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Introducing Connected Vehicles [Connected Vehicles]
Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Swedish VT/COM/IT Chapter, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6497-4099
2015 (English)In: IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine, ISSN 1556-6072, E-ISSN 1556-6080, Vol. 10, no 1, 23-27, 31 p.Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

he term connected vehicles refers to applications, services, and technologies that connect a vehicle to its surroundings. Adopting a definition similar to that of AUTO Connected Car News, a connected vehicle is basically the presence of devices in a vehicle that connect to other devices within the same vehicle and/or devices, networks, applications, and services outside the vehicle. Applications include everything from traffic safety and efficiency, infotainment, parking assistance, roadside assistance, remote diagnostics, and telematics to autonomous self-driving vehicles and global positioning systems (GPS). Typically, vehicles that include interactive advanced driver-assistance systems (ADASs) and cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) can be regarded as connected. Connected-vehicle safety applications are designed to increase situation awareness and mitigate traffic accidents through vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications. ADAS technology can be based on vision/camera systems, sensor technology, vehicle data networks, V2V, or V2I systems. Features may include adaptive cruise control, automate braking, incorporate GPS and traffic warnings, connect to smartphones, alert the driver to hazards, and keep the driver aware of what is in the blind spot. V2V communication technology could mitigate traffic collisions and improve traffic congestion by exchanging basic safety information such as location, speed, and direction between vehicles within range of each other. It can supplement active safety features, such as forward collision warning and blind-spot detection. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 10, no 1, 23-27, 31 p.
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30485DOI: 10.1109/MVT.2015.2390920ISI: 000350739200005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84923871506OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-30485DiVA: diva2:885969
Available from: 2015-12-21 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2015-12-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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