mdh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
To be strategically struggling against resignation: The lived experience of being cared for in forensic psychiatric care
Linnæus University, School of Health and Caring Sciences, Lifeworld Centre for Health, Care and Learning, Sweden.
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
Linnæus University, School of Health and Caring Sciences, Lifeworld Centre for Health, Care and Learning, Sweden.
2012 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 11, 743-751 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

To be referred to care in forensic psychiatric services can be seen as one of the most comprehensive encroachments society can impose upon a person's life, as it entails a limitation of the individual's freedom with no time limit. This study focuses upon patients' experiences of their life situation in forensic psychiatric wards. Using a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach founded in phenomenology, we analysed 11 qualitative interviews with patients cared for on a maximum security unit in a Swedish forensic psychiatric service. Results show how forensic psychiatric care can be non-caring with only moments of good care, from the patient's perspective. By using different strategies, the patients attempt to adapt to the demands of the caregivers in order to gain privileges. At the same time the patients are lacking meaningful and close relationships and long to get away from the system of forensic care. Being cared for entails struggling against an approaching overwhelming sense of resignation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 33, no 11, 743-751 p.
Keyword [en]
adult, apathy, article, attitude to health, behavior, emotion, escape behavior, female, forensic psychiatry, health personnel attitude, human, legal aspect, long term care, male, mental disease, nurse patient relationship, nursing, patient satisfaction, prisoner, psychologic test, psychological aspect, punishment, qualitative research, quality of life, uncertainty, Attitude of Health Personnel, Commitment of Mentally Ill, Emotions, Escape Reaction, Humans, Interview, Psychological, Long-Term Care, Mental Disorders, Nurse-Patient Relations, Power (Psychology), Prisoners, Young Adult
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31688DOI: 10.3109/01612840.2012.704623Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84869192682OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-31688DiVA: diva2:932933
Available from: 2016-06-02 Created: 2016-06-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sjögren, Reet
By organisation
Health and Welfare
In the same journal
Issues in Mental Health Nursing
Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 24 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf