mdh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A randomized controlled trial of exposure in vivo for patients with spinal pain reporting fear of work-related activities
Örebro University, Sweden. (Center for Health and Medical Psychology and School of Law, Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden)
Örebro University, Sweden.
Örebro University, Sweden.
Örebro University, Sweden. (Center for Health , Örebro University, Sweden)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3532-7938
Show others and affiliations
2008 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 12, no 6, 722-730 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: 

Pain-related fear is related to disability in persistent pain conditions. Exposure treatment has been reported to be of great benefit in replicated single case experiments.

AIM: 

To evaluate the effects of exposure in vivo on fear and function in patients with persistent pain and work disability.

METHOD: 

We recruited 46 patients suffering from long-term back pain and reduced function, who also were deemed fearful according to standardized measures. Participants were randomized into either an exposure plus usual treatment or waiting list control plus usual treatment group. After the waiting period the control group crossed over and received the exposure treatment.

RESULTS: 

Between group comparisons showed a significantly better result for the exposure group on function, but not for fear or pain and effect sizes were modest (function=.6; fear=.4; pain=.1). When the control group crossed over to treatment significant treatment effects were noted for fear and function. For all patients treated, the pre to post-treatment effect sizes were large (function=.7; fear=1.1; pain=.9). There were 12 dropouts (8 in exposure and 4 in the control) during the first treatment phase and an additional 4 when the control group crossed over to exposure.

CONCLUSIONS: 

Compared to a group receiving usual treatment and waiting for exposure, the exposure in vivo group demonstrated a significantly larger improvement on function. Overall exposure had moderate effects on function, fear and pain intensity. We conclude that exposure may be important in treatment, but is not recommended as a "stand alone" adjunct to usual treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 12, no 6, 722-730 p.
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-29559DOI: 10.1016/j.ejpain.2007.11.001ISI: 000257637100006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-44649092606OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-29559DiVA: diva2:872156
Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2015-11-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Overmeer, Thomas
In the same journal
European Journal of Pain
Other Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 23 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf