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Reconnecting with oneself while struggling between life and death: The phenomenon of recovery as experienced by persons at risk of suicide
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. (Care, Recovery and Health)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8306-0521
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. (Care, Recovery and Health)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3307-6779
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Uppsala University, Sweden.
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. UiT-Norges Arktiske Universitet, Norway. (Care, Recovery and Health)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9714-577X
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 26, no 2, 200-207 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The body of knowledge regarding health and recovery as experienced by patients at risk of suicide is limited. More research is needed into the meaning of recovery and what strengthens the desire to live. The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of recovery in a context of nursing care as experienced by persons at risk of suicide. In line with a reflective lifeworld research approach, 14 patients from a psychiatric clinic in Sweden participated in phenomenon-oriented interviews. Data were analyzed to describe the essence of the phenomenon. The results reveal that the phenomenon of recovery means ‘reconnecting with oneself while struggling between life and death’. Three meaning constituents emerged: being in an expressive space and giving voice to oneself, regaining dignity through nurturing connectedness, and finding a balance in the tension between life and death. In conclusion, the meaning of recovery is to experience the ability to manage one's own life. Professional caregivers need to acknowledge patients' lifeworlds, in a way that enable patients to experience themselves as capable of managing their own lives. Professional caregivers should also facilitate the involvement of supportive relatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 26, no 2, 200-207 p.
Keyword [en]
attempted suicide, mental health nursing, phenomenology, psychiatry, recovery
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-32590DOI: 10.1111/inm.12249ISI: 000398124700011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84994071505OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-32590DiVA: diva2:958322
Available from: 2016-09-06 Created: 2016-08-19 Last updated: 2017-05-19Bibliographically approved

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Sellin, LindaAsp, MargaretaWiklund Gustin, Lena
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