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Expressions of Identity and Self in Daily Life at a Group Home for Older Persons With Dementia in Japan
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5711-2391
Koshien Junior College, Nishinomiya JAPAN.
Kwansei Gakuin University, Nishinomiya, JAPAN.
2015 (English)In: Care Management Journals, ISSN 1521-0987, Vol. 16, no 2, 64-78 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study focuses on expressions of identity and self among residents at a group home for older persons with dementia in Japan—a study, which started as an explorative study on spirituality—and how residents make meaning of life. Although aware of stages of dementia illness and briefly commenting on these, the analysis does not make any specific point of it. This article views dementia from a sociocultural perspective and is based on participant observations at a group home with 19 residents, combined with interviews with 6 of them. Two central concepts for the study are discussed and drawn on in the analysis: ie, meaning home and family, and dementia and boke, senility. The study examines how the group home is ie and concludes that it is “home enough” in the sense that one’s identity and self are honored here. The old word boke represents a state in which one has “given up” any attempts to keep one’s mental health. This concept was used by some residents to mark the line between those who were “helpless” with boke and those who could manage by themselves without boke. Identities are analyzed in different terms: as profession, as feeling secure, as being physically close, in social interactions, and as being cared for properly also after death. The analysis of self and identity showed that contentment in life was expressed in various ways, as a whole or as a patchwork with light and dark colors, and that it is still in process. Here, the supportive but discreet scaffolding of staff seems to matter. Life is lived until death, and the farewell ceremonies are analyzed as existential closures for many—and for life finalized here at Ie, the group home.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2015. Vol. 16, no 2, 64-78 p.
Keyword [en]
dementia; Japan; participant observations; spirituality;
National Category
Social Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-29417DOI: 10.1891/1521-0987.16.2.64Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84931095011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-29417DiVA: diva2:865991
Note

Published in a Special issue Ethnocultural contextualization ofdementia care in Care Management Journals 16(2), edited by Eleonor Antelius and John Traphagan

Available from: 2015-10-30 Created: 2015-10-30 Last updated: 2016-04-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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Output format
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