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Effects of coping on psychological outcome when controlling for background variables: A study of traumatically spinal cord lesioned persons.
Health Care Research Unit, Göteborg University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5098-8489
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2002 (English)In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 40, no 8, 408-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional.

OBJECTIVES: In a previous study we found spinal cord lesion (SCL)-related coping factors to be distinctly related to levels of SCL-related psychological outcome. However, we did not control for other potentially confounding variables. In this study we investigated effects of coping strategies on psychological outcome reactions in traumatically spinal cord lesioned persons controlling for sociodemographic, disability-related and social support variables.

SETTING: The Gothenburg Spinal Injuries Unit in Sweden.

METHODS: The study sample comprised 255 persons and a subsample of 157 persons. A series of stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed.

RESULTS: SCL-related coping factors clearly predicted psychological outcome even when background variables were controlled. Higher levels of acceptance coping predicted decreased psychological distress and increased positive morale. Elevated social reliance coping predicted heightened distress. Higher levels of social support predicted lower feelings of helplessness. Sociodemographic and disability-related variables were weak predictors of psychological outcome with one exception: higher education predicted less bitterness and brooding.

CONCLUSION: SCL-related coping remained the most important predictor of psychological outcome even when a wide range of variables was controlled. Thus we conclude that psychosocial interventions aimed at helping individuals develop their coping strategies might be of substantial value in their adjustment to SCL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 40, no 8, 408-15 p.
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27802DOI: 10.1038/sj.sc.3101299PubMedID: 12124667OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-27802DiVA: diva2:800879
Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2015-04-13Bibliographically approved

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