-specific production systems (XPS) and integration between formal management systems, such as ISO 9001 and 14001, industrial practices from integrating management systems with the XPS were studied. A literature-based comparison between formal management systems and XPS is made, indicating integration potentials. The empirical research is an analysis of five vehicle and automotive companies in which various efforts have been made to integrate their management systems with their XPS. The results show that although conscious steps have been taken since the introduction of ISO 14001 in integrating environmental management into everyday operations, there are still obstacles to overcome. To fully include sustainability aspects, the characteristics of the improvement systems have to be adapted and extended. One barrier to extended integration is the lack of integration strategy. There is further a lack of sustainability metrics and adaptation of improvement methods to push companies' operational performance. In addition, organisational issues still arise concerning the responsibility and ownership of environmental management in relation to operations. Based on these results it is concluded that processes for integration are recommended; however, each organisation needs to consider its operations, corporate culture and business opportunities of its environmental management. Still, incorporating environmental management systems into XPS is seen as an effective way of establishing company commonality in continuous improvement, resulting in holistic understanding and improved organisation performance.

  • 7.
    Shah, Bilal Ahmed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Development and Implementation of Environmental Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) in Swedish Manufacturing Industry2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional manufacturing industry have developed a linear production path that involves resource extraction, energy usage, emissions released to air and water, and waste produced at volumes and rates that places increasing burden on the natural environment. These traditional manufacturing organizations have mostly viewed environmental activities separately from their core business operations. Today, organizations are shifting their manufacturing approach. There is a significant potential to reduce the energy use, emissions released, resource consumption and wastes produced through sustainable initiatives. Using environmental key performance indicators (KPIs) is one emerging sustainability initiative. Environmental KPIs depict the vast quantity of environmental data of a firm in a comprehensive and concise manner, applying mostly to set absolute material and energy data in relation to other variables in order to increase the informational value of quantitative data. In this thesis work, literature review and empirical study was carried out to find out the significant factors and the major challenges during the development and implementation of environmental key performance indicators (KPIs). A case study in four Swedish manufacturing companies was carried out to collect primary data which was later compared with literature review. The thesis work also highlights the management system used to implement environmental KPIs. 

  • 8.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    MATERIAL EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT IN MANUFACTURING2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Material efficiency is a key solution to provide a reduction in the total environmental impact of global manufacturing, which contributes to avoid generating larger volumes of industrial waste, to reduce extracting and consuming ever more resources and to decrease energy demand and carbon emissions. However, the area of material efficiency in manufacturing has been under-researched and related knowledge is limited.

    The research objective of this thesis is to contribute to the existing body of knowledge regarding material efficiency in manufacturing - to increase understanding, describe the existing situation and develop support for improvement. This thesis focuses on value of process and residual materials in material efficiency: to increase homogenous quality of generated waste with higher segregation rate, decreasing the amount of material becoming waste and reduce total virgin raw material consumption without influencing the function and quality of a product or process.

    To achieve the objective, material efficiency strategies, existing state of material efficiency in manufacturing and barriers that avert higher material efficiency improvement have been investigated. The results are supported by four structured literature reviews and two [MW1] empirical multiple case studies at large global manufacturing companies in Sweden, mainly automotive. Empirical studies include observations, interviews, waste stream mapping, waste sorting analysis, environmental report reviews and walkthroughs in companies to determine the material efficiency and industrial waste management systems.

    The empirical results revealed that material efficiency improvement potential of further waste segregation to gain economic and environmental benefits is still high. Determining different waste segments and relative fractions along with calculating material efficiency performance measurements facilitate improvements in material efficiency. In addition to attempts for waste generation reduction, avoiding blending and correct segregation of different waste fractions is an essential step towards material efficiency. The next step is to improve the value of waste fractions i.e. having more specific cost-effective fractions. Waste Flow Mapping proves to be an effective practical tool to be utilized at manufacturing companies in order to check and explore the improvement opportunities.

    In addition, a number of barriers that hinder material efficiency was identified. The most influential material efficiency barriers are Budgetary, Information, Management and Employees. The majority of identified material efficiency barriers are internal, originate inside the company itself and are dependent upon the manufacturing companies’ characteristics. As a result, management and employees’ attitude, environmental knowledge and environmental motivation, as well as their internal communication and information sharing, and companies’ core value and vision are the enablers for material efficiency improvement.

  • 9.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sustainable Manufacturing through Material Efficiency Management2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Material efficiency contributes to reduced industrial waste volumes, reduced extraction and consumption of virgin raw materials, increased waste segregation, decreased energy demand, and reduced carbon emissions, thereby generally mitigating the environmental impact of the manufacturing industry. However, the area of material efficiency in manufacturing is under-researched, and related knowledge is limited particularly at individual manufacturing sites and lower levels. These levels are crucial to achieve improved material efficiency, as a great amount of material is consumed and waste flows are generated on manufacturing shop floors. There are still gaps in both literature and industrial practice regarding material efficiency in manufacturing, where materials are consumed to make products and great volumes of waste are generated simultaneously.

    The research objective of this dissertation is to contribute to existing knowledge on management and improvement of material efficiency in manufacturing. To achieve this objective, three research questions were formulated to investigate material efficiency barriers, material efficiency tools and strategies, and material efficiency performance measurement. The results are supported by four structured and extensive literature reviews and also by five empirical case studies conducted at a total of fourteen Swedish global manufacturing companies. These empirical studies entail observations, interviews, waste stream mapping, waste sorting analyses, environmental report reviews, and company walkthroughs.

    A number of material efficiency barriers in manufacturing were identified, categorized and clustered to facilitate an understanding of material efficiency to effectively mitigate the barriers. The clustered barriers cited most often in the literature are budgetary, information, technology, management, vision and culture, uncertainty, engineering, and employees. In the empirical studies, vision and culture, technology, and uncertainty were replaced by communication. Most of the material efficiency barriers identified appear to be internal and are dependent on the manufacturing company’s characteristics.

    A number of tools and strategies were identified and some were used to assess, manage, and improve material efficiency in the manufacturing companies studied. Empirical studies indicated that certain criteria are necessary to select and use operational tools. These criteria include being hands-on, time efficient, based on lean principles, easy to use and learn, visualized, promoting engagement, and being connected to a predetermined goal. These criteria are essential for mutual understanding, intra-organizational communication, performance improvement, and becoming a learning organization.

    A model for a material efficiency performance measurement system was proposed that included the most common material efficiency-related key performance indicators from literature and empirical findings. The model divides material and waste flows into four main categories: productive input materials, auxiliary input materials, products, and residual output materials. The four main categories should be measured equally to realize material efficiency performance improvements in an operation.

    This research contributes to the research area of material efficiency and sheds light on different inter-connected aspects, which affect one another and contribute to assess, manage and improve material efficiency in a manufacturing context. The studied conducted and the results are presented in five appended papers. 

  • 10.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IV, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IV, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency measurement: Swedish case studies2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 181, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major factor in the continued deterioration of the global environment is unsustainable management of resources that includes the type and quantity of resources consumed and manufactured as well as the subsequent generation and treatment of wasted materials. Improved material efficiency (ME) in manufacturing is key to reducing resource consumption levels and improving waste management initiatives. However, ME must be measured, and related goals must be broken down into performance indicators for manufacturing companies. This paper aims to improve ME in manufacturing using a structured model for ME performance measurements. We present a set of ME key performance indicators (ME-KPIs) at the individual company and lower operational levels based on empirical studies and a structured literature review. Our empirical findings are based on data collected on the performance indicators and material and waste flows of nine manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The proposed model categorizes ME-KPIs into the following categories: productive input materials, auxiliary input materials, output products, and residual output materials. These categories must be measured equally to facilitate the measurement, assessment, improvement and reporting of material consumption and waste generation in a manufacturing context. Required qualities for ME-KPI suggested in literature are also discussed, and missing indicators are identified. Most of the identified ME-KPIs measure quality- and cost-related factors, while end-of-life scenarios, waste segregation and the environmental effects of waste generation and material consumption are not equally measured. Additionally, ME-KPIs must also be connected to pre-determined goals and that defining or revising ME-KPIs requires communication with various external and internal actors to increase employees’ awareness and engagement.

  • 11.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments, industrialization and mass production have triggered rapid increase of raw material consumption and great volumes of industrial waste, while industrial waste management infrastructure has not been developed with the same pace. One mean in striving for industrial waste management is the management of process materials. This paper introduces the performance measure sorting rate for each segment of waste material, along with a method for sorting analysis to help improving overall material efficiency and industrial waste management. The results revealed that more than 50% of combustible bins’ content could be separately segregated as plastic, wood, paper, cardboard and bio-degradable.

  • 12.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Anna-runa, Kristinsdottir
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: a case study2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies—Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)—to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

  • 13.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kurdve, M.
    Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden; Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Using the green performance map: Towards material efficiency measurement2018In: Operations Management and Sustainability: New Research Perspectives, Palgrave Macmillan , 2018, p. 247-269Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous environmental studies indicate several barriers to circular economy and material efficiency including a lack of detailed methodologies for manufacturing improvement in terms of environmental and operational performances to measure, monitor and evaluate material consumption and waste generation. A lean and green tool, the green performance map (GPM), is an appropriate tool for different environmental initiatives including training, improvement, reporting and development. Through literature review and multiple case study methodology, this chapter presents the current application of GPM in industry and its usage to regularly measure and monitor material efficiency measurements on different levels and to remove barriers to improved material efficiency. 

  • 14.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using the Green Performance Map: towards material efficiency measurementIn: Sustainable Operations Management / [ed] Luitzen De Boer and Poul Houman Andersen, UK: Palgrave MacmillanChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing: swedish evidence on potential, barriers and strategiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Importance of higher waste segregation for improving material efficiency.• Presentation of barriers towards improved material efficiency in a new categorization.• Material efficiency barriers are mainly internal.• Lack of material efficiency strategy implementation in the manufacturing companies.

  • 16.
    Stigson, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Haikola, S.
    Linköping University, Sweden .
    Hansson, A.
    Linköping University, Sweden .
    Buhr, K.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prospects for Swedish acceptance of carbon dioxide storage in the Baltic Sea: Learning from other energy projects2016In: Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2152-3878, ISSN 21523878, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 188-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As initiatives are taken in Sweden to evaluate the geological potential for carbon dioxide storage in the adjacent Baltic Sea, experiences from elsewhere may provide lessons about perceptions of and potential opposition toward carbon capture and storage (CCS). A comprehensive analysis of storage feasibility needs to include the issue of social acceptance. The knowledge of CCS is low in Sweden however and there are no Swedish CCS projects to learn from. This paper therefore draws on lessons from other large-scale energy projects that are embedded in similar Baltic Sea contexts to complement lessons on CCS acceptance provided in the literature. The aim of this study is to facilitate an understanding of acceptance of potential future CO2 storage initiatives in the Swedish Baltic Sea region and to analyze what contextual factors are likely to be determinative of the outcome of these and similar projects. The study identifies climate change as one such key contextual factor, which can often be used both to support and oppose a large-scale energy project. Furthermore, the study finds that there are perceptions of uncertainties regarding the regulatory framework that need to be adressed in order to facilitate the planning of CCS projects in the region.

  • 17.
    Syed, Wajahat Ali
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kali, Rahul Raj
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Environmental KPI's for management and improvements in manufacturing: Increase employee sustainability commitment for Lean and Green production at ABB2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Problem Statement: How does ABB Ludvika facilitate sustainable development in technology, green production with green KPI’s? The purpose of the thesis is to develop a general concept of environmental KPIs for management and improvement in manufacturing.  Environmental KPIs can be a main driving factor for work improvement and they will be managed for the continuous improvement in company. The concentration is on the shop floor level including production management (on team levels and department levels). The capability of using different (standardized) KPIs for management and control and more flexible/dynamic KPIs on a local level for enhancing improvements on a daily basis should be investigated. This concept will be clarified to be understood by researchers and companies if they want to implement it. The aim of this thesis is to attain sustainability and to suggest possible gaps between the point of view of researchers and practitioners. The other objective is to find out the key factors involved in production processes that have significant effect on sustainable, and hence the environment. 

  • 18.
    Tan, S. T.
    et al.
    Process System Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.
    Hashim, H.
    Process System Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.
    Lee, C. T.
    Process System Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.
    Lim, J. S.
    Process System Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.
    Ho, W. S.
    Process System Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    SMART: An Integrated Planning and Decision Support Tool for Solid Waste Management2014In: Computer Aided Chemical Engineering, ISSN 1570-7946, Vol. 33, p. 271-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solid waste management (SWM) system combined waste streams, waste collection, treatment and disposal methods are critically important to a regional, to achieve environmental economic and societal benefits. Decision-makers often have to rely on optimization models to examine a cost effective, environmentally sound waste management alternative. This paper presents a new systematic framework for long term effective planning and scheduling of SWM. This framework has been converted into software called Solid Waste Management Resource Recovery Tool (SMART). SMART is a first-of-a-kind SWM tool to facilitate the tradeoffs analysis between technical, economical, and environmental at national, regional, state, province, or community level. This simple tool is useful for decision makers for the selection of MSW technology including incineration, landfill, composting and recycling are while minimising the costs and meet CO2 reductions target. The developed tool was applied in Iskandar Malaysia as a case study.

  • 19.
    Thompson, S.
    et al.
    University of Richmond, Richmond, United States.
    Ekman, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Raggio, R.
    University of Richmond, Richmond, United States.
    The green fingerprint: Decreasing energy consumption with decision support systems2015In: 2015 Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable business development is a challenge that requires both organizational change and changes to individual behavior. We report on the design and implementation of an app-based decision support system designed to promote environmentally responsible behavior among individuals in a B2B setting. The app, known as the "Green Fingerprint" was designed in collaboration with a commercial real estate firm and subsequently deployed in several tenant sites in the greater Stockholm area. We measured energy productivity defined as revenue in Swedish Kronor/kilowatt hours of electricity consumption. Over a two year period participating firms were able to significantly increase energy productivity by as much as much as 100% as a result of direct feedback and adopting conservation techniques recommended by the system. Increased energy productivity resulted in annual energy costs that were substantially less than if energy productivity had not increased.

  • 20.
    Wang, Chuan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Zeng, Lei
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, Department of Public Technology.
    Lundgren, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Potential Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction in China by Using Swedish Bioenergy Technologies2006In: GHGT-8 Conference, 19-22 June 2006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, an increased attention has been given by industries and governments from industrialized as well as developing countries to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through the clean development mechanism (CDM). As China has increasing demands on bioenergy and Sweden has good practices and competence in developing and utilizing bioenergy technologies, this paper studies the resulting consequence if implementing Swedish bioenergy technologies in China. The potential CO2 emission reduction from each technology in China is studied. A few priority areas for future CDM projects selection by using Swedish technologies are recommended.

  • 21.
    Wennersten, Ronald
    et al.
    Shandong University, China.
    Sun, Qie
    Shandong University, China.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    The Future Potential for Carbon Capture and Storage in Climate Change Mitigation: An overview from perspectives of technology, economy and risk2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 103, p. 724-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the recent IPCC reports, the effects from anthropogenic climate change effects are becoming more serious and actions more urgent. The global mean concentration of CO2, the most important Greenhouse Gas (GHG), in the atmosphere is now close to 400 ppm. The most comprehensive research efforts concerning safe levels propose that we should strive to keep the atmospheric concentration of CO2below 350 ppm. This is also a more transparent global goal than using effects in the components of the climate system. Most scenarios show that the combustion of fossil fuels will increase in the future, while the development of renewables is still too marginal to stop this growth. The possibility that countries will leave fossil resources underground does not seem realistic. The only options in the short run to halt emissions of CO2 are the large-scale application of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in combination with increased energy efficiency. In the long run, we have to radically transform our societal metabolism towards greater resource efficiency, where renewables can play a more important role. The main barriers for implementation of CCS on a large scale are not technical, but economic and social. As long as the costs for emitting CO2 are much lower than implementing CCS technology, there will not be a market-driven development of CCS. A major challenge for CCS will be to achieve wide public acceptance, since this will also affect the future political attitude to it. This will require an open communication about safety aspects early in the planning phase, where it can be shown that safety issues can be handled, even in the event of major leaks of CO2. To assume a low probability of accidents is not a feasible way forward in the communication process. The future concerning CO2 emissions will be determined very much by actions of the biggest emitters. The developed countries have already emitted a large amount of CO2 and must now take a step forward to show that they are willing to invest in CCS technology. At this stage, it is reasonable to expect developed countries to take a leading role in developing the CCS technology on a large-scale. It is highly probable that developing countries like China will follow this path in the near future, since they have a clear ambition to take a lead in climate change mitigation in the long run and to avoid blame for a deteriorating environment.

  • 22.
    Zambrano, Jesús
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Nehrenheim, Emma
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Light and duty cycle optimization of a photo-bioreactor in batch mode2017In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 105, p. 773-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is focused on optimizing the amount of light duty cycle of a photo-bioreactor operating in batch mode. The mathematical model used is confined to one dissolved substrate, one biomass (algae), one internal cell quota, and the irradiance for photo-acclimated culture. The model has been previously published and validated with experimental data. The following optimization problem is studied: minimize the effluent substrate concentration subject to: maximum and minimum amount of light to be used, the time of the light/dark illumination and the total time of the batch experiment. Analytical solution for this optimization problem seems difficult to obtain. However, numerical results obtained from simulations show that it is possible to find solutions which satisfy the problem requirements.

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