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Environmental Management in Manufacturing Industries
Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0662-539X
Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5963-2470
2015 (English)In: Handbook of Clean Energy Systems / [ed] Jinyue Yan, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd , 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The environmental concern requires manufacturing industries to direct resources and effort toward strategies and activities that help reducing their overall environmental impact. Using environmental management systems (EMSs) such as ISO 14001 or similar is common. However, as the EMSs do not put absolute requirements on the organization's environmental performance, it is still up to each manufacturing company to set the ambition level. As part of the EMSs, the identification of the environmental aspects to be dealt with during the operations phase could be supported by an industrial applicable method called Green Performance Map (GPM), engaging the employees on all levels to work with those environmental improvements they could impact. While most manufacturing companies are implementing the concept of lean production, it is advantageous to integrate the environmental improvement work into the existing lean infrastructure with, for example, daily management systems and scheduled activities for continuous improvement. Another approach discussed in the article is the need for emphasizing the design of the production system as an upstream activity that has fundamental impact on the environmental performance downstream, that is, in the operations phase. When designing new production equipment or renovating existing equipment, the opportunities to incorporate more energy- and resource-efficient solutions are much greater and cheaper compared to investing in such solutions afterward during serial production. Arguably, a combined design and operations approach is necessary in order to achieve a complete green mindset that will guide the environmental actions on both the strategic, tactical, and operational levels. Managing the environmental tasks is part of the overall strive toward lean and clean energy systems in manufacturing industry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd , 2015.
Keyword [en]
manufacturing industry, environmental performance, design and operations of production systems, Green Performance Map, environmental management system, environmental improvements, lean and green, environmental KPIs, resource efficiency, energy efficiency
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30014DOI: 10.1002/9781118991978.hces092ISBN: 978-1-118-38858-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-30014DiVA: diva2:885718
Projects
XPRESEQUIP: User-Supplier integration in production equipment design
Available from: 2015-12-20 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2015-12-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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Language
  • de-DE
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